That Nice Nazi Next Door Featured by NY Times Has Been FIRED Along with Wife and Family

TONY HOVATOR, WIFE, BROTHER-IN-LAW ALL FIRED. FORCED TO MOVE.

If you’re ever tempted to self-dox and reveal your true identity on the Internet, don’t.

MSN

A Nazi sympathizer who was profiled recently in The New York Times and his wife and brother-in-law have lost their jobs, after the article prompted an outpouring of hostility to the restaurant that employed them, both he and the restaurant said.

The Times article depicted Tony Hovater, 29, as an otherwise unremarkable person who voices “casually approving remarks about Hitler, disdain for democracy and belief that the races are better off separate.” He is active in a group called the Traditionalist Workers Party; organizations that track extremist groups have called it a hate group, allied with neo-Nazis, and call its views white supremacist, a label it rejects.

Mr. Hovater, his wife, Maria, and her brother had worked at 571 Grill and Draft House, near their home in New Carlisle, Ohio, a suburb of Dayton. Mr. Hovater worked at the restaurant as a part-time cook for a little over a year, according to a manager there.

Though the Times article did not mention the restaurant — Mr. Hovater had identified himself as a welder by trade — people appalled by his views learned that he worked there and began calling and leaving online messages.

The manager, who asked that his name not be used out of fear for his safety, said that there were dozens of angry, crude and threatening messages and that employees were scared.

In a brief telephone interview, Mr. Hovater said, “they decided to can me.” In a text message exchange, Mr. Hovater added, “we’re moving because of safety reasons.”

The restaurant gave a slightly different account in a statement it released on Wednesday, saying that because of the threats, he “suggested that we release him from employment.”

Supporters have contributed more than $6,000 to the Hovaters through a site that caters to extremists on the right.

The (((Deep State))) allows its army of Jews, Negros, and white race traitors to do its dirty work. There’s no need to arrest and ship Tony off to a Gulag for holding the wrong political views. Just get him fired.

Remember that he’s a cat lover? I hope his cats are taken care of as he’s forced to adopt to a life of homelessness and permanent joblessness.

White Sharia Featured in Three Prominent Profiles Over Last Two Days

Newsweek, SPLC Hatewatch, and the Jewish Forward have all come out with articles on White Sharia within the last day or two. I’ve posted the Newsweek article in full, followed by an excerpt from the SPLC. The Forward offers nothing not found in the other two.

The debate around White Sharia will determine the future direction and success of White Nationalism.

Newsweek

White supremacists want to take over everything — even the thing they hate the most: Islam’s Sharia Law.

White Sharia—as coined by a former Marine blogger—is still anti-Muslim, but seizes on orthodox Islam’s ideal of obedient women and turns it into its own movement, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate groups.

White Sharia started as an online meme by Sacco Vandal, the ex-soldier and white supremacist, who wrote on his blog that feminists and a falling American patriarchy are resulting in men losing their “barbarity.”

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(((Tanya Gersh’s))) Lawsuit Could Shut Down the Daily Stormer Permanently and Impoverish Andrew Anglin

CNET has updated a story first published in July to cover the latest on Tanya Gersh’s lawsuit against Andrew Anglin.

I’m excerpting the latter part of the long article, which is the part you’re the least likely to be familiar with.

I recall thinking a year ago when Anglin “trolled” Gersh that he must have a death wish for his site and his finances. A jury isn’t going to be sympathetic to a Nazi compared to a working mom. Furthermore, it appears Anglin isn’t going to show up for the trial, which means Gersh will win automatically.

CNET

Anglin initiated his attack against Gersh on Dec. 16, 2016, the day after Sherry Spencer posted an article to Medium accusing Gersh of bullying her into selling her property. The property had become the focus of Whitefish locals because of negative attention the town was getting as a result of Richard Spencer, who initially owned part of it, according to the lawsuit. Sherry, who lives in Dallas, has said her son no longer has an ownership stake.

Anglin encouraged his readers to participate in “an old fashioned Troll Storm” and tell Gersh what they thought of her “Jew agenda.” He published her address, telephone number and Twitter handle, as well as contact information for Judah Gersh, her husband, and Love Lives Here, a local group that promotes diversity.

Anglin also included the Twitter handle of Gersh’s son, whom he called a “creepy little faggot.”

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The Atlantic Profiles Andrew Anglin in “The Making of an American Nazi”

Andrew Anglin, publisher of the Daily Stormer, is either completely nuts or he’s been smeared and libeled by The Atlantic.

A journalist named Luke O’Brien has put together the story of Andrew’s life or at least what he says is Andrew’s life.

It’s going to be interesting to see how Anglin responds.

The piece is too long for me to condense, so I’m going to excerpt around a thousand words out of what must be 10,000 words or more.

