Arizona High School Students Who Formed Human Swastika are Being Punished

Presumably, a group of male students were making a political statement when they formed the human swastika pictured above.

It may simply be a case of Generation Z rejecting political correctness, which has reached epic proportions.

Or, it may be a case of expressing contempt for Jews.

Their identities and motivation remain a mystey.

ABC15

PARADISE VALLEY, AZ – A handful of students at Paradise Valley High School are being disciplined after they were photographed lying on the ground in the formation of a swastika symbol.

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White Nationalist Banned from Gym

Richard Spencer was banned from his gym last year when an obnoxious Jewish woman complained to the management.

Now, Greg Johnson reportedly has been banned from another gym across the country from Spencer’s gym.

Managment claims that people are afraid when a white nationalist is in the room.

Excerpt from SLOG

A local racist has one less place to work out.

On Thursday, the owners of NW Fitness Project banned Greg Johnson, a Seattle-based publisher, from their Fremont gym.

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Britain: Filthy Somali Tells Girl He’s Raping She Couldn’t be a virgin because “you’re white.”

AHMED ABDOULE. RAPIST.

An eleven year sentence for Ahmed means he’ll be out in five or six, ready to rape another white girl.

The British justice system needs a dose of tough love injected into it. For the Nog rapist, he’ll be enjoying the company of his fellow Nogs in prison. That’s not much punishment. The cat o’nine tails offers better possibilities.

metro.co.uk

A rapist has been jailed for 11 years after he held a sharp piece of wood to a teenager’s throat as he attacked her.

Actually, the rape of a child should be punishable by death, after the cat o’nine tails have done their job.

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‘I’m 1/16 black’: Three girls are expelled as ‘racist’ Snapchat photo sparks outrage at George Washington University

The usual sickening responses by administrators to a harmless prank are disgusting.

Excerpt from AJC

Three students at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., are being kicked out of their sorority after an inappropriate and racially insensitive photo posted to Snapchat made the rounds on social media.

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Divorce: Selective Shaming by the Left Used to Destroy Traditional Morality

Yesterday, one of the featured news stories here was the effort by local authorities to force semi-nude coffee girls in Everett, Washington to cover up.

We discussed the sleezy baristas and their sleezy customers in the context of the law.

What surely disturbs some of us is the lack of society’s disapproval of naked coffee stands.

Shaming by leftists rarely extends to sexual behavior by women, but only by men. This selective shaming is unhealthy. Baring your surgically enhanced breasts to sell a cup of coffee to some horny fool isn’t “empowering” no matter what feminists say.

The following excerpt covers a chunk of a wider discussion on shaming as a tactic to discourage sleezy or harmful behavior. The focus in the excerpt is on divorce. However, shaming (and shunning) is a tactic that ought to be widely applied in our “anything goes” culture. Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey are not the only ones who deserve to be shamed.

Excerpt from The Federalist

Sociologists such as W. Bradford Wilcox at the University of Virginia for decades have noted the tremendous damage divorce — another project of the sexual revolution — has done to America’s social fabric. Children exposed to divorce are more likely than their peers in intact marriages to suffer from serious social or psychological pathologies. Adolescents with divorced parents are more likely to drop out of high school when compared to children from intact families. Adolescent girls with divorced parents are three times more likely to become teen mothers, while their male counterparts are twice as likely to spend time in prison.

The effects of divorce are a huge drain on our nation’s wealth and resources. If the United States enjoyed the same level of family stability today as it did in 1960, one sociologist has estimated that the nation would have 750,000 fewer children repeating grades, 1.2 million fewer school suspensions, approximately 500,000 fewer acts of teenage delinquency, about 600,000 fewer kids receiving therapy, and about 70,000 fewer suicide attempts every year. Wilcox’s research has found similar detrimental effects caused by cohabitation.

Yet our culture, media, and dominant institutions have not only abandoned any kind of shame attached to divorce, cohabitation, or other deleterious side-effects of the sexual revolution (e.g. abortion on demand, pornography); we promote them as an intrinsic part of our freedom to pursue our own life goals and self-actualization.

Curiously, the only elements of the sexual revolution mainstream culture seems focused on attacking are those perceived to violate consent — harassment, rape, etc. Even here the hypocrisy runs deep: children from divorced families don’t consent to broken homes; the approximately 650,000 American babies aborted every year don’t consent to their conception or subsequent murder; and most parents have not consented to a culture where children are exposed on average to pornography at the age of 11.

Burgo’s article goes on to provide a methodology for appropriately applying shame. It must not only humiliate, “it should leave room for those who have violated our standards to experience remorse and then to make amends.” The ultimate goal is to “ease the shaming” and allow violators of our culture’s mores to reintegrate into society. Shame, public penance, forgiveness, and reintegration. This also should sound familiar.

