United Douglas DC-8 Promo Film – 1959 (Jet Age Nostalgia Video)

There are an amazing number of things you won’t believe about this little jewel of a film. The 1950s were probably peak America.

Great music at around the 6 minute mark as the big jet airliner takes off. I hope someone finds the end of the film and restores it.

Published on Mar 26, 2014

Re-upped with better colour. Same uniform Mom wore…CHECK. “United” titles on the port wing…CHECK. Early “Black Button” nose…CHECK. P&W JT3C-6 turbojets…CHECK. White horisontal stabs…CHECK. Sorry, the end of the film is missing.

People who watch this sort of material understand what has been lost:

Very quaint indeed. Notice the level of class and breeding among the passengers. Nary a flip flop or cargo shorts in sight. And how about all that swell grub? Was air travel really like this once.

Folks! Those were the days. Started myself 2years after this Promo film from 1959 in SAS ( Scandinavien Airlines System), nowadays called Scandinavian. In 1973-76 I was a Station manager and responsible for our DC8-62 operation in Monrovia, Liberia West Africa. At that time we operated from Copenhagen via Zürich and Monrovia to South America( read Rio De Janeiro, Montevideo, Buenos Aires and Santiago De Chile) and back. In my opinion the DC8 was one of the best, if not the best, commercial jet aircrat ever!

he Boeing 707 was an aerial tanker / refueler – the KC-135 – modified as a passenger jet. The DC-8 was built from the ground up as a passenger jet and was the better plane. The 30 degree wing sweep made for a smoother ride than the 707’s 35 degree sweep. A DC-8 was once flown faster than sound, a feat never accomplished by the 707.

In those days, EVERYONE was treated like they were in first class. First Class, was a place where one was treated like Royalty. The food on the carriers in those days was a delight. And why not, the food was prepared by kitchens dedicated to high quality food while flying First Class, baby. Unless you are a millionaire now, the majority of you wont know what being treated special really felt like. 

Before NYC was a ghetto.

United Douglas DC-8 – “Chicago to Los Angeles” – 1963 (Nostalgia Video)

I haven’t posted a nostalgia video in a while, so here’s one for all you folks who fly on airplanes.

It’s truly amazing what we’ve lost in the space of my lifetime.

The former USA, now Amurkistan, may be trash now, but one way or another we’re going to fix it.

Published on Apr 9, 2014

Now re-upped in full length form. Classic ATC promo film, this is a great one from start to finish, with lots of neat UAL DC-8 Series 12 & 21 footage, plus scenes around O’Hare & LAX! Many thanks to the Internet Archive, Fed Flix Collection. Be sure to check my channel for the best in VINTAGE & RARE airliner videos!

NAACP Issues National Travel Advisory for American Airlines

NPR reports that American Airlines has agreed to meet with the NAACP.

I’m sensing money changing hands.

For now at least, American should be the choice for white travelers who desire a Nagger-free experience.

NAACP

(October 24, 2017) – The NAACP, the nation’s original and largest social justice advocacy organization, has released the following statement today announcing a travel advisory warning African Americans about their safety and well being when patronizing American Airlines or traveling on American Airlines flights:

“The NAACP for several months now has been monitoring a pattern of disturbing incidents reported by African-American passengers, specific to American Airlines. In light of these confrontations, we have today taken the action of issuing national advisory alerting travelers—especially African Americans—to exercise caution, in that booking and boarding flights on American Airlines could subject them disrespectful, discriminatory or unsafe conditions. This travel advisory is in effect beginning today, October 24, 2017, until further notice.

