Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Movie Star Tough Guy George Raft

Wikipedia

George Raft (born George Ranft; September 26, 1901 – November 24, 1980) was an American film actor and dancer identified with portrayals of gangsters in crime melodramas of the 1930s and 1940s. A stylish leading man in dozens of movies, today Raft is mostly known for his gangster roles in the original Scarface (1932), Each Dawn I Die (1939), and Billy Wilder’s 1959 comedy Some Like it Hot, as a dancer in Bolero (1934), and a truck driver in They Drive by Night (1940).[1]

Raft said he never regarded himself as an actor. “I wanted to be me,” he said.[2]

At the end of 1934 Raft was listed in a survey of theatre managers as among Paramount’s secondary tier of stars “if properly cast”. Mae West and Bing Crosby were on top; others on Raft’s level included The Marx Brothers, Carole Lombard, Marlene Dietrich, Claudette Colbert, Gary Cooper, and W.C. Fields.[39]

Raft received an offer from Andy Neatrour to work as a host and part owner of a gambling club in London, the Colony Club. Raft went there in 1966.[80] While in there he had parts in several movies, including a cameo in 1967’s James Bond spoof Casino Royale, a French film with Jean Gabin The Upper Hand (1966) and Five Golden Dragons (1967). The club was a success. However after he went to the US for a short holiday he was banned from re-entering London in 1967 as an “undesirable”.[10]

Raft was interviewed by FBI agents in 1938 and 1953. The 1938 interview was about his knowledge of Louis Lepke Buchalter and Jacob Shapiro.[85]
Raft was investigated for tax evasion in 1942.[86]
In 1944 Raft’s name was mentioned in connection with an illegal dice game.
In 1944 he gave evidence when Bugsy Siegel was on trial for bookmaking.[87]
In 1946 Raft was sued by an attorney for assault.[88]
Raft was present with Bugsy Siegel in 1946 when the latter was arrested for bookmaking. Raft attended the opening of the Flamingo Hotel.
In 1953 Raft vouched for John Capone when he got out of prison.
In 1967, Raft was denied entry into the UK (where he had been installed as casino director at a casino known as the “Colony Club”) due to his underworld associations.[89]

Raft died from leukemia at the age of 79 in Los Angeles, California, on November 24, 1980. Two days earlier, Mae West had died, and their bodies were at one point alongside each other in the hallway of the mortuary for a coincidental silent reunion almost half a century after their first film together.

Raft left behind no will. His estate consisted of a $10,000 insurance policy and some furniture. In the last years of his life he had mainly lived on $800 a month, a combination of social security and his pension. [90]

Watch George Raft in Outpost in Morocco.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: Mel Gibson on the Greatest Power of the Human Mind

Mel Gibson seems to be one of us. Read on.

Wikipedia

Mel Colmcille Gerard Gibson AO (born January 3, 1956) is an American actor and filmmaker. He was born in Peekskill, New York, and moved with his parents to Sydney, Australia, when he was 12 years old.

Gibson is best known as an action hero, for roles such as Martin Riggs in the Lethal Weapon buddy cop film series, and Max Rockatansky in the first three films in the Mad Max post-apocalyptic action series.

He studied acting at the Australian National Institute of Dramatic Art. During the 1980s, he founded Icon Entertainment, a production company which independent film director Atom Egoyan has called, “an alternative to the studio system”.[2] Director Peter Weir cast him as one of the leads in the critically acclaimed World War I drama Gallipoli (1981), which earned Gibson a Best Actor Award from the Australian Film Institute.[3] The film also helped to earn Gibson the reputation of a serious, versatile actor.

Gibson produced, directed, and starred in the epic historical drama film Braveheart (1995), for which he won the Golden Globe Award and Academy Award for Best Director, along with the Academy Award for Best Picture. He later directed and produced the financially successful and controversial, biblical drama film The Passion of the Christ (2004). He received further critical notice for his directorial work of the action-adventure film Apocalypto (2006), which is set in Mesoamerica during the early 16th century. After a 10-year hiatus from directing, Gibson returned with the critically praised and financially successful Hacksaw Ridge (2016), which won the Academy Awards for Best Sound Mixing and Best Film Editing[4][5] and earned Gibson his second nomination for Best Director.

According to the arrest report, Gibson exploded into an angry tirade when the arresting officer would not allow him to drive home. Gibson climaxed with the words, “Fucking Jews… the Jews are responsible for all the wars in the world. Are you a Jew?”[188][189] The arresting Sheriff’s Deputy, James Mee, was Jewish.[190]

After the arrest report was leaked on TMZ.com, Gibson issued two apologies through his publicist,[191] and—in a televised interview with Diane Sawyer—he affirmed the accuracy of the quotations.[192] He further apologized for his “despicable” behavior, saying that the comments were “blurted out in a moment of insanity”,[193] and asked to meet with Jewish leaders to help him “discern the appropriate path for healing.”[194] After Gibson’s arrest, his publicist said he had entered a recovery program to battle alcoholism.

