Stilettogate: FLOTUS High Heels Come Under Fire From Hateful Social Media and Fake News

People with too much time on their hands created a flap over the First Lady’s footwear. As I like to say, America is not a serious country anymore. The liberal mass hysteria over the election of Donald Trump to the presidency expresses itself in some bizarre, hateful ways.

Check out the post immediately previous to this one to see the freak of a journalist who started this fake news hating on Melania.


On 29 August 2017, President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump boarded Air Force One and flew to Corpus Christi to meet with Texas Governor Greg Abbot and other officials in the wake of a devastating hurricane:

The images quickly went viral, with many people sharing them alongside comments mocking the First Lady for purportedly choosing high heels for a trip to a disaster area:

Amidst the hubbub, some suggested that the First Lady had actually worn her heels in Texas:

Melania Trump did wear heels — but she wore them in Washington, D.C. as she boarded Air Force One. She changed her shoes on the airplane and wore a pair of sneakers in Texas:

But what a first lady wears to leave the White House, headed to Marine One and then to Air Force One, isn’t usually what she’s wearing when she gets off the plane later.

By the time Trump arrived in Texas she had changed into white tennis shoes, a white shirt and a black cap with FLOTUS emblazoned on it, and her hair pulled up and off her face.

The White House released a handful of photographs from the visit, only one of which featured Melania’s shoes. We cropped that photograph to better display her footwear:

Here’s another photograph of the First Lady as she disembarked Air Force One in Texas:

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One from Steve Bannon

Snopes rates this quote as unproven but similar to some things that Bannon has said.

Is Baron Trump a Time Traveler? Confirmed by Snopes (Video and Links)

Wow! This story is breaking all over the Internet in the last few hours. Snopes describes it as mostly true.


Author Ingersoll Lockwood wrote the books “Baron Trump’s Marvelous Underground Journey” and “1900: or, The Last President” in the 1890s.


Forget for a moment the seemingly endless series of revelations about the Trump White House’s staffing woes, the Russia investigation, and the Seth Rich conspiracy. A pressing matter, largely ignored by the mainstream media has come up: Is Donald Trump a time traveler?

The question has been circulating on conspiracy theory web sites for several months and is backed by various pieces of “evidence” (such as Donald Trump’s uncle John Trump’s purported relationship with Nikola Tesla). Now a series of books published over century ago is receiving attention for their seemingly all-too-eerie connections to the Trump family. The books, one of which is titled Baron Trump’s Marvelous Underground Journey, have been discussed on both reddit and 4chan:

Baron Trump’s Marvelous Underground Journey, and its sequel 1900: or, The Last President, are indeed real books by writer Ingersoll Lockwood. (We haven’t been able to uncover any evidence proving that Donald Trump and his family have access to a time machine, however).

Both of the books are archived by the Library of Congress and can be read in full on Baron Trump’s Marvelous Underground Journey was published in 1893 and 1900: or, The Last President came out a few years later. According to the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Lockwood penned at least one other book about the Baron Trump character, The Travels and Adventures of Little Baron Trump and His Wonderful Dog Bulgar, which was published in 1890.

A July 2017 article in Newsweek noted several prescient-seeming connections, such as the novel’s Russian setting, a character named “Don,” and a “Fifth Avenue Hotel” in New York City, where Trump Tower currently stands:

There are some incredible connections to be made to the first family of the United States and Lockwood’s novels from the turn of the 19th century. For starters, the main character’s name is the same as President Donald Trump’s son, albeit spelt differently. Trump’s adventures begin in Russia, and are guided thanks to directions provided by “the master of all masters,” a man named “Don.”

Before leaving for his voyage through the unknown, Trump is told of his family’s motto: “The pathway to glory is strewn with pitfalls and dangers.”


But by Lockwood’s third novel, The Last President, things become even more eerily linked to the present day.

The story begins with a scene from a panicked New York City in early November, describing a “state of uproar” after the election of an enormously opposed outsider candidate.

“The entire East Side is in a state of uproar,” police officers shouted through the streets, warning city folk to stay indoors for the night. “Mobs of vast size are organizing under the lead of anarchists and socialists, and threaten to plunder and despoil the houses of the rich who have wronged and oppressed them for so many years.”