The series of recent incidents involve troublesome conduct by American Airlines and they suggest a corporate culture of racial insensitivity and possible racial bias on the part of American Airlines. Among these incidents:

An African-American man was required to relinquish his purchased seats aboard a flight from Washington, D.C. to Raleigh-Durham, merely because he responded to disrespectful and discriminatory comments directed toward him by two unruly white passengers;

Despite having previously booked first-class tickets for herself and a traveling companion, an African-American woman’s seating assignment was switched to the coach section at the ticket counter, while her white companion remained assigned to a first-class seat;

On a flight bound for New York from Miami, the pilot directed that an African-American woman be removed from the flight when she complained to the gate agent about having her seating assignment changed without her consent; and

An African-American woman and her infant child were removed from a flight from Atlanta to New York City when the woman (incidentally a Harvard Law School student) asked that her stroller be retrieved from checked baggage before she would disembark.

The NAACP deplores such alarming behavior on the part of airline personnel, and we are aware of these incidents only because the passengers involved knew their rights, knew to speak up and exercised the courage to do so promptly. Historically, the NAACP has issued travel advisories when conditions on the ground pose a substantial risk of harm to black Americans, and we are concerned today that the examples cited herein may represent only the ‘tip of the iceberg’ when it comes to American Airlines’ documented mistreatment of African-American customers.”

“All travelers must be guaranteed the right to travel without fear of threat, violence or harm,” stated Derrick Johnson, President and CEO of the NAACP. “The growing list of incidents suggesting racial bias reflects an unacceptable corporate culture and involves behavior that cannot be dismissed as normal or random. We expect an audience with the leadership of American Airlines to air these grievances and to spur corrective action. Until these and other concerns are addressed, this national travel advisory will stand,”

If you have recently experienced a concerning travel irregularity on American Airlines on another provider and would like to report it, please do so here.

The NAACP only tells the Dindu side of the story. As we know, blacks always dindu nuffins. According to them. Coming from a race notable for its lack of self control.

This American Airlines story about a dying Negress on an American plane illustrates how there’s two sides to every story.

Delta Airlines Tries to Shut Down Ann Coulter

There’s still a lot of talk in the press and social media about the Ann Coulter “Twitter rant” that started a few days ago and continued through yesterday. Who knows, the war of words may continue today.

Lots of opinions, some supporting Ann, others Delta, have been expressed.

The source piece for this post discusses a company’s optimal strategy in dealing with customer issues. It finds that Delta made a mistake in picking a fight with Ann.

USA Today

Airlines are often targets of angry tweets from passengers, but like most major brands they typically tread carefully with their responses to complaints on social media.

By shutting down a polarizing figure like conservative commentator Ann Coulter, Delta Air Lines’ response became a political statement, whether that was the intention or not. The airline pushed back at Coulter after she berated it Saturday on Twitter over getting her seat changed.

Coulter began tweeting about the episode Saturday in which she said the airline gave away an “extra room seat” she reserved before a flight from New York to Florida departed. Coulter had booked an aisle seat, but got a window seat.

“Any back and forth with a customer, particularly a political commentator like this, is going to be viewed through a political lens.” said Tanya Meck, the executive vice president of Global Strategies Group, which specializes in strategic communications.

The company’s original tweet has been liked and shared more than 150,000 times, but people are responding in defense of both Coulter and the airline.

Delta offered Coulter a refund, but also hit back at her criticisms on Twitter saying, “Your insults about our other customers and employees are unacceptable and unnecessary.“

The airline later put out a statement explaining the confusion that lead to Coulter being moved from her reserved seat, and restating their disappointment with Coulter’s comments:

“We are sorry that the customer did not receive the seat she reserved and paid for. More importantly, we are disappointed that the customer has chosen to publicly attack our employees and other customers by posting derogatory and slanderous comments and photos in social media. Her actions are unnecessary and unacceptable.

Just two days earlier, rapper ScHoolboy Q accused United Airlines of putting his dog on the wrong flight, and United’s response was much more conventional:

When customers tweet their complaints at most companies, chances are they will get an apology and a request for more information — unless of course they’re tweeting at Wendy’s, in which case they’ll get roasted.

Chains like Wendy’s and Denny’s have mastered building relationships and responding to customers, even complaints, in a lighthearted way. Smirnoff and Reebok have both taken the opportunity to poke fun at the Trump administration, much to the delight of social media.

