Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Kevin “Hercules” Sorbo to George Clooney

Wikipedia

Sorbo is a Christian, and believes that his religious views have caused Hollywood to limit his career.[28] While he was raised in the Lutheran church, he later in life chose to attend an evangelical nondenominational church.[29] In August 2014, he gave a call-in interview to the Christian-themed Peter Heck Radio Show, during which the 2014 film Noah and its writer-producer-director Darren Aronofsky were briefly discussed. Sorbo made the following comment about Hollywood not being serious about Biblical movies, as evidenced by Aronofsky, a professed atheist,[30] being hired to make the Old Testament story of Noah: “I sort of understand why they don’t want to deal with the New Testament in Hollywood because, you know, it’s, it’s pretty much run by the world of the Jewish population, and, at the same time, at least get someone who has, at least beliefs, that the potential is there, that it could be a real story.”[31]

Sorbo considers himself politically independent,[32] but has expressed interest in the libertarian philosophy of agorism.[33]

Inspirational VIDEO Quote of the Day: You’ll Never Walk Alone (Video)

Dedicated to our British working class friends.

Wikipedia

Gerry and the Pacemakers were an English beat group prominent in the 1960s Merseybeat scene. In common with the Beatles, they came from Liverpool, were managed by Brian Epstein, and were recorded by George Martin.[1]

They are most remembered for being the first act to reach number one in the UK Singles Chart with their first three single releases: “How Do You Do It?”, “I Like It” and “You’ll Never Walk Alone”.[2] This record was not equalled for 20 years,[2] until the mid-1980s success of fellow Liverpool band Frankie Goes to Hollywood. Consequently, they stand as the second most successful pop group originating in Liverpool. Another of their most famous songs, “Ferry Cross the Mersey”, refers to the River Mersey that flows into Liverpool.

Lyrics:

You’ll Never Walk Alone
Gerry and the Pacemakers

When you walk through a storm
Hold your head up high
And don’t be afraid of the dark

At the end of a storm
There’s a golden sky
And the sweet silver song of a lark

Walk on through the wind
Walk on through the rain
Though your dreams be tossed and blown

Walk on, walk on
With hope in your heart
And you’ll never walk alone

You’ll never walk alone

Walk on, walk on
With hope in your heart
And you’ll never walk alone

You’ll never walk alone

Songwriters: Oscar Hammerstein Ii / Richard Rodgers
You’ll Never Walk Alone lyrics © Imagem Music Inc

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About Humor by Silent Film Star Harold Lloyd, Who Also Photographed Nude Women

No net, no camera tricks.

Milquetoast Harold Lloyd was an avid photographer of nude women. He used a 3-D camera. Here are a few of the photos he took.

Betty Page:

Marilyn Monroe:

The odd color outlines are from the 3-D camera.

Dixie Evans:

Tura Satana, showing the 3-D effect:

One more:

A book of Harold’s nudes was published some years ago.

And another one:

Link to the Harold Lloyd Wikipedia page.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by America’s Favorite Redhead, Lucille Ball

Wikipedia

Lucille Désirée Ball (August 6, 1911 – April 26, 1989) was an American actress, comedienne, model, film-studio executive, and producer. She was best known as the star of the self-produced sitcoms I Love Lucy, The Lucy–Desi Comedy Hour, The Lucy Show, Here’s Lucy, and Life with Lucy.[2]

Ball was nominated for 13 Primetime Emmy Awards, winning four times.[8] In 1977, Ball was among the first recipients of the Women in Film Crystal Award.[9] She was the recipient of the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award in 1979,[10] inducted into the Television Hall of Fame in 1984, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Kennedy Center Honors in 1986,[11] and the Governors Award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in 1989.[12]

When Ball registered to vote in 1936, she listed her party affiliation as Communist.[60] (She was registered as a Communist in 1938 as well.)[61] In order to sponsor the Communist Party’s 1936 candidate for the California State Assembly’s 57th District, Ball signed a certificate stating, “I am registered as affiliated with the Communist Party.”[62] The same year, she was appointed to the State Central Committee of the Communist Party of California, according to records of the California Secretary of State. In 1937, Hollywood writer Rena Vale, a self-identified former Communist, attended a Communist Party new members’ class at Ball’s home, according to Vale’s testimony before the United States House of Representatives’ Special House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), on July 22, 1940.[63

Immediately before the filming of episode 68 (“The Girls Go Into Business”) of I Love Lucy, Desi Arnaz, instead of his usual audience warm-up, told the audience about Lucy and her grandfather. Reusing the line he had first given to Hedda Hopper in an interview, he quipped: “The only thing red about Lucy is her hair, and even that is not legitimate.”[68]

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by President Bill Clinton on Immigration

We were naive then. We believed him.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About the Difficulties of Life

Wikipedia

Morgan Scott Peck (May 22, 1936 – September 25, 2005) was an American psychiatrist and best-selling author who wrote the book, The Road Less Traveled, published in 1978.

