Alex Jones Apologizes For Promoting ‘Pizzagate’

Fire up the troops and then pull the rug out from underneath them.

Isn’t that a strategy that controlled opposition would use to demoralize the troops?

That’s what alex Jones has just done.

Interestingly, leftist Raw Story reports that the 60 Minutes interview with Mike Cernovich on Sunday night (see my earlier post on Cernovich by scrolling down the homepage) included a segment where 60 Minutes tries to debunk #pizzagate.

First, the story.

WBUR

Longtime conspiracy theorist and propagator Alex Jones has apologized to the Washington, D.C. pizzeria Comet Ping Pong and its owner James Alefantis for his show’s role in promoting the false “pizzagate” conspiracy theory involving a child sex-abuse ring.

Jones, the host of the radio and web show bearing his name and the owner of the website Infowars, said from a prepared statement that to his knowledge, “neither Mr. Alefantis, nor his restaurant Comet Ping Pong, were involved in any human trafficking as was part of the theories about Pizzagate that were being written about in many media outlets and which we commented upon.”

He continued: “I want our viewers and listeners to know that we regret any negative impact our commentaries may have had on Mr. Alefantis, Comet Ping Pong, or its employees. We apologize to the extent our commentaries could be construed as negative statements about Mr. Alefantis or Comet Ping Pong, and we hope that anyone else involved in commenting on Pizzagate will do the same thing.”

Jones’ apology Friday came the same day a 28-year-old man pleaded guilty to charges related to a December incident when he brought an AR-15 rifle and other weapons into the restaurant and fired shots inside. Edgar Maddison Welch, of Salisbury, N.C., said he drove from his home to the Washington restaurant to “self-investigate” the conspiracy theory.

False rumors on the Internet included allegations that a child sex ring was operating out of the restaurant’s nonexistent basement and that it involved Hillary Clinton and her former campaign chairman John Podesta. Employees of Comet have received many threatening phone calls and have been the targets of online harassment and death threats.

The Daily Beast reported that Welch was a Facebook fan of Jones and Infowars, and Welch told The New York Times he had listened to Jones’ radio show.

Multiple times in the statement, Jones says that “many media outlets” were reporting on the theories; it could be seen as an attempt to minimize the role his show played in their promotion.

Despite Jones’ claim that the reason for the apology is because “we think it is the right thing to do,” it may have more to do with the perceived threat of legal action from Alefantis, who wrote to Jones in February asking for several retractions. The Washington Post’s Paul Farhi explains:

“Under Texas law, the Austin-based Jones had to retract or apologize for the stories by Friday — one full month after receiving Alefantis’s letter — to avoid exposing InfoWars to punitive damages in a libel suit.”

It’s rare for Jones to make a public apology. The Infowars website has a correction section. There are only two entries, of which the Comet apology is one.

Infowars describes the mission of Jones and the website as “seeking the truth and exposing the scientifically engineered lies of the globalists and their ultimate goal of enslaving humanity.”

NPR’s David Folkenflik noted other conspiracy theories Jones has discussed:

“Jones has claimed the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks were an inside job, that the deadly shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School was a hoax, and that President Obama would round up people into concentration camps.”

Jones was not the originator of “pizzagate,” however, which has spread on social media and on sites like Reddit.

Even after its wide debunking by most mainstream media outlets, “pizzagate” continues, as evidenced by the small group of protesters who gathered near the White House on Saturday:

The Hill’s Will Sommer reports that Jones’ apology isn’t enough to sway the hard-core believers:

Social psychology professor Viren Swami of Anglia Ruskin University told NPR’s Michel Martin that it’s hard to change someone’s belief once that person accepts a conspiracy theory. “We look for evidence that fits what we already know or what we already believe, and we try to avoid information or evidence that we either disagree with or that we know doesn’t fit with our perspective,” he said. “And if someone comes along and says, here’s the evidence, your natural tendency’s actually to rehearse arguments against that evidence.”

A lawsuit by Alefantis? That seems highly unlikely. It would expose things related to the John Podesta emails that Podesta would not want exposed.