Prior to the secularization and atomization of Western society, this is the way our communities, either through the judicial system or churches, dealt with crimes against society. As First Things contributor Marc Barnes notes, citing Cambridge University historian Helen Mary Carrel, the majority of medieval punishments “were administered by small communities who took responsibility for their own criminals. Shaming punishments — like shaving the head of an adulteress or dunking a crooked merchant in the river — worked, and they worked because a person really could be shamed to have broken the peace of an actual community of neighbors.”

Today our public shaming methods obviously need not be identical to these, but can at least include other more modernly acceptable methods of expressing disapproval. Moreover, for many centuries, those who violated church rules were expected to publicly confess their sins and do penance, then were ultimately reintegrated into the Christian community.

Ironically enough, far removed from the Enlightenment and its attempts to remove the shackles of institutional religion’s influence on society, modern experts are (seemingly unknowingly) taking their cues from the tactics of pre-modern Christian societies. Forms of shame — both public and internal — are now good and useful. So is public penance and ultimately, forgiveness (although one wonders why darlings of the Left like Al Franken are being forgiven so quickly). If only liberals had a principled means of applying shame, we might actually be able to cooperate on a vision of the common good for all Americans.

Vet Turned Referee Walked Out After Athlete Kneels, is Suspended for 18 Months

JIM SADDLER. OUT OF A JOB FOR NEXT 18 MONTHS

His anger has gotten Jim Saddler in trouble. As the Kennedy family allegedly used to say: Don’t get mad, get even.

Indy Star

INDIANAPOLIS – Jim Saddler is sorry. That’s the first thing he wants you to know. Not sorry for being angry — he’s still pretty angry — but for the way he handled his anger when he saw a volleyball player kneeling during the national anthem. As an Indiana High School Athletic Association licensed official for more than two decades, he knows he has an obligation to honor his commitments.

It’s just like being in the military, the Air Force veteran said.

“In the Air Force, you have a duty, and you do it,” Saddler, a retired Presidential Flight Attendant on Air Force One, told IndyStar on Thursday. “The same with sporting events. I guess I went AWOL. I feel bad about it.”

But in the heat of the moment, the 67-year-old Carmel resident and Indiana Pacers usher couldn’t help himself. As a veteran and someone with many friends who lost their lives defending this country, he has little tolerance for people he thinks are disrespecting them or what they died for.

That’s why when he saw a North Central girls varsity volleyball player kneeling before an Oct. 9 match he was supposed to line judge, he couldn’t stay and do his duty.

He was barely able to contain his anger when he saw fans “sitting on their butts” during the national anthem, but once he saw the player on a knee, he had to leave.

Saddler calmly walked to the scorer’s bench, turned in his flag, then approached the North Central coach to inform him why he couldn’t stay.

As he was walking out, Saddler said, North Central assistant athletic director Andy Elkins shouted to him.

“You have a contract!” Saddler said Elkins hollered. Elkins then reminded Saddler that he was walking out on high school kids and that he had been paid $20 to line judge the game.

Saddler walked over to Elkins, handed him $20 and left.

He’s regretted it ever since.

“What they did just upset me so badly that I just could not stay there,” Saddler said.” (But) I know it’s her constitutional right to do what she wants to do. And it wasn’t fair to the other girls who were standing and respecting the flag. After I thought about it, you know, sometimes it takes you a little time to sit down and think about stuff and what you did. And after I thought about it, I would never ever do that again. I would never break a contract.”

Elkins could not be reached for comment, but North Central athletic director Paul Loggan, who has spoken with Elkins since the incident, confirmed Saddler’s story except for saying he did not know whether Elkins had raised his voice.

Loggan said Elkins told him that Saddler was “very professional” and that he did not lose his temper with any players, coaches or fans.

A few days later, Saddler received a letter from IHSAA Commissioner Bobby Cox informing him that his license had been revoked for the rest of this school year and until winter sports begin next year.

Cox confirmed the suspension with IndyStar but declined to comment further for this story.

Saddler, who also officiates softball and basketball, said the letter shocked him. He had expected to be reprimanded, maybe even suspended for a few games or until the end of year, but a year-and-a-half? That seemed excessive to him.

Saddler said that he’s never been in trouble with the IHSAA before and that as far as he knows, he’s a well-respected, well-liked official in Indiana.

Loggan confirmed as much.

“He’s a very well-respected official and man,” the North Central AD said. “He’s been a volleyball official here and a softball official here, and we’ve never had any issues with him.”

Jim confused sports fans with patriots. They’re not. They’re Negro worshipers. Jim offended the Negro gods and they have spoken.

He should walk away from sports and join a Neo-Nazi skinhead group instead. Any group listed by the SPLC as a hate group will do.