The Road Less Traveled,[9] published in 1978, is Peck’s best-known work, and the one that made his reputation. It is, in short, a description of the attributes that make for a fulfilled human being, based largely on his experiences as a psychiatrist and a person.

The book consists of four parts. In the first part Peck examines the notion of discipline, which he considers essential for emotional, spiritual, and psychological health, and which he describes as “the means of spiritual evolution”. The elements of discipline that make for such health include the ability to delay gratification, accepting responsibility for oneself and one’s actions, a dedication to truth, and “balancing”. “Balancing” refers to the problem of reconciling multiple, complex, possibly conflicting factors that impact on an important decision—on one’s own behalf or on behalf of another.

In the second part, Peck addresses the nature of love, which he considers the driving force behind spiritual growth. He contrasts his own views on the nature of love against a number of common misconceptions about love, including:

that love is identified with romantic love (he considers it a very destructive myth when it is solely relying on “feeling in love”),
that love is related to dependency,
that true love is linked with the feeling of “falling in love”.

Peck argues that “true” love is rather an action that one undertakes consciously in order to extend one’s ego boundaries by including others or humanity, and is therefore the spiritual nurturing—which can be directed toward oneself, as well as toward one’s beloved.

In the third part Peck deals with religion, and the commonly accepted views and misconceptions concerning religion. He recounts experiences from several patient case histories, and the evolution of the patients’ notion of God, religion, atheism—especially of their own “religiosity” or atheism—as their therapy with Peck progressed.

The fourth and final part concerns “grace”, the powerful force originating outside human consciousness that nurtures spiritual growth in human beings. In order to focus on the topic, he describes the miracles of health, the unconscious, and serendipity—phenomena which Peck says:

nurture human life and spiritual growth,
are incompletely understood by scientific thinking,
are commonplace among humanity,
originate outside the conscious human will.

He concludes that “the miracles described indicate that our growth as human beings is being assisted by a force other than our conscious will” (Peck, 1978/1992,[9] p281).

Random House, where the then little-known psychiatrist first tried to publish his original manuscript, turned him down, saying the final section was “too Christ-y.” Thereafter, Simon & Schuster published the work for $7,500 and printed a modest hardback run of 5,000 copies. The book took off only after Peck hit the lecture circuit and personally sought reviews in key publications. Later reprinted in paperback in 1980, The Road first made best-seller lists in 1984 – six years after its initial publication.[8]

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Film’s Greatest Comedian, Buster Keaton

Wikipedia

Keaton was at one point briefly institutionalized; according to the TCM documentary So Funny it Hurt, Keaton escaped a straitjacket with tricks learned from Harry Houdini. In 1933, he married his nurse, Mae Scriven, during an alcoholic binge about which he afterwards claimed to remember nothing (Keaton himself later called that period an “alcoholic blackout”). Scriven herself would later claim that she didn’t know Keaton’s real first name until after the marriage. The singular event that triggered Scriven filing for divorce in 1935 was her finding Keaton with Leah Clampitt Sewell (libertine wife of millionaire Barton Sewell) on July 4 the same year in a hotel in Santa Barbara.[59] When they divorced in 1936, it was again at great financial cost to Keaton.[60]

On May 29, 1940, Keaton married Eleanor Norris (July 29, 1918 – October 19, 1998), who was 23 years his junior. She has been credited by Jeffrey Vance with saving Keaton’s life by stopping his heavy drinking and helping to salvage his career.[61] The marriage lasted until his death. Between 1947 and 1954, they appeared regularly in the Cirque Medrano in Paris as a double act. She came to know his routines so well that she often participated in them on TV revivals.

Keaton died of lung cancer on February 1, 1966, aged 70, in Woodland Hills, California.[62] Despite being diagnosed with cancer in January 1966, he was never told that he was terminally ill or that he had cancer; Keaton thought that he was recovering from a severe case of bronchitis. Confined to a hospital during his final days, Keaton was restless and paced the room endlessly, desiring to return home. In a British television documentary about his career, his widow Eleanor told producers of Thames Television that Keaton was up out of bed and moving around, and even played cards with friends who came to visit the day before he died.[63]