Richard Spencer Leads Protest Outside White House Surrounded by Cops

RICHARD SPENCER LOOKING DAPPER IN SUNGLASSES, SCARF, AND CAP.

I went to the Daily Mail in order to down vote the anti-white comments and up vote the pro-white comments.

Daily Mail

Police were on alert Sunday afternoon after a small group of self-proclaimed ‘alt-right’ protesters led by white nationalist Richard Spencer gathered in front of the White House.

The group was met by a group of counter protesters and a heavy police presence.

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That Nice Nazi Next Door Featured by NY Times Has Been FIRED Along with Wife and Family

TONY HOVATOR, WIFE, BROTHER-IN-LAW ALL FIRED. FORCED TO MOVE.

If you’re ever tempted to self-dox and reveal your true identity on the Internet, don’t.

MSN

A Nazi sympathizer who was profiled recently in The New York Times and his wife and brother-in-law have lost their jobs, after the article prompted an outpouring of hostility to the restaurant that employed them, both he and the restaurant said.

The Times article depicted Tony Hovater, 29, as an otherwise unremarkable person who voices “casually approving remarks about Hitler, disdain for democracy and belief that the races are better off separate.” He is active in a group called the Traditionalist Workers Party; organizations that track extremist groups have called it a hate group, allied with neo-Nazis, and call its views white supremacist, a label it rejects.

Mr. Hovater, his wife, Maria, and her brother had worked at 571 Grill and Draft House, near their home in New Carlisle, Ohio, a suburb of Dayton. Mr. Hovater worked at the restaurant as a part-time cook for a little over a year, according to a manager there.

Though the Times article did not mention the restaurant — Mr. Hovater had identified himself as a welder by trade — people appalled by his views learned that he worked there and began calling and leaving online messages.

The manager, who asked that his name not be used out of fear for his safety, said that there were dozens of angry, crude and threatening messages and that employees were scared.

In a brief telephone interview, Mr. Hovater said, “they decided to can me.” In a text message exchange, Mr. Hovater added, “we’re moving because of safety reasons.”

The restaurant gave a slightly different account in a statement it released on Wednesday, saying that because of the threats, he “suggested that we release him from employment.”

Supporters have contributed more than $6,000 to the Hovaters through a site that caters to extremists on the right.

The (((Deep State))) allows its army of Jews, Negros, and white race traitors to do its dirty work. There’s no need to arrest and ship Tony off to a Gulag for holding the wrong political views. Just get him fired.

Remember that he’s a cat lover? I hope his cats are taken care of as he’s forced to adopt to a life of homelessness and permanent joblessness.

Under Attack: New York Times Defends Story About Nice White Nationalist Cat Lover Tony Hovator

TONY HOVATOR. JUST YOUR AVERAGE NAZI NEXT DOOR.

When I ran the New York Times condensation I did about Tony Hovator on Sunday, I mentioned that I thought people would take it as positive toward White Nationalism.

Well, I was right.

The New York Times is defending the piece on Tony, trying to make it clear that it wasn’t intended to be positive toward White Nationalism.

Yahoo

In the wake of widespread backlash against its profile of a Nazi sympathizer, The New York Times said on Sunday it regrets offending readers and defended elements of the story criticized as normalizing white extremism.

“Our reporter and his editors agonized over the tone and content of the article,” Times national editor Marc Lacey wrote in a response to readers. “The point of the story was not to normalize anything but to describe the degree to which hate and extremism have become far more normal in American life than many of us want to think.”

The story, which ran on Saturday, spotlighted white supremacist Tony Hovater of New Carlisle, Ohio. The portrait of the “Nazi sympathizer next door” and his hatred for Jews, admiration for Adolf Hitler and belief in racial segregation is told against the backdrop of him cooking pasta at home, contemplating his honeymoon and enjoying “Seinfeld” ― all details critics say inadvertently normalized people like Hovater.

In its response, the Times said some saw the value in using those details to show how easy it is for the average American to adopt such radical views. “People mad about this article want to believe that Nazis are monsters we cannot relate to,” the Times quoted from Mother Jones reporter Shane Bauer’s tweet.

The point of the story was not to normalize anything but to describe the degree to which hate and extremism have become far more normal in American life than many of us want to think. New York Times national editor Marc Lacey

Many critics of the profile agreed with that sentiment, but also said the Times went wrong by failing to address why and how Hovater developed his extreme beliefs.

Richard Fausset, the profile’s author, admitted in a followup piece Saturday that those unasked questions about Hovater were “a hole at the heart of [his] story.” When a Times editor told him that, in a first draft, those questions “had not been sufficiently addressed,” Fausset returned for more reporting on Hovater in search of answers, but came up empty.

“I beat myself up about all of this for a while, until I decided that the unfilled hole would have to serve as both feature and defect,” Fausset wrote. The Times’ response on Sunday, however, does not directly address this shortcoming or its decision to publish the story despite it.

“We recognize that people can disagree on how best to tell a disagreeable story,” the Times said in conclusion. “What we think is indisputable, though, is the need to shed more light, not less, on the most extreme corners of American life and the people who inhabit them. That’s what the story, however imperfectly, tried to do.”