Delta’s clapback, however, was met with a mixed response.

“Our response is not that much different than a few days before on another attack,” Delta spokesman Anthony Black said in an email, referencing Delta’s response to comments made by Qatar CEO Akbar Al Baker’s.

Such a strong condemnation could be viewed as “attacking her and her views simultaneously,” according to Daniel Korschun, an associate professor of marketing at Drexel University in Philadelphia. These views are likely shared by many of their customers.

“I think they may have overreacted,” he said. “Generally it is in the company’s best interest to treat all customers the same.”

Korschun said he believes companies can and should be transparent about their political leanings, and that doing so can be great marketing technique. His research shows that customers expect companies that prioritize their core values to take a stand on important issues.

The jury is still out on what Delta’s response will mean for its image. Meck says that while unpopular stances may incite social media backlash, it doesn’t often affect a company’s bottom line.

“Americans expect companies to take a stance or respond to an issue or current event, even if the issue is perceived as political — as long as the company explains it motivation,” Meck said. “In these respects, Delta passed with flying colors.”

I have no doubt that Delta pushed Ann around (or tried to anyway) because she’s white, blonde, and an effective spokesperson for conservative politics.

Take a look at this Delta Tweet and understand that the company is a cesspool of “progressive” thinking:

I’ve said from the beginning that I thought Delta’s dirty tricks were coming out of the faggot agenda. I’ve seen nothing to change my mind.

Ann, always colorful in her word choice really gave me a laugh when she described the female passenger given her seat with extra leg room as being dachshund-legged.

Haha. That woman doesn’t look white to me, so there may be some racial animosity at play, as well as political correctness. Ann claims she was an immigrant.

In any case, this little guy wouldn’t need the extra leg room:

Politics? Delta Boots Ann Coulter from Reserved Seat

It’s easy to believe that a far-left employee at Delta Airlines decided to punish leggy conservative Ann Coulter for her conservative political and social views. In fact, I’ll bet the scalawag who did the dirty deed is a sodomite male. This is exactly the kind of dirty trick those freaks like to play.

New York Post

Conservative columnist Ann Coulter flew into a fit of fury Saturday after Delta Airlines booted her from her reserved “Comfort+’’ seat — which comes with 3 additional inches of legroom — and gave it to another passenger.

In a two-hour tweeting tantrum,she quoted her exchange with a flight attendant: “Why are you taking me out of the extra room seat I specifically booked?’’ she asked.

Their answer, she said, was “I don’t know.’’

The 6-foot-tall Coulter, who is 55, tweeted a picture of the woman who got her aisle seat on the flight from LaGuardia to Florida, noting, “Delta didn’t give my extra room seat to an air marshal or tall person.’’

A Delta spokesman said it appeared Coulter was in the same extra-room row, just in a different seat. But he promised to look into it.

One Twitter user, clearly not a fan of the columnist, wrote. “Ann Coulter is having a bad day which makes my day better. Thanks Delta.”

Entitled Muzzie Making a Stink About Request by Airport Security to Remove Hijab

AGHNIA ADZKIA. IT’S ALL ABOUT HER “RIGHTS.”

Muh discrimination.

A Muslim student is asked by the nice airport security lady to remove her head scarf.

Her response? DISCRIMINATION!

metro.co.uk

A woman was told by airport security that she was not allowed to board when she tried to get on her plane to London – because she was wearing a hijab.

The student refused to remove her headscarf after watching nuns walk through without being asked to remove their habits.

Aghnia Adzkia claims she was discriminated against by Italian airport staff.

The Indonesian citizen filmed her experience at Ciampino Airport in the Italian capital of Rome.

The security official can be heard saying: ‘You are not safe.

‘You could hide something in your hair. If you don’t take it off, we do not know if there’s something inside, okay? You are not safe for us.’

She had refused to take off her hijab on principle claiming she was being unfairly targeted.

The Goldsmith university student claims a male security officer then dragged her out of the security area in ‘indecent way’ grabbing her bag and shouting at her to be quiet.

