Inspirational VIDEO Quote of the Day: You’ll Never Walk Alone (Video)

Dedicated to our British working class friends.

Wikipedia

Gerry and the Pacemakers were an English beat group prominent in the 1960s Merseybeat scene. In common with the Beatles, they came from Liverpool, were managed by Brian Epstein, and were recorded by George Martin.[1]

They are most remembered for being the first act to reach number one in the UK Singles Chart with their first three single releases: “How Do You Do It?”, “I Like It” and “You’ll Never Walk Alone”.[2] This record was not equalled for 20 years,[2] until the mid-1980s success of fellow Liverpool band Frankie Goes to Hollywood. Consequently, they stand as the second most successful pop group originating in Liverpool. Another of their most famous songs, “Ferry Cross the Mersey”, refers to the River Mersey that flows into Liverpool.

Lyrics:

You’ll Never Walk Alone
Gerry and the Pacemakers

When you walk through a storm
Hold your head up high
And don’t be afraid of the dark

At the end of a storm
There’s a golden sky
And the sweet silver song of a lark

Walk on through the wind
Walk on through the rain
Though your dreams be tossed and blown

Walk on, walk on
With hope in your heart
And you’ll never walk alone

You’ll never walk alone

Walk on, walk on
With hope in your heart
And you’ll never walk alone

You’ll never walk alone

Songwriters: Oscar Hammerstein Ii / Richard Rodgers
You’ll Never Walk Alone lyrics © Imagem Music Inc

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Movie Star William Holden

Wikipedia

William Holden (born William Franklin Beedle, Jr.; April 17, 1918 – November 12, 1981) was an American actor who was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1950s through the 1970s. He won the Academy Award for Best Actor in 1953 for his role in Stalag 17, and a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor for his role in the 1973 television film The Blue Knight.

Holden starred in some of Hollywood’s most popular and critically acclaimed films, including such classics as Sunset Boulevard, Sabrina, The Bridge on the River Kwai, The Wild Bunch, Picnic, and Network. He was named one of the “Top 10 Stars of the Year” six times (1954–1958, 1961), and appeared as 25th on the American Film Institute’s list of 25 greatest male stars of Classic Hollywood Cinema.

Holden maintained a home in Switzerland and also spent much of his time working for wildlife conservation as a managing partner in an animal preserve in Africa. His Mount Kenya Safari Club in Nanyuki (founded 1959) became a mecca for the international jet set.[35] On a trip to Africa, he fell in love with the wildlife and became increasingly concerned with the animal species that were beginning to decrease in population. With the help of his partners, he created the Mount Kenya Game Ranch and inspired the creation of the William Holden Wildlife Foundation.[36] The Mount Kenya Game Ranch works to assist in Kenya with the wildlife education of its youth.[37] Within the Mount Kenya Game Ranch, is the Mount Kenya Conservancy which runs an animal orphanage as well as the Bongo Rehabilitation Program in collaboration with the Kenya Wildlife Service. The orphanage provides shelter and care for orphans, injured and neglected animals found in the wild, with the aim of releasing these animals back into the wild whenever possible. The conservancy is home to the critically endangered East African mountain bongo, and aims to prevent its extinction by breeding.[38][39]

Here’s a great moment in Oscar history featuring Bill Holden:

What a class act!

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by George Lincoln Rockwell

Wikipedia

George Lincoln Rockwell (March 9, 1918 – August 25, 1967) was a United States Navy commander, noted for being the founder of the American Nazi Party.[1]

On August 25, 1967, Rockwell was murdered by a former member of his own group while leaving a laundromat in Arlington, Virginia.[1][2][3]

In order to attract media attention, Rockwell held a rally on April 3, 1960, on the National Mall of Washington, D.C., where he addressed the crowd with a two-hour long speech. The second rally was to be held at Union Square in New York City. Mayor Robert Wagner refused to grant him a permit to speak, and he appealed that decision to the New York Supreme Court. Jewish war veterans and Holocaust survivors gathered to oppose his appeal and, during a court recess, when Rockwell emerged in the courthouse rotunda he was surrounded by a crowd of television reporters. One of the reporters, Reese Schonfeld, asked Rockwell how he would treat Jews if he came to power in the United States. Rockwell replied by stating that he would treat Jews just as he treated all other American citizens. If they were loyal Americans, everything would be fine; if they were traitors, they would be executed. When Schonfeld asked Rockwell what percentage of Jews he perceived were traitors, Rockwell replied, “Ninety percent.”[16] The Jewish war veterans and Holocaust survivors rioted and began beating Rockwell and the reporter with their umbrellas, and Rockwell was escorted out of the courthouse rotunda in the midst of a police convoy. Rockwell, with the aid of the ACLU, eventually won his permit, but it was long after the date of the planned event.[17]

Inspirational Quote of the Day: Big Chutzpah by Henry Kissinger

Hmmm. That attitude explains a lot. I guess I’m inspired to disgust by this maggot’s words.

Inspirational Video Quote of the Day: One by Clint Eastwood

Inspirational Quote of the Day: Ron Paul on the Jews

PJ Media, cuckservative to liberal news site, labeled Ron Paul the fifth worst antisemite in America.

You might call that PJ Media piece damage control. We wouldn’t want the goyim to hear the truth, so we’ll just scream “Antisemitism!.”

Inspirational Video of the Day: Desiderata

Spoken by Les Crane. Released in 1971. Less than 5 minutes.

From youtube:

Crane is a San Francisco TV talk show host and husband of Tina Louise, who played “Ginger” on Gilligan’s Island. The Rolling Stones made their American television debut on The Les Crane Show on June 2, 1964.

According to the liner notes for the album, “Desiderata” was a poem written in 1906 and copyrighted under the title “Go Placidly Amid the Noise and Haste” in 1927 by Max Ehrmann, an Indiana lawyer. It was about the search for happiness in life. In the 1960s, the poem made its rounds around hippiedom as “anonymous” ancient wisdom – it was widely reprinted because most people assumed it was in the public domain. Crane read the poem on a street poster (which stated the words “Found in Old Saint Paul’s Church, Baltimore, dated 1692”) and decided to record it.

The musical background was by Fred Werner, who found the poster in a Los Angeles store.

This won the Grammy for Best Spoken Word Recording in 1971.
The first recording of the poem was by the UK group Every Which Way in 1970 as “Child of the Universe.” (thanks, Brad Wind – Miami, FL, for all above)

National Lampoon parodied this on the album Radio Dinner as “Deteriorata.” It starts: “You are a fluke of the universe, you have no right to be here…” The parody featured Melissa Manchester as one of the background singers.

The title is in Latin. It means “something desired as essential.”

This was Crane’s only hit. He later moved into the computer software field. (thanks, Edward Pearce – Ashford, Kent, England, for above 2)