The Times did say it erred in judgment by including in the profile a link to a site that sells swastika armbands.

“This was intended to show the darker reality beyond the anodyne language of the website. But we saw the criticism, agreed and removed the link.”

Commenter Bill left this at Yahoo, which is some nice pushback, even if it doesn’t mention Jews:

What about the black nurses who laughed (and neglected) the white WW2 veteran who just died in a nursing home (it’s on video)? What about the black “Night Nurse” who said that white women are raising “killers and rapists” on her twitter account? Are we going to see stories profiling that absolute disdain that many blacks have for the white race, simply because they are white (and because it’s easier to point the finger at an “oppressor” that is keeping you down rather than to look in the mirror and see the reality is that you are a loser in life)? Probably not!

I’ve put more perceptive comments from Yahoo behind the “continue reading” button:

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NY Times Interviews “A Voice of Hate in America’s Heartland”

TONY HOVATOR. JUST A NORMAL GUY AWAKENED TO THE TRUTH THAT DEMOCRACY DOESN’T WORK.

The New York Times has published an article featuring a White Nationalist young man, the very articulate Tony Hovater, whose life is boringly normal. While he has no dog, he does have cats and a new bride, who shares his belief in White Nationalism.

On the surface, the Times paints a sympathetic picture of Tony. But I’m willing to bet that the cues in the article would leave most white people thinking of Tony as a loser. By that psyop, the Times surely hopes to discourage others in his generation from joining the movement.

I’ve taken the 2,400 word article and condensed it to 1,600 words. I’ve also omitted two of the pictures from this condensation. A reminder: The NY Times allows you to read 10 free articles a month. After that you hit a paywall.

New York Times

HUBER HEIGHTS, Ohio —

In Ohio, amid the row crops and rolling hills, the Olive Gardens and Steak ’n Shakes, Mr. Hovater’s presence can make hardly a ripple. He is the Nazi sympathizer next door, polite and low-key at a time the old boundaries of accepted political activity can seem alarmingly in flux. Most Americans would be disgusted and baffled by his casually approving remarks about Hitler, disdain for democracy and belief that the races are better off separate. But his tattoos are innocuous pop-culture references: a slice of cherry pie adorns one arm, a homage to the TV show “Twin Peaks.” He says he prefers to spread the gospel of white nationalism with satire. He is a big “Seinfeld” fan.

“I guess it seems weird when talking about these type of things,” he says. “You know, I’m coming at it in a mid-90s, Jewish, New York, observational-humor way.”

Mr. Hovater, 29, is a welder by trade. He is not a star among the resurgent radical American right so much as a committed foot soldier — an organizer, an occasional podcast guest on a website called Radio Aryan, and a self-described “social media villain,” although, in person, his Midwestern manners would please anyone’s mother. In 2015, he helped start the Traditionalist Worker Party, one of the extreme right-wing groups that marched in Charlottesville, Va., in August, and again at a “White Lives Matter” rally last month in Tennessee. The group’s stated mission is to “fight for the interests of White Americans.’’

Its leaders claim to oppose racism, though the Anti-Defamation League says the group “has participated in white supremacist events all over the country.” On its website, a swastika armband goes for $20.

If the Charlottesville rally came as a shock, with hundreds of white Americans marching in support of ideologies many have long considered too vile, dangerous or stupid to enter the political mainstream, it obscured the fact that some in the small, loosely defined alt-right movement are hoping to make those ideas seem less than shocking for the “normies,” or normal people, that its sympathizers have tended to mock online.

And to go from mocking to wooing, the movement will be looking to make use of people like the Hovaters and their trappings of normie life — their fondness for National Public Radio, their four cats, their bridal registry.

“We need to have more families. We need to be able to just be normal,” said Matthew Heimbach, the leader of the Traditionalist Worker Party, in a podcast conversation with Mr. Hovater. Why, he asked self-mockingly, were so many followers “abnormal”?

Mr. Hovater replied: “I mean honestly, it takes people with, like, sort of an odd view of life, at first, to come this way. Because most people are pacified really easy, you know. Like, here’s some money, here’s a nice TV, go watch your sports, you know?”

He added: “The fact that we’re seeing more and more normal people come is because things have gotten so bad. And if they keep getting worse, we’ll keep getting more, just, normal people.”

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British Guardian: Tennessee White Lives Matter Rally Passes Quietly

RALLY PARTICIPANTS.

COUNTERPROTESTERS.

What happened in Tennessee on Saturday at the two White Lives Matter rallies?

Not much from the point of view of the left, which would have reveled in having a dead body to parade around the media.

The significance of the event is that at least some people who followed this story out of curiosity got to hear white people talking about the importance of race.

This post condenses the liberal British Guardian’s coverage of the rally and adds nine Tweets that offer short videos that cover some of the significant moments.

Excerpt from The Guardian

White nationalists were heavily outnumbered by around 600 counter-protesters during a Saturday afternoon “White Lives Matter” rally in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, that passed off uneventfully after police kept the two groups separated.