“The Fifth Avenue Hotel will be the first to feel the fury of the mob,” the novel continues, citing an address in New York City where Trump Tower now stands. “Would the troops be in time to save it?”

However, some of these connections were slightly exaggerated or outright misstated. For one, the main character is called Baron Trump not because his name is Baron but because he is a baron — in other words, that’s his title. The book begins with a “Biographical Notice of Wilhelm Heinrich Sebastian Von Troomp, Commonly Called Little Baron Trump”:

As doubting Thomases seem to take particular pleasure in popping up on all occasions, Jack-in-the-Box-like, it may be well to head them off in this particular instance by proving that Baron Trump was a real baron, and not a mere baron of the mind.

Newsweek similarly mistakes the Don Fum character’s honorific for his name, calling him “a man named ‘Don.’” In fact, “Don” is a Spanish honorific meaning “Mr.,” and the character (a “learned Spaniard”) was introduced by Lockwood on page 2 of Baron Trump’s Marvelous Underground Journey:

Blah, blah, blah. You get the idea. Here are the links:

Link to Baron Trump’s Marvelous Underground Journey pdf

Link to 1900 or The Last President pdf

Snopes Tries to Debunk Theory that Natural Healer Justine Damond Was Murdered on Orders from Big Pharma

Snopes does NOT successfully debunk the conspiracy theory that focuses on Justine’s work in holistic healing. However, different people may have different opinions on the matter.

It would be useful to check her murderer’s bank account to see if there were any large and unusual deposits recently. Mohammed Noor could have been paid by someone to kill Justine in a set up where she was forced to call police.

For now, my theory is simplest and works best in my opinion. A Muzzie who hates white women saw a chance to kill and took it.

Here’s an excerpt from Snopes that looks at the theory that Holistic Healers are being murdered across the U.S.


On 16 July 2017, alternative health blogger Erin Elizabeth reported on her web site Health Nut News that Justine Ruszczyk (who primarily used her fiance’s surname, Damond), a 40-year-old Australian woman living in the U.S. who was shot and killed in mid-July 2017 by Minneapolis police, was among a growing list of holistic doctors who had died under suspicious circumstances. That narrative was further twisted by the disreputable conspiracy site YourNewsWire with the headline, “Holistic Doctor, Working Against Big Pharma, Shot Dead By Police.”

Elizabeth compiled a list in 2016 of what she characterized as more than sixty holistic doctors that died between June 2015 and August 2016, asserting that the deaths were somehow connected. Although Elizabeth stopped short of saying who the culprit was, the implication was that the healers were being systematically killed because of their occupations.

As we noted in May 2017, the tragedies are unrelated to each other — there is no evidence of a conspiracy to wipe out holistic doctors. Elizabeth’s list was a sloppy compilation of natural deaths, accidents and crimes. Ten of the people on the list, in fact, had no connection to holistic medicine. That didn’t stop YourNewsWire (and others) from turning the Damond shooting into yet another tragedy blatantly exploited by conspiracy theorists:

According to reports, the police who arrived (including the one who shot her) had their body cameras turned off.

The well-known health and lifestyle coach, who was actively campaigning for people to take control of their lives and reject Big Pharma’s crippling products, joins the long list of holistic doctors and healers who have been killed in suspicious or unsolved circumstances during the past two years.

There are subgroups of Americans who are disproportionately killed by police, but holistic healers as a group are not among them. African-American people and mentally ill people, for example, have higher likelihoods of being victims in such incidents. To say that Damond’s death is the result of her occupation as a holistic healer is to disingenuously supplant a factual social problem with a fictional one. The Sydney, Australian native’s 15 July 2017 death could be linked instead to an actual pattern in the United States in which civilians are extrajudicially killed while interacting with police officers.

As of 24 July, 688 people have been killed by American law enforcement in 2017, according to the tracking site The web site tallied 1,162 law enforcement-related deaths in 2016. (Because the federal government has fallen short in tracking such killings, volunteers have stepped up to the plate with databases like Killed By Police and Fatal Encounters.)