Judge Susan Bolton Screws Sheriff Joe Arpaio One More Time–Denies Conviction Erasure

In Texas a person convicted of certain crimes can have his conviction expunged if he stays out of trouble and pays the state a hefty fee.

I’m not sure about Arizona, where Sheriff Joe is based. But he’s looking to have his conviction erased.

His lawyers will have to figure out the next steps to take. The man would never have been convicted were it not for vindictive liberal judge Susan Bolton.

Tucson

Saying the president can’t erase facts, a federal judge on Thursday rejected a bid by former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio to have all record of his criminal conviction wiped out.

Susan Bolton said she already dismissed the criminal contempt case against Arpaio following the decision by President Trump to issue a pardon. That saved the former sheriff, who had been found guilty, from the possibility of going to jail for up to six months.

But Bolton rebuffed Arpaio’s claim that the pardon also entitled him to have the entire conviction erased.

“The power to pardon is an executive prerogative of mercy, not of judicial record-keeping,” Bolton wrote, quoting earlier court precedent.

“The pardon undoubtedly spared defendant from any punishment that might otherwise have been imposed,” the judge continued. “It did not, however, revise the historical facts of this case.”

Arpaio, however, is not willing to simply enjoy his freedom.

“It’s not going to be dropped,” he told Capitol Media Services.

Jack Wilenchik, one of his attorneys, said the relief the sheriff is seeking is important.

He said Arpaio intended to appeal his conviction, if for no other reason than Bolton had said he was not entitled to a jury trial. Wilenchik said he believes Arpaio would have won.

But now, with the pardon, there’s no opportunity to appeal, meaning the record of the conviction remains. And that, he said would be something that could be used against the former sheriff in any future criminal or civil case.

OBSERVE THE FAMOUS PINK UNDERWEAR IN JOE’S JAIL.

The conviction stems from the years’ old case filed against Arpaio and the department he led, accusing the agency of having policies of stopping motorists who look like they might be in the country illegally, whether or not they had violated any state laws. Deputies then would hand the people over to federal immigration officials.

U.S. District Judge Murray Snow found Arpaio and the department guilty of illegal racial profiling and he ordered it to stop. Snow later concluded the department violated his orders and referred Arpaio, two aides and a former attorney for charges of criminal contempt.

The Department of Justice, then under President Obama, decided to pursue only Arpaio. And Bolton, who handled that case, used his own words and press releases to show he intentionally ignored Snow’s orders.

But before he could be sentenced, Trump interceded. And Bolton concluded that ended the case.

Wilenchik, however, said that’s not enough.

He said the conviction should be nullified. And Wilenchik said Bolton is misstating his arguments in asking that any evidence of the case against Arpaio be wiped out.

“We’re not asking to undo facts,” he said.

“We’re not asking for expungement,” Wilenchik continued. “There’s no such thing in federal law.”

What Wilenchik said he does want is a recognition that the case is now legally moot. He said it’s no different than if someone dies before sentencing or having a chance to appeal.

“The whole case gets undone,” he said, with the conviction nullified.

But Bolton said that’s not the way things work. She said the right of the president to pardon the former sheriff is different — and separate from — what actually occurred in court.

More to the point, she said what Arpaio wants ignores the legal nature of a pardon.

First, she said, it must be accepted. At that point, Bolton wrote, the defendant is no longer subject to punishment and all of his or her civil rights are restored.

“It does not erase a judgment of conviction, or its underlying legal and factual findings,” Bolton said. In fact, the judge said there is case law showing that a pardon carries an imputation of guilt — and that acceptance is “a confession of it.”

In this case, Bolton said, Trump issued the pardon and Arpaio accepted it. And as she reads the law, that ends the case, but does not entitle the former sheriff to have his underlying conviction wiped out.

That conviction apparently has not dimmed the former sheriff’s political pull. On Thursday, when contacted by Capitol Media Services, he was in California, campaigning on behalf of congressional candidate Omar Navarro who hopes to unseat incumbent Democrat Maxine Waters.

Saying the president can’t erase facts, a federal judge this afternoon rejected a bid by former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio to have all records of his criminal conviction wiped out.

Susan Bolton said she already dismissed the criminal contempt case against Arpaio following the decision by President Trump to issue a pardon. That saved the former sheriff, who had been found guilty, from the possibility of going to jail.

But Bolton rebuffed Arpaio’s claim that the pardon also entitled him to have the entire conviction erased.

“The power to pardon is an executive prerogative of mercy, not of judicial record-keeping,” Bolton wrote, quoting earlier court precedent.

“The pardon undoubtedly spared defendant from any punishment that might otherwise have been imposed,” the judge continued. “It did not, however, revise the historical facts of this case.”