Forget about the idea that #pizzagate has been debunked, as claimed in the article. For something to be debunked, there must be an investigation. There has been no investigation of the bizarre goings on at Comet pizza.

And why hasn’t Alefantis gone after David Seaman, the subject of an earlier post (scroll down on the homepage from this post). Seaman has brutally exposed the Podesta emails to a large audience of his followers.

If anything, Seaman has more street cred than Jones, who is widely seen as controlled opposition. Seaman suffers the same labeling, but his focus in life is almost solely on #pizzagate, unlike Jones who spreads himself across numerous issues.

White Girl Shoplifter Goes Ballistic on Male Negro Store Employee

The races are reversed from the usual situation in this encounter between a calm black male store employee holding an attractive, but hysterical white female shoplifter.

Watch the four minute encounter and decide who you side with.

I found this video to be painful to watch. I’m not quite sure why. I guess I don’t like seeing dysfunctional white people.

When the police arrive, the girl calms down IMMEDIATELY.

Maryland Judge Considers Forcing President Trump to Double “Refugee” (Dangerous Parasite) Inflow

There is no rule of LAW in America now. There are only political opinions of liberal judges who hate America–white and free America anyway.

As Rush Limbaugh has noted, we are on the verge of a Constitutional crisis. Either the Supreme Court steps in with some real law (not likely) or Trump risks being impeached and thrown out of office for defying these liberal judges.

Civil war, anyone?

Breitbart

A federal District Court judge in Maryland is considering whether he should order President Donald Trump to double the annual inflow of refugees up to 100,000 per year.

Any demand by the judge that the federal government airbus an extra 50,000 migrants — including many adherents of Islam’s sharia legal system — into American neighborhoods would be an unusual intervention into government roles normally left to the elected President and Congress.

If actually implemented, the judge’s plan also would be extremely expensive for Americans, because state and local communities subsidize each new immigrant with roughly $1,600 each per year for decades.

The judge who is at the heart of this case is Theodore Chuang. Learn more about the outrageously partisan Judge Chuang here.

JUDGE THEORDORE CHUANG. PUBLIC SAFETY DOESN’T MATTER TO HIM. HE’S GARBAGE.

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Trump border wall: Texans receiving letters about their land

President Trump moves forward on another campaign promise.

CBS News

Even before President Trump was inaugurated, U.S. citizens who own land along the border reportedly began receiving letters from the Justice Department informing them that the federal government wants their land to build a fence (i.e. the president’s border wall), that it intends to acquire their land and the amount of compensation the government is offering.

Yvette Salinas, a Texan whose ailing mother owns a small parcel of land with her siblings near the Rio Grande was informed by the “Declaration of Taking” letter sent by DOJ that her 1.2 acres was worth $2,900, according to a story in the Texas Observer. She told the Observer that the family’s 16 acres has been in her family for five generations. The government’s letter asks recipients to sign in order to receive compensation, acknowledge that they “do not have an interest” in the case or do not intend to make a claim. It doesn’t really say what landowners should do if, like Salinas, they don’t want to sell their land.

Salinas called the letter “scary” and said “you feel you have to sign.” Her family is consulting a lawyer about its next steps. If other border landowners have the same reluctance to sell as Salinas, the government may have a long battle ahead to secure all the land necessary for the wall, given that the federal government doesn’t own most of it. The nearly 2,000-mile southern border is composed of federal, state, tribal and private lands. There are 632 miles of federal or tribal land — 33 percent — and the other 67 percent, most of which is in Texas, is private or state-owned, according to the Government Accountability Office (GAO). The Washington Post points out that the president would need Congress to pass a bill to acquire the tribal lands for his wall.

Salinas is an obstructionist. She’s a Mexican. She’d rather see Texas land under Mexican government control. Her land is nearly worthless anyway. It’s maybe worth a thousand an acre.

Like many Caucasian families, my family never owned any land because we were dirt poor Southern tenant farmers. Salinas can keep her remaining 15 acres and be thankful that it’s not occupied by illegal Mexican squatters.