According to the Hennepin County Medical Examiner’s Office, Damond did die from a gunshot wound to the abdomen, and her death was ruled a homicide. But contradicting the suspicion that Damond was the target of an assassination due to her alternative health practices, she herself dialed 911 at 11:30 P.M., because she heard what she believed to be a sexual assault outside her Minneapolis, Minnesota home — and her call for emergency services ended with her death.

According to the Minneapolis Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, which is investigating the incident, two Minneapolis Police Department officers, Matthew Harrity and Mohamed Noor, responded to the call. Harrity was driving and Noor was in the passenger seat. According to the BCA’s preliminary investigation, Harrity said he was startled by a loud noise just as Damond approached the squad car. Noor opened fire through Harrity’s open driver’s side window, striking Damond in the abdomen.

Further contradicting the notion that Damond’s death was an assassination, both officers tried to revive her. They “immediately exited the squad and provided medical attention until medical personnel arrived,” according to the BCA.

The case is part of an ongoing — and wrenching — public discourse over police killings. Neither Harrity or Noor’s body cameras filmed the shooting, nor did the squad car’s camera. Police killings of people like Philando Castile, Eric Garner, Mike Brown, Manuel Diaz, and Kelly Thomas have resulted in civil unrest in recent years.

There’s a big difference between the police killing black male thugs and killing a middle aged white woman. There are a lot of supporters of mass immigration into the U.S. from Africa that want Mohammed Noor exonerated.

Ain’t gonna happen!


Snopes in Danger of Shutting Down–Begs for $$$

Fact checking website is one of the most popular sites on the Internet. Recently, it’s become embroiled in scandal relating to sex and the misuse of funds, are reported on saboteur365 last December 22.

There are legal claims that were asserted this year that there’s more scamming going on in relation to Snopes. The response by Snopes has been to start a fund raising campaign. The Gofundme appeal has already raised $281,000 toward a half million dollar goal.

First, the Snopes fund raising appeal, then the story about the lawsuit relating to ownership and control of Snopes and misuse of funds by the Jewish owner.

Go Fund Me


Dear Readers,, which began as a small one-person effort in 1994 and has since become one of the Internet’s oldest and most popular fact-checking sites, is in danger of closing its doors. So, for the first time in our history, we are turning to you, our readership, for help.

Since our inception, we have always been a self-sustaining site that provides a free service to the online world: we’ve had no sponsors, no outside investors or funding, and no source of revenue other than that provided by online advertising. Unfortunately, we have been cut off from our historic source of advertising income.

We had previously contracted with an outside vendor to provide certain services for That contractual relationship ended earlier this year, but the vendor will not acknowledge the change in contractual status and continues to essentially hold the web site hostage. Although we maintain editorial control (for now), the vendor will not relinquish the site’s hosting to our control, so we cannot modify the site, develop it, or — most crucially — place advertising on it. The vendor continues to insert their own ads and has been withholding the advertising revenue from us.

Our legal team is fighting hard for us, but, having been cut off from all revenue, we are facing the prospect of having no financial means to continue operating the site and paying our staff (not to mention covering our legal fees) in the meanwhile.

As misinformation has increasingly threatened democracies around the world (including our own), has stood in the forefront of fighting for truth and dispelling misinformation online. It is vital that these efforts continue, so we are asking the community to donate what they can. (Our suggested donation is $10, but if you can give more please consider doing so — every little bit helps.)

We need our community now more than ever, as it is only through your support that can remain the community and resource we all know and love.

Sincerely yours,

Team Snopes.

Excerpt from Courthouse News

A lawsuit filed in California last week claims the fact-check news site has been caught up in its own concealment scheme, in an ownership spat that has left the site’s personnel matters in limbo.

Internet media management company Proper Media sued Bardav Inc. and its owner David Mikkelson over the “unlawful jockeying for ownership and control of the fact-checking website,” which gained a national profile during the presidential election last year and “recently entered into a high-profile agreement with Facebook to integrate fact-checking services into its social media platform,” according to the 16-page lawsuit filed in San Diego Superior Court on May 4.

Mikkelson and his ex-wife Barbara founded Bardav – which owns the Snopes website – in 2003, and each owned a 50 percent shared in the company. When the two divorced, Barbara Mikkelson sold her share to Proper Media last July.