The excerpt covers part of Anglin’s high school days in Columbus, Ohio, where he was born and raised.

The Atlantic

When Anglin entered the Linworth Alternative Program, Columbus’s “hippie” high school, as a freshman in 1999, other students found him a quiet, insecure kid who craved attention and wanted to fit in. A declared atheist, he styled his reddish hair in dreadlocks and favored jeans with 50-inch leg openings. He often wore a hoodie with a large fuck racism patch on the back.

Anglin was one of only two vegans at Linworth, and before long he began dating the other, a brunette named Alison in the class ahead of him, whom he wooed by baking vegan cookies. She was a popular girl who introduced him to a diverse and edgy clique of kids. To them, Anglin seemed sweet and funny, if a little too eager to latch on to causes. Alison was deeply into animal rights. Suddenly, he was too.

He also got deeply into drugs, according to half a dozen people who knew him at the time. He did LSD at school or while wandering through the scenic Highbanks Metro Park, north of the city. He took ketamine, ate psychedelic mushrooms, and snorted cocaine on weekends. He chugged Robitussin, and “robo tripped” so much that he damaged his stomach and would vomit into trash cans at school.

At home, Anglin spent hours in his parents’ basement downloading music and visiting early Flash-animation sites. According to Cameron Loomis, a former friend, Anglin’s favorite online destination was Rotten.com, which collected images of mangled corpses, deformities, and sexual perversions.

Anglin set up his own website, for a fake record label called “Andy Sucks! Records” that he used to dupe bands into sending him demo tapes. Here, his leftist leanings were on full display: He wrote posts encouraging people to send the Westboro Baptist Church death threats from untraceable accounts, and he mocked the Ku Klux Klan and other racist organizations. He wasn’t so different, back then, from the antifascist activists who would one day protest outside his dad’s office.

But people who knew Anglin in high school told me that, for reasons that were unclear, his behavior became erratic and frightening sometime around the beginning of his sophomore year at Linworth. Visitors to his house saw holes in his bedroom walls, and they knew that when he was upset, he would smash his head into things. Several recall an episode at a party: Anglin burst out crying after Alison drunkenly kissed someone else, then ran outside and bashed his head on the sidewalk over and over.

He harmed himself in other ways, too. He tried to tattoo the name of his favorite band, Modest Mouse, on his upper arm but gave up after two and a half letters, leaving him with moi etched on his skin. He stretched his earlobes by jamming thick marker caps into piercing holes until they dripped blood. He claimed to feel no pain and used lighters to melt the flesh on the inside of his forearms. He provoked people into assaulting him but never fought back, instead laughing as the blows fell. Two kids beat him into a gutter once. Anglin just lay there until they stopped, out of pity and confusion.

Former friends recall that Anglin’s parents seemed blind to their son’s alarming behavior. And while he could be tender toward his younger siblings, Chelsey and Mitch, and loyal to his friends, he also had a sadistic side. Alison (who asked that her last name be withheld from this article) told me that during Anglin’s sophomore year, she called him, distraught: She said she’d passed out at a party and been raped by a friend’s older brother. She needed compassion and support, but Anglin just laughed and broke up with her.

“You’re a slut,” she remembers him saying.

Several girls Anglin had gotten to know at another high school began calling her house at all hours of the night, according to Alison and other sources. “You deserved it,” they’d say. “You slut.” Alison says the abuse went on for weeks, as Anglin showed friends a video he’d made of them having sex.

After the breakup, Dan Newman, another friend at the time, remembers Anglin once bashing his head into the walls of his bedroom in such a frenzy that his mother had to call the police. Several classmates told me that Anglin didn’t date again in high school and sometimes tried to kiss other boys, including one black student he especially liked. Whether this behavior was authentic experimentation or just for shock value, it’s notable in light of the extreme homophobia Anglin has since expressed on The Daily Stormer and elsewhere. He has advocated, for instance, throwing gays off buildings, isis-style.

The time that Anglin spent in the Philippines pursuing Filipina girls is equally as interesting as his high school years. According to O’Brien, Anglin had a conspiracy website modeled after Alex Jones while he lived there. His behavior was also erratic, as at one point he disappeared into the jungle for months in pursuit of what he considered to be life in paradise.

As I’m finishing up this post I don’t see anything posted on the Daily Stormer responding to this mini-biography.

Anglin is supposed to be in court in December to answer Tanya Gersh’s lawsuit. Her attorneys will have the opportunity to ask Anglin relevant questions.

His answers will hopefully pull back the layers of mystery surrounding him.

Under Attack: New York Times Defends Story About Nice White Nationalist Cat Lover Tony Hovator

TONY HOVATOR. JUST YOUR AVERAGE NAZI NEXT DOOR.

