Inspirational Quote of the Day: One about Tax Slavery

When I was an economics professor, the libertarian faculty would sometimes bring up the name Nozick, as if he were a god.

Excerpt from Wikipedia

Robert Nozick (/ˈnoʊzɪk/; November 16, 1938 – January 23, 2002) was an American philosopher. He held the Joseph Pellegrino University Professorship at Harvard University, and was president of the American Philosophical Association. He is best known for his book Anarchy, State, and Utopia (1974), a libertarian answer to John Rawls’ A Theory of Justice (1971). His other work involved decision theory and epistemology.

Nozick was born in Brooklyn. His mother was born Sophie Cohen, and his father was a Jew from the Russian shtetl who had been born with the name of Cohen and who ran a small business.

For Anarchy, State, and Utopia (1974) Nozick received a National Book Award in category Philosophy and Religion.[2] There, Nozick argues that only a minimal state “limited to the narrow functions of protection against force, theft, fraud, enforcement of contracts, and so on” could be justified without violating people’s rights. For Nozick, a distribution of goods is just if brought about by free exchange among consenting adults from a just starting position, even if large inequalities subsequently emerge from the process. Nozick appealed to the Kantian idea that people should be treated as ends (what he termed ‘separateness of persons’), not merely as a means to some other end.

The Examined Life (1989), pitched to a broader public, explores love, death, faith, reality, and the meaning of life. According to Stephen Metcalf, Nozick expresses serious misgivings about capitalist libertarianism, going so far as to reject much of the foundations of the theory on the grounds that personal freedom can sometimes only be fully actualized via a collectivist politics and that wealth is at times justly redistributed via taxation to protect the freedom of the many from the potential tyranny of an overly selfish and powerful few.[12] Nozick suggests that citizens who are opposed to wealth redistribution which fund programs they object to, should be able to opt out by supporting alternative government approved charities with an added 5% surcharge.[13] However, Jeff Riggenbach has noted that “…in an interview conducted in July 2001, he stated that he had never stopped self-identifying as a libertarian. And Roderick Long reports that in his last book, Invariances, [Nozick] identified voluntary cooperation as the ‘core principle’ of ethics, maintaining that the duty not to interfere with another person’s ‘domain of choice’ is ‘[a]ll that any society should (coercively) demand’; higher levels of ethics, involving positive benevolence, represent instead a ‘personal ideal’ that should be left to ‘a person’s own individual choice and development.’ And that certainly sounds like an attempt to embrace libertarianism all over again. My own view is that Nozick’s thinking about these matters evolved over time and that what he wrote at any given time was an accurate reflection of what he was thinking at that time.”[14]

Inspirational Quote of the Day: Thomas Jefferson on Banks

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by German War Criminal Hans Frank

Excerpt from Wikipedia

Hans Michael Frank (23 May 1900 – 16 October 1946) was a German war criminal, lawyer who worked for the Nazi Party during the 1920s and 1930s, and later became Adolf Hitler’s personal lawyer. After the invasion of Poland, Frank became Nazi Germany’s chief jurist in the occupied Poland “General Government” territory. During his tenure throughout World War II (1939–45), he instituted a reign of terror against the civilian population[1] and became directly involved in the mass murder of Jews. At the Nuremberg trials, he was found guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity and was executed.

Frank’s view of what the judicial process required was that:
[The judge’s] role is to safeguard the concrete order of the racial community, to eliminate dangerous elements, to prosecute all acts harmful to the community, and to arbitrate in disagreements between members of the community. The National Socialist ideology, especially as expressed in the Party programme and in the speeches of our Leader, is the basis for interpreting legal sources.[7]

The Wikipedia entry on Hans Frank is fascinating.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: George Orwell’s Most Famous Quote

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About a “Giant Conspiracy”

Excerpt from Jeffrey Tucker’s Wikipedia

Alleged role in Ron Paul Newsletters[edit]

In an interview with Reason, Timothy Virkkala, former managing editor of the libertarian magazine Liberty, alleged that Tucker played a role in the production of racially charged newsletters written on behalf of Ron Paul. By Virkkala’s account, he heard from Bill Bradford, then the editor of Liberty, that Tucker was an “assistant, [and] probably a writer” who assisted “editor and chief writer” Lew Rockwell in creating the newsletters.[9] Eric Dondero, who served as (election) campaign coordinator and senior aide to Ron Paul in the mid to late 1990s, told the American Spectator in an on-line reader comment that “Lew Rockwell and Jeff Tucker wrote the newsletters.”[23] According to a political blog by Economist, unnamed “numerous veterans” of the libertarian movement said it was an “open secret” throughout the late 1980s and early 1990s that Tucker and Rockwell ghostwrote the newsletters.[24] In response to questions about his role with the newsletters from Reason, Tucker said, “I just really am not going to make a statement, I’m sorry. I’ll take all responsibility for being the editor of Mises.org, OK?”[9]

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by George Orwell

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Frederic Bastiat

Learn more about Frederic Bastiat at Wikipedia.

Claude-Frédéric Bastiat (French: [klod fʁedeʁik bastja]; 29 June 1801[1] – 24 December 1850) was a French economist and author who was a prominent member of the French Liberal School. He developed the economic concept of opportunity cost, and introduced the Parable of the Broken Window. He was also a Freemason, and member of the French National Assembly.[2]

As a strong advocate of classical liberalism and the economics of Adam Smith, his views favouring free trade and opposing protectionism provided a basis for libertarian capitalism and the Austrian School.[3]