While Proper Media was already managing a significant amount of the operation of Snopes including all content and advertising accounts prior to acquiring shares in the company, the company says in its complaint that when its individual shareholders, including Vincent Green, gained a stake in Snopes a scam was launched to take over the website – one of the 1,000 most popular in the United States.

But Proper Media says in its complaint that Mikkelson “was unhappy that Barbara maintained ownership of half of what he always considered to be his company after the divorce.”

Thus, Proper Media says, Green and Mikkelson conspired to gain majority control of Bardav and Mikkelson and Green blocked its access to “personnel, accounts, tools and data necessary to manage Snopes,” according to the lawsuit.

“Mikkelson, in conjunction with Green, intentionally did block Proper Media’s access to personnel, accounts, tools and data to take over Snopes and to prevent Proper Media from performing under the general services agreement,” Proper Media says in its lawsuit.

The company also accuses Mikkelson of misusing Bardav funds and says he was improperly reimbursed for legal fees related to his divorce and travel expenses from when he went on a honeymoon to Asia late last year with his new bride – Snopes employee Elyssa Young.


Meanwhile, Green removed $10,000 worth of computer equipment used by three Proper Media employees before sending his resignation to Proper Media from a Snopes email account, according to Proper Media’s lawsuit. The company also accuses him of blocking its founders – plaintiffs Christopher Richmond and Drew Schoentrup – from accessing Snopes’ content-management system.

Additionally, Proper Media says Green removed Snopes-related data from its online communication tools including Slack and Asana. The company says Green admitted he did not complete work for Proper Media from the start of the alleged conspiracy in January up until his resignation April 3, even though the company paid him and contributed to his health insurance premiums, according to the lawsuit.

Proper Media is still responsible for operating the content-management system for Snopes, though access to the system remains blocked for Proper Media employees, the lawsuit says.

Shut it down. It’s fake news.

Snopes Defends Trump

It looks like liberal website doesn’t want be devoured by the sinkhole of public disgust that is swallowing up and spitting out the corporate media.

A couple of days ago Snopes published an in-depth analysis of how anti-Trump hatchet jobs are fabricated. It’s hard to picture CNN being this fair. This doesn’t mean that Snopes has seen the light and joined the alt-right. I don’t know for sure what it does mean. I just know that it’s a good thing when the smear jobs perpetrated against Trump are exposed.

Excerpt from Snopes

Broadly speaking, most of the falsehoods levelled against Trump fall into one or more of four categories, each of them drawing from and feeding into four public personas inhabited by the President.

They are:

Donald Trump: International Embarrassment
Trump the Tyrant
Donald Trump: Bully baby
Trump the Buffoon.

Some of these claims are downright fake, entirely fabricated by unreliable or dubious web sites and presented as satire, or otherwise blatantly false. But the rest — some of which have gained significant traction and credibility from otherwise serious people and organizations — provide a fascinating insight into the tactics and preoccupations of the broad anti-Trump movement known as “the Resistance,” whether they were created by critics of the President or merely shared by them.

Generally speaking, we discovered that they are characterized and driven by four types of errors of thought:

A lack of historical context or awareness
Cherry-picking of evidence (especially visual evidence)
A failure to adhere to Occam’s Razor — the common-sense understanding that the simplest explanation for an event or behavior is the most likely.

Infused throughout almost all these claims, behind their successful dissemination, is confirmation bias: the fuel that drives the spread of all propaganda and false or misleading claims among otherwise sensible and skeptical people. Confirmation bias is the tendency to look for, find, remember and share information that confirms the beliefs we already have, and the tendency to dismiss, ignore and forget information that contradicts those beliefs. It is one of the keys to why clever people, on all sides of every disagreement, sometimes believe stupid things that aren’t true.

We’re going to take a look at the four major types of falsehood we found, which correspond with Donald Trump’s four public personas, and point out along the way how various errors in thought have played a role in their origins and their spread.

Donald Trump: International Embarrassment


What’s remarkable is the extent to which false claims about the President revolve around body language, nonverbal gestures and symbolism, all phenomena that are notoriously open to interpretation. These lies and misrepresentations are also often based on snapshots — visual evidence presented without proper context.