When I ran the New York Times condensation I did about Tony Hovator on Sunday, I mentioned that I thought people would take it as positive toward White Nationalism.

Well, I was right.

The New York Times is defending the piece on Tony, trying to make it clear that it wasn’t intended to be positive toward White Nationalism.

Yahoo

In the wake of widespread backlash against its profile of a Nazi sympathizer, The New York Times said on Sunday it regrets offending readers and defended elements of the story criticized as normalizing white extremism.

“Our reporter and his editors agonized over the tone and content of the article,” Times national editor Marc Lacey wrote in a response to readers. “The point of the story was not to normalize anything but to describe the degree to which hate and extremism have become far more normal in American life than many of us want to think.”

The story, which ran on Saturday, spotlighted white supremacist Tony Hovater of New Carlisle, Ohio. The portrait of the “Nazi sympathizer next door” and his hatred for Jews, admiration for Adolf Hitler and belief in racial segregation is told against the backdrop of him cooking pasta at home, contemplating his honeymoon and enjoying “Seinfeld” ― all details critics say inadvertently normalized people like Hovater.

In its response, the Times said some saw the value in using those details to show how easy it is for the average American to adopt such radical views. “People mad about this article want to believe that Nazis are monsters we cannot relate to,” the Times quoted from Mother Jones reporter Shane Bauer’s tweet.

The point of the story was not to normalize anything but to describe the degree to which hate and extremism have become far more normal in American life than many of us want to think. New York Times national editor Marc Lacey

Many critics of the profile agreed with that sentiment, but also said the Times went wrong by failing to address why and how Hovater developed his extreme beliefs.

Richard Fausset, the profile’s author, admitted in a followup piece Saturday that those unasked questions about Hovater were “a hole at the heart of [his] story.” When a Times editor told him that, in a first draft, those questions “had not been sufficiently addressed,” Fausset returned for more reporting on Hovater in search of answers, but came up empty.

“I beat myself up about all of this for a while, until I decided that the unfilled hole would have to serve as both feature and defect,” Fausset wrote. The Times’ response on Sunday, however, does not directly address this shortcoming or its decision to publish the story despite it.

“We recognize that people can disagree on how best to tell a disagreeable story,” the Times said in conclusion. “What we think is indisputable, though, is the need to shed more light, not less, on the most extreme corners of American life and the people who inhabit them. That’s what the story, however imperfectly, tried to do.”

The Times did say it erred in judgment by including in the profile a link to a site that sells swastika armbands.

“This was intended to show the darker reality beyond the anodyne language of the website. But we saw the criticism, agreed and removed the link.”

Commenter Bill left this at Yahoo, which is some nice pushback, even if it doesn’t mention Jews:

What about the black nurses who laughed (and neglected) the white WW2 veteran who just died in a nursing home (it’s on video)? What about the black “Night Nurse” who said that white women are raising “killers and rapists” on her twitter account? Are we going to see stories profiling that absolute disdain that many blacks have for the white race, simply because they are white (and because it’s easier to point the finger at an “oppressor” that is keeping you down rather than to look in the mirror and see the reality is that you are a loser in life)? Probably not!

I’ve put more perceptive comments from Yahoo behind the “continue reading” button:

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NY Times Interviews “A Voice of Hate in America’s Heartland”

TONY HOVATOR. JUST A NORMAL GUY AWAKENED TO THE TRUTH THAT DEMOCRACY DOESN’T WORK.

The New York Times has published an article featuring a White Nationalist young man, the very articulate Tony Hovater, whose life is boringly normal. While he has no dog, he does have cats and a new bride, who shares his belief in White Nationalism.

On the surface, the Times paints a sympathetic picture of Tony. But I’m willing to bet that the cues in the article would leave most white people thinking of Tony as a loser. By that psyop, the Times surely hopes to discourage others in his generation from joining the movement.

I’ve taken the 2,400 word article and condensed it to 1,600 words. I’ve also omitted two of the pictures from this condensation. A reminder: The NY Times allows you to read 10 free articles a month. After that you hit a paywall.

New York Times

HUBER HEIGHTS, Ohio —

In Ohio, amid the row crops and rolling hills, the Olive Gardens and Steak ’n Shakes, Mr. Hovater’s presence can make hardly a ripple. He is the Nazi sympathizer next door, polite and low-key at a time the old boundaries of accepted political activity can seem alarmingly in flux. Most Americans would be disgusted and baffled by his casually approving remarks about Hitler, disdain for democracy and belief that the races are better off separate. But his tattoos are innocuous pop-culture references: a slice of cherry pie adorns one arm, a homage to the TV show “Twin Peaks.” He says he prefers to spread the gospel of white nationalism with satire. He is a big “Seinfeld” fan.

“I guess it seems weird when talking about these type of things,” he says. “You know, I’m coming at it in a mid-90s, Jewish, New York, observational-humor way.”