THE NICE ITALIAN SECURITY LADY PUT SAFETY FIRST.

Speaking to MailOnline, Ms Adzkia said: ‘I completely understand about what is going in the world lately. I stand against terrorism and that’s not Islam.

Ms Adzkia can be seen repeatedly demanding to see the law stating that the hijab must be removed at an airport security check.

‘Yet, what I’ve experienced in Rome was shocking, the way they treated me indecently has shown discrimination. I understand if it is for security reason, but why did they not give me a second to read the law?’

Ms Adzkia alerted Facebook friends to the incident in a post that went viral, however it has since been taken down.

She wrote: ‘I wanted to prove to them that I have nothing to hide and that I am not a terrorist.

‘In the meantime, I saw two nuns wearing headscarves, but they weren’t asked to take them off.

‘Is this what you call fair treatment and respect? Where are my human rights?’

Another hijab-wearing woman, Aisyah Allamanda, said Ms Adzkia should have agreed to remove her headscarf.

The official at the Indonesian Embassy said: ‘The numerous times I’ve flown out of Rome’s airport, I also experienced the same kind of security check as I also happen to wear a hijab.

‘The same applies to others who wear the hijab at Rome KBRI, female Muslims believe that they can’t take off their headscarves in public so they are provided a private room for a female officer to carry out the check.

‘If we refuse, I can understand if the security officer acts aggressively towards us.’

DANGEROUS TERRORISTS. TAKE OFF THOSE NUN’S HABITS.

Delta Air Pays Bumped Family $11,000

For a lot of folks, $11,000 is about six months income. How do I become a professional bumpee? Hell, I could make $11,000 a weekend? That’s more than $500,000 a year! Let’s go for it!

Forbes

Over the past week, Delta Air Lines has encountered epic travel delays after unprecedented storms forced the cancellation of thousands of flights.

This weekend, my family and I profited from Delta’s travel woes — big time. We made $11k. Here’s how we did it and why I’m not such a snob about getting bumped any more.

I travel a lot for my career, and when I’m headed somewhere, I want to get there. As a travel editor, I’ve run stories about people who make a profession out of getting bumped by the airlines. And yet, I’ve always quietly scoffed at travelers who would give up a seat on a flight in exchange for a voucher. Not my thing.

On Friday morning, I was flying from New York City to Florida with my husband and daughter. The bad weather had passed, so I thought we had escaped the wrath.

After hours of delays, Delta Airlines started offering money for volunteers to give up their tickets on our overbooked flight, which had 60 (sixty!) standby passengers hoping to get a seat. I didn’t flinch. My husband and daughter and I were headed to Fort Lauderdale to see our relatives, and — as far as I was concerned — nothing would hold us back.

When the compensation for volunteers got to $900 a ticket in gift cards (American Express, Target, Macy’s and so on), my husband convinced me to consider the offer. I thought it was too low to delay our vacation, but our plans were flexible, so I said I was open to the idea. My husband approached the gate agent and offered to give up our seats for $1,500 apiece. She countered: $1,350 each.

Other frustrated passengers were yelling at the staff and crying over vexed travel plans. Somehow, when an airline is offering you and your family $4,050, missing a flight doesn’t seem so bad. We could have also scored a free hotel room near the airport and complimentary dinner, but we live about 20 minutes from LaGuardia, so we volunteered to give up our seats and headed home with a big chunk of change in American Express gift cards and confirmed seats for a Saturday flight.

When I went to check in online on Saturday and saw that the flight was delayed by more than an hour and that Delta was already asking for volunteers to give up their seats, I turned to my husband and said, “Cha-ching!”

Indeed, when we got to the airport, the airline started offering money to volunteers…$300…$600…$900…$1,000…$1,300. Bingo! We took the offer. The airline ended up giving us two gift cards at $1,300 each and (surprise!) a third at $1,350. Delta also threw in lunch ($15 each) and round-trip taxi fare (worth about $50). That’s more than $4,000, if you factor in everything. The airline