Take, for example, the claim that Trump was the only world leader at a G7 summit in May not to take notes, based on a photograph posted to Twitter by French President Emannuel Macron. Here Trump was portrayed as unprepared and out of his depth on the world stage, with a “ten-second attention span”. However, the claim was entirely untrue, with other images and video of the meeting showing that Trump did indeed have notes and a pen. Not only that, but the very image used to make the false claim clearly shows two other world leaders sitting with no note-taking paraphernalia. In this case, even the cherry-picked evidence chosen to make the point undermines it.

The remainder of the article carries through in the spirit expressed in this excerpt. Significant lies about President Trump are called out, while the reader is shown the logical framework behind the lie.

Regular readers of this and other alt-right sites know the routine, which is why we ignore most of the ridiculous anti-Trump nonsense that the corporate media and Trump-hating Tweeters spew out 24/7.

Video Showing White Supremacists Lynching Black Female on Facebook Sparks Outrage


A Facebook video depicting a black woman being lynched by a white man dressed in a Confederate battle flag t-shirt went viral on Friday. It’s not clear if the video is staged or shows an actual lynching.

Users who flagged the graphic video to Facebook community managers on Friday said the site did not take the clip down. Instead, sources who flagged the video told Mic, the video was marked as restricted for viewing by people 18 years old and up.

The 17-second clip, which appears to have been edited to obscure the face of the man pulling the rope to hang the woman, had been viewed more than 432,000 times by late Friday morning. It also had been shared over 14,000 times and drew more than 8,700 comments. The user who originally uploaded the video posted it Thursday morning with the caption, “I hope this is not real??”

The Facebook clip has rattled many on the site, including Black Lives Matter activists who alerted Mic to the video and joined others in trying to get the video pulled from social media.

(Editor’s note: Graphic description of the video, as well as an obscured screenshot, appears below. View with discretion.)

In the clip, a black woman who appears drugged or intoxicated kneels as two white men tighten a noose around her neck. The video then cuts to a man pulling the rope in as the woman dangles and gasps for air. A Confederate battle flag and a Gadsden flag are visible behind the dangling woman, whose body goes limp as the clip ends.

After several Facebook users reported the video, some received the following response from website’s support team and shared screen shots of their responses: “Facebook is a place where people can share their experiences and raise awareness about issues important to them. However, after hearing feedback from our community, we now limit visibility of this type of content to people older than 18.”

The message goes on to say that community managers would display a warning to users that the video contains graphic content. Facebook’s response to the video, which includes language verbatim from its online community standards guidelines, seems to be in conflict with its policy on violent and graphic content.

“We remove graphic images when they are shared for sadistic pleasure or to celebrate or glorify violence,” the policy reads.

A spokesperson for the company told Mic on Friday morning that Facebook was looking into the video.

Facebook recently hired 3,000 people to help the company stop users from broadcasting scenes of murder and sexual assault through Facebook Live, following the posting of a video showing the actual shooting of Robert Goodwin Sr. in April. The company has also drawn criticism for reportedly forcing users to remove art that depicts nudity and photos of breastfeeding mothers.

The origins of the video in question are unclear. However, the clip appears to be a shortened version of a longer video posted to the website DailyMotion in February. By Friday afternoon, the website had pulled the video.

In that version, the black woman is beaten and knocked to the ground. One man is seen urinating on the motionless woman, before she is picked up and the noose is fitted around her neck. The video was posted to a DailyMotion account titled “Confederate’s Revenge.” and includes a warning to viewers. “Torture a white kid? Be prepared for THIS!”

Mic reached out to the Southern Poverty Law Center, which monitors hate groups and domestic extremists. A representative for the organization did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

I copied the video from World Star Hip Hop, where some commenters think the hanging is real, but most are angry at the black actress for her performance, expressing the view that it demeans intelligent black women.

Snopes weighs in, noting that the video does not show a black woman who was actually found hanging recently. Snopes goes on to reveal that the Negress in the video appears to be porn actress Trazcy Kush, pictured below.

Using Google image search, it’s clear that Trazcy Kush has sex on camera with a lot of white males. In the long version of the lynching video, the white “Confederates” urinate on the woman. No real southern man would do that. He would get to work by carrying out the lynching.

Verdict here: Fake fetish video.