Orgasmgate: Vibrator Maker Secretly Tracked Use via Phone App

Liberals mocked Kellyanne Conway for using an example of a person’s microwave oven spying on him. Actually, whether what she said is true or not, any Internet connected product can spy on you–TV, refrigerator, etc.

Even a sexual device can be nosy, as this story alleges.

NPR

The makers of the We-Vibe, a line of vibrators that can be paired with an app for remote-controlled use, have reached a $3.75 million class action settlement with users following allegations that the company was collecting data on when and how the sex toy was used.

Standard Innovations, the Canadian manufacturer of the We-Vibe, does not admit any wrongdoing in the settlement finalized Monday.

The We-Vibe product line includes a number of Bluetooth-enabled vibrators that, when linked to the “We-Connect” app, can be controlled from a smartphone. It allows a user to vary rhythms, patterns and settings — or give a partner, in the room or anywhere in the world, control of the device.

Since the app was released in 2014, some observers have raised concerns that Internet-connected sex toys could be vulnerable to hacking. But the lawsuit doesn’t involve any outside meddling — instead, it centers on concerns that the company itself was tracking users’ sex lives.

The lawsuit was filed in federal court in Illinois in September. It alleges that — without customers’ knowledge — the app was designed to collect information about how often, and with what settings, the vibrator was used.

The lawyers for the anonymous plaintiffs contended that the app, “incredibly,” collected users’ email addresses, allowing the company “to link the usage information to specific customer accounts.”

Customers’ email addresses and usage data were transmitted to the company’s Canadian servers, the lawsuit alleges. When a We-Vibe was remotely linked to a partner, the connection was described as “secure,” but some information was also routed through We-Connect and collected, the lawsuit says.

The unhappy users allege in their lawsuit that they never agreed to the collection of this data. Standard Innovations maintains that users “consented to the conduct alleged” — but instead of taking the case to court, the company agreed to settle.

An estimated 300,000 people bought Bluetooth-enabled WeVibes, according to court documents, and about 100,000 of them used the app.

Under the terms of the settlement, anyone who bought an app-enabled vibrator can receive up to $199 dollars; anyone who actually connected it to the app can collect up to $10,000. The actual amount paid out will depend on how many people file claims; the company estimates people who bought the app will get around $40, and people who used the app around $500.

Here’s an X-rated demonstration of the thing.

Preet Bharara ‘fired’: A phony scandal created by an Obama appointee

PREET BHARARA. REFUSED TO RESIGN. “YOU’RE FIRED.” RUMOR: WANTS TO BE MAYOR OF NYC.

New York Mag is reporting that the purpose of the firing of U.S. Attorney for New York, Preet Bharaha, was to head off an investigation into Fox News.

Fox News, in the piece below, speaks the truth that all U.S. Attorneys are generally replaced when a new president takes office.

Preet is called out as a publicity hound, which he was. He’s the only U.S. Attorney most of us ever heard of. He made sure the press was aware that he was, like Muhammed Ali, the GREATEST.

Fox News

It should come as no surprise that an Obama political appointee (with the cooperation of the media) would try to create a phony scandal out of a routine event. With every new administration, the incoming president asks all U.S. attorneys appointed by the prior administration to resign. After all, they are political appointees, just like cabinet officials and the attorney general, other cabinet members and literally thousands of other jobs within the executive branch.

n 2009, President Barack Obama asked for the resignation of George W. Bush-appointed U.S. Attorneys. When he replaced virtually all of them, it was treated as nothing out of the ordinary. That’s because it wasn’t.

In March 1993 President Bill Clinton had Attorney General Janet Reno fire 93 of the 94 U.S. Attorneys appointed by the prior administration. (Only Michael Chertoff was retained, apparently at the request of Sen. Bill Bradley, D-N.J.) Again, there was no outrage over these firings.