At around 3pm, a small group of white nationalists left the city’s public square. Counter-protesters, who had lined routes into town chanting “Murfreesboro loves”, “refugees are welcome here” and “this is what democracy looks like”, chanted “black lives matter” and “na na na na goodbye”.

Murfreesboro city officials, who had been anticipating a large number of white nationalists coming into the area, said the rally had been “without reports of incident”.

Earlier in the day, another rally was held in nearby Shelbyville. Police said one counterprotester was arrested and cited for disorderly conduct after he exhibited “threatening behavior”. Shelbyville police lieutenant Brian Crews told the Tennessean that besides that, “everything went lovely”.

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Asian Teacher Who Punched a Neo-Nazi Says It Isn’t a Crime

YVETTE FELARCA. VIOLENT LOON.

In general, courts do not like novel legal theories.

Professional agitator Yvette Felarca has proposed a novel legal theory. If you violently attack a person that she considers to be a fascist, then all is well since you’ve done nothing criminal.

In all honesty, this Filipina (or whatever ethnicity she is) may pick up one paycheck from the public school system, but she surely picks up cash on the side from her gig as a loud-mouthed agitator for Communist causes. Soros money?

Huffington Post

A middle school teacher in Berkeley, California, accused of punching a neo-Nazi during a 2016 protest is arguing that standing up to fascism is not a crime.

Yvette Felarca, 47, was arrested last month for her involvement in a June 2016 anti-fascist demonstration held in Sacramento.

Felarca, who is a member of an activist group called By Any Means Necessary (BAMN), has been charged with felony assault, as well as two misdemeanor counts of inciting and participating in a riot, according to KPIX TV.

Footage of the demonstration appears to show Felarca repeatedly punching a member of the Traditionalist Worker Party, a white nationalist group described as ”a front for neo-Nazi sympathizers” by ABC 10. The taller man is holding up his hands while trying to get police officers to help. Other protesters drag the man to the ground before the police intervene.

At her arraignment last week, Felarca told the court that the charges against her are false and should be dropped.

“Standing up against fascism and the rise of Nazism and fascism in this country is not a crime,” she said. “We have the right to defend ourselves.”

Back in 2016, Felarca told reporters that the goal of the demonstration was to “shut down the Nazi scum.”

“They are organizing to attack and kill us,” she said at the time, according to Al Jazeera. “So we have a right to self-defense. … That is why we have to shut them down by any means necessary.”

Felarca told the Los Angeles Times back then that her group’s protest was a success because it chased away the neo-Nazis and kept them from recruiting new members.

Felarca’s next scheduled court date is Oct. 4.

She is scheduled to teach at her Berkeley middle school when the students return later this month and cannot be legally fired unless she is convicted of a felony, according to KPIX TV.

Tucker was a little off his game in this interview with Felarca.

Read an earlier saboteur post on BAMN and Felarca here.

BAMN TATTOO.

Judge: Trump Incited Violence Against Protesters At Kentucky Rally

UNPINNED 4/3. PINNED TO THE TOP OF THE HOMEPAGE APRIL 3, 2017. SCROLL DOWN FOR NEWEST POSTS.

YOU CAN SPOT THE PROTESTER BY HER MELANIN.

A judge has ruled that President Donald Trump incited a white mob to assault a black woman protester at one of his campaign rallies last year.

In all my years, I don’t think I’ve ever seen or heard such nonsense.

It’s all political. It’s being orchestrated by judges who have an ax to grind with President Trump. It’s being orchestrated by the SPLC, and ultimately George Soros.

As I’ve repeatedly written, there is no rule of law in America any more. There are only political hacks trying to overthrow the people, the white founding stock. That some of those trying to overthrow us are white makes it even worse.

Talking Points Memo

A federal judge in Kentucky is allowing a lawsuit by three protesters assaulted at a Donald Trump campaign rally last March to move forward, agreeing with the plaintiffs that Trump’s call from the podium for his supporters to “get ’em out of here” incited rally-goers to physically attack them.

The three protesters have sued Trump for incitement, vicarious liability, negligence, gross negligence, and recklessness.

The opinion, from U.S. District Judge David J. Hale of the Western District of Kentucky, denied most of Trump’s motion to dismiss the charges, saying that his angry demand for the removal of the protesters was “particularly reckless.”

He cites testimony from one of the assailants—a known member of a white nationalist group—saying he began shoving the young African American woman protester after hearing Trump’s call to “get them out.”

A video of the incident went viral last year:

Though Trump’s lawyers argue his words were protected speech under the First Amendment, the court disagreed. “It is plausible that Trump’s direction to ‘get ’em out of here’ advocated the use of force,” Judge Hale wrote. “It was an order, an instruction, a command…Trump’s statement at least implicitly encouraged the use of violence or lawless action.”

The judge did not agree, however, that Trump should be held “vicariously liable” for his supporters’ physical assault. Hale noted that the men who attacked the protesters were not employed by the Trump campaign and were not under his direct control during the rally.

The term fake news has become a standard theme with us. Now the term fake judges should also be adopted. This lawsuit should have been dismissed.

David J. Hale is an Obama judge, according to Wikipedia.