The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) accused Gibson of homophobia after a December 1991 interview in the Spanish newspaper El País in which he made derogatory comments about homosexuals.[66][199] Gibson later defended his comments[66] and rejected calls to apologize even as he faced fresh accusations of homophobia in the wake of his film Braveheart.[173] However, Gibson joined GLAAD in hosting 10 lesbian and gay filmmakers for an on-location seminar on the set of the movie Conspiracy Theory in January 1997.[200] In 1999 when asked about the comments to El País, Gibson said, “I shouldn’t have said it, but I was tickling a bit of vodka during that interview, and the quote came back to bite me on the ass.”[174]

In July 2010, Gibson had been recorded during a phone call with Oksana Grigorieva suggesting that if she got “raped by a pack of niggers,” she would be to blame.[201][202][203][204] Gibson was barred from coming near Grigorieva or their daughter due to a domestic violence-related restraining order.[201] The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department launched a domestic violence investigation against Gibson,[131] later dropped when Gibson pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor battery charge.[136]

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Movie Star Tyrone Power

Wikipedia

Tyrone Edmund Power III[1][2] (May 5, 1914 – November 15, 1958) was an American film, stage and radio actor. From the 1930s to the 1950s Power appeared in dozens of films, often in swashbuckler roles or romantic leads. His better-known films include The Mark of Zorro, Blood and Sand, The Black Swan, Prince of Foxes, Witness For The Prosecution, The Black Rose, and Captain from Castile. Power’s own favorite film among those that he starred in was Nightmare Alley.[3]

Though largely a matinee idol in the 1930s and early 1940s and known for his striking looks, Power starred in films in a number of genres, from drama to light comedy. In the 1950s he began placing limits on the number of films he would make in order to devote more time for theater productions. He received his biggest accolades as a stage actor in John Brown’s Body and Mister Roberts. Power died from a heart attack at the age of 44.

Tyrone Power was a pilot during World War II. He saw action in the Pacific.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Movie Star Bette Davis

Wikipedia

Ruth Elizabeth “Bette” Davis (April 5, 1908 – October 6, 1989) was an American actress of film, television, and theater. Regarded as one of the greatest actresses in Hollywood history,[2] she was noted for her willingness to play unsympathetic, sardonic characters and was reputed for her performances in a range of film genres, from contemporary crime melodramas to historical and period films and occasional comedies, although her greatest successes were her roles in romantic dramas.[3]

MSN

Davis’ biological daughter Barbara “B.D.” Hyman released her own damaging tale, “My Mother’s Keeper,” in 1985. It portrayed the actress as a ruthless bully who faked attempted suicides for sympathy.

Hyman released her story on Mother’s Day, just months after Davis underwent a mastectomy and suffered a stroke that nearly killed her.

Kathryn Sermak, who served as Davis’ personal assistant from 1979 until her death in 1989, told Fox News the publication left Davis so humiliated she didn’t want to live anymore.

“It was a huge betrayal,” said Sermak. “Miss D never got over it. Never. You don’t just get over something like that… But that doesn’t mean you stop loving the person. It was so horrible… Even with all of that, Miss D said, ‘She’s still my daughter.’ But it broke her heart forever. You don’t get over that.”

More here.

WITH DAUGHTER IN 1965.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Al Capone on Kindness

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Movie Star William Holden

Wikipedia

William Holden (born William Franklin Beedle, Jr.; April 17, 1918 – November 12, 1981) was an American actor who was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1950s through the 1970s. He won the Academy Award for Best Actor in 1953 for his role in Stalag 17, and a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor for his role in the 1973 television film The Blue Knight.

Holden starred in some of Hollywood’s most popular and critically acclaimed films, including such classics as Sunset Boulevard, Sabrina, The Bridge on the River Kwai, The Wild Bunch, Picnic, and Network. He was named one of the “Top 10 Stars of the Year” six times (1954–1958, 1961), and appeared as 25th on the American Film Institute’s list of 25 greatest male stars of Classic Hollywood Cinema.

Holden maintained a home in Switzerland and also spent much of his time working for wildlife conservation as a managing partner in an animal preserve in Africa. His Mount Kenya Safari Club in Nanyuki (founded 1959) became a mecca for the international jet set.[35] On a trip to Africa, he fell in love with the wildlife and became increasingly concerned with the animal species that were beginning to decrease in population. With the help of his partners, he created the Mount Kenya Game Ranch and inspired the creation of the William Holden Wildlife Foundation.[36] The Mount Kenya Game Ranch works to assist in Kenya with the wildlife education of its youth.[37] Within the Mount Kenya Game Ranch, is the Mount Kenya Conservancy which runs an animal orphanage as well as the Bongo Rehabilitation Program in collaboration with the Kenya Wildlife Service. The orphanage provides shelter and care for orphans, injured and neglected animals found in the wild, with the aim of releasing these animals back into the wild whenever possible. The conservancy is home to the critically endangered East African mountain bongo, and aims to prevent its extinction by breeding.[38][39]

Here’s a great moment in Oscar history featuring Bill Holden:

What a class act!

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Actor William Powell

In the 1930s William Powell beat cancer and lived almost another 50 years. Check out his full Wikipedia entry, which is excerpted below.

Wikipedia

William Horatio Powell (July 29, 1892 – March 5, 1984)[1] was an American actor. A major star at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, he was paired with Myrna Loy in 14 films, including the Thin Man series based on the Nick and Nora Charles characters created by Dashiell Hammett. Powell was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor three times: for The Thin Man (1934), My Man Godfrey (1936), and Life with Father (1947).

Powell died in Palm Springs, California, on March 5, 1984, at the age of 91, some 30 years after his retirement. He is buried at the Desert Memorial Park in Cathedral City, California, near his third wife Diana Lewis, and his only child, his son William David Powell.[1][7]

There are plenty of great old Bill Powell movies to watch on youtube.