Yet today, Preet Bharara, Obama’s U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, is being portrayed by some as a political martyr because he was “fired” after he refused the Trump administration’s request to resign along with the remaining 45 Obama appointees in the U.S. Attorney slots. The fuss being made about this is just as phony as the outrage ginned up in 2006 by political opponents of President George W. Bush. They were shocked, SHOCKED!, that Bush had dared replace eight U.S. Attorneys—all of whom had been appointed by… Bush himself.

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Now They Want Your DNA: New Mandatory Genetic Testing Law Proposed

All politics is fake. All of it is scripted by (((you know who.)))

In the battle to impose genetic testing on anyone who has a job, the Republicans are being portrayed as the bad guys, the Democrats the good guys.

It’s all Kabuki theater. It’s actors playing roles assigned to them.

The end game is wealth and power.

Here’s a new idea that is sure to enrich that certain group while allowing all manner of mischief to unfold as you either give your genes to them or pay a huge penalty.

Yahoo

A little-noticed bill moving through Congress would allow companies to require employees to undergo genetic testing or risk paying a penalty of thousands of dollars, and would let employers see that genetic and other health information.

Giving employers such power is now prohibited by legislation including the 2008 genetic privacy and nondiscrimination law known as GINA. The new bill gets around that landmark law by stating explicitly that GINA and other protections do not apply when genetic tests are part of a “workplace wellness” program.

The bill was approved by a House committee on Wednesday, with all 22 Republicans supporting it and all 17 Democrats opposed. It has been overshadowed by the debate over the House GOP proposal to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, but the genetic testing bill is expected to folded into a second ACA-related measure containing a grab-bag of provisions that do not affect federal spending, as the main bill does.

“What this bill would do is completely take away the protections of existing laws,” said Jennifer Mathis, director of policy and legal advocacy at the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, a civil rights group. In particular, privacy and other protections for genetic and health information in GINA and the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act “would be pretty much eviscerated,” she said.

Employers say they need the changes because those two landmark laws are “not aligned in a consistent manner” with laws about workplace wellness programs, as an employer group said in congressional testimony last week.

Employers got virtually everything they wanted for their workplace wellness programs during the Obama administration. The ACA allowed them to charge employees 50 percent more for health insurance if they declined to participate in the “voluntary” programs, which typically include cholesterol and other screenings; health questionnaires that ask about personal habits including plans to get pregnant; and sometimes weight loss and smoking cessation classes.

And in rules that Obama’s Equal Employment Opportunity Commission issued last year, a workplace wellness program counts as “voluntary” even if workers have to pay thousands of dollars more in premiums and deductibles if they don’t participate.

Despite those wins, the business community chafed at what it saw as the last obstacles to unfettered implementation of wellness programs: the genetic information and the disabilities laws. Both measures, according to congressional testimony last week by the American Benefits Council, “put at risk the availability and effectiveness of workplace wellness programs,” depriving employees of benefits like “improved health and productivity.” The Council represents Fortune 500 companies and other large employers that provide employee benefits. It did not immediately respond to questions about how lack of access to genetic information hampers wellness programs.

Rigorous studies by researchers not tied to the $8 billion wellness industry have shown that the programs improve employee health little if at all. An industry group recently concluded that they save so little on medical costs that, on average, the programs lose money. But employers continue to embrace them, partly as a way to shift more health care costs to workers, including by penalizing them financially.

The 2008 genetic law prohibits a group health plan — the kind employers have — from asking, let alone requiring, someone to undergo a genetic test. It also prohibits that specifically for “underwriting purposes,” which is where wellness programs come in. “Underwriting purposes” includes basing insurance deductibles, rebates, rewards, or other financial incentives on completing a health risk assessment or health screenings. In addition, any genetic information can be provided to the employer only in a de-identified, aggregated form, rather than in a way that reveals which individual has which genetic profile.

There is a big exception, however: as long as employers make providing genetic information “voluntary,” they can ask employees for it. Under the House bill, none of the protections for health and genetic information provided by GINA or the disabilities law would apply to workplace wellness programs. As a result, employers could demand that employers undergo genetic testing and health screenings.

Too many dark nightmare scenarios can be imagined as genetic testing is required. Jews own the medical and associated industries. Do you trust them with your DNA?