Mr. Hovater, 29, is a welder by trade. He is not a star among the resurgent radical American right so much as a committed foot soldier — an organizer, an occasional podcast guest on a website called Radio Aryan, and a self-described “social media villain,” although, in person, his Midwestern manners would please anyone’s mother. In 2015, he helped start the Traditionalist Worker Party, one of the extreme right-wing groups that marched in Charlottesville, Va., in August, and again at a “White Lives Matter” rally last month in Tennessee. The group’s stated mission is to “fight for the interests of White Americans.’’

Its leaders claim to oppose racism, though the Anti-Defamation League says the group “has participated in white supremacist events all over the country.” On its website, a swastika armband goes for $20.

If the Charlottesville rally came as a shock, with hundreds of white Americans marching in support of ideologies many have long considered too vile, dangerous or stupid to enter the political mainstream, it obscured the fact that some in the small, loosely defined alt-right movement are hoping to make those ideas seem less than shocking for the “normies,” or normal people, that its sympathizers have tended to mock online.

And to go from mocking to wooing, the movement will be looking to make use of people like the Hovaters and their trappings of normie life — their fondness for National Public Radio, their four cats, their bridal registry.

“We need to have more families. We need to be able to just be normal,” said Matthew Heimbach, the leader of the Traditionalist Worker Party, in a podcast conversation with Mr. Hovater. Why, he asked self-mockingly, were so many followers “abnormal”?

Mr. Hovater replied: “I mean honestly, it takes people with, like, sort of an odd view of life, at first, to come this way. Because most people are pacified really easy, you know. Like, here’s some money, here’s a nice TV, go watch your sports, you know?”

He added: “The fact that we’re seeing more and more normal people come is because things have gotten so bad. And if they keep getting worse, we’ll keep getting more, just, normal people.”

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Pentagon Drops SPLC from Training Materials

The SPLC is going to be taking a hit to its bottom line. It’s “educational” materials are biased against conservatives. It’s main mission, besides spreading hatred of white people, is raising money. Thanks to wise heads in the Pentagon, one source of taxpayer dollars is being cut off.

Daily Caller via archive.is

The Pentagon has officially severed all ties to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) after previously relying on the group’s training materials on extremism.

Brian J. Field, assistant U.S. attorney from the Civil Division, stated that the Department of Defense (DOD) Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity removed any and all references to the SPLC in training materials used by the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI), in an email obtained by The Daily Caller News Foundation from the Department of Justice.

The DEOMI is a DOD school founded to fight segregation and inequality that teaches courses in racial, gender and religious equality, among other subject areas like equal opportunity and pluralism. The courses are available to DOD civilians and service members.

As part of a response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request from the Immigration Reform Law Institute, Field wrote in the email sent in late September:

Additionally, the DEOMI office informed me that, based on a previous FOIA request, DEOMI records concerning, regarding, or related to the preparation and presentation of training materials on hate groups or hate crimes were forwarded … That 133-page document did reference the SPLC; however, based upon guidance from the Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity, all references to the SPLC have been removed from any current training.

Interestingly, DEOMI still makes use of materials on “Hate Symbols” from the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), a group similar to the SPLC. Students at DEOMI use the Hate Symbols reference on the ADL site to “learn more about gang colors or clothing; hate group tattoos and body markings associated with such gangs.”

As a matter of policy, the DOD does not have an official list of hate groups.

In early 2014, the Pentagon told CNS News that while it would remove information on hate groups provided by the SPLC, it would continue to rely on SPLC data in “non-federal reference material” for DEOMI. It appears that the DOD’s DEOMI has now decided to sever ties with the SPLC, as DEOMI is the only sub-branch of the Pentagon with any records of SPLC materials.

The Pentagon’s decision to terminate its relationship with the SPLC comes at a time when the group has under major fire from conservative organizations, particularly in the form of lawsuits. D. James Kennedy Ministries, a Christian ministry from Fort Lauderdale, Fla., recently sued the SPLC after being labeled a hate group. The SPLC has also faced criticism from liberals. In late August, anti-Muslim extremism activist and feminist Ayaan Hirsi Ali argued in The New York Times that “the S.P.L.C. is an organization that has lost its way, smearing people who are fighting for liberty and turning a blind eye to an ideology and political movement that has much in common with Nazism.”

For Ali, corporations and donors in Hollywood “need to find more trustworthy and deserving partners to work with than the SPLC.”
Notably, the Pentagon is not the only federal agency to drop the SPLC.

In February, The Daily Caller News Foundation published an exclusive piece indicating that the FBI, which formerly used the SPLC as a “hate crimes resource,” has also been distancing itself from the group.

The SPLC did not respond to a request for comment from The Daily Caller News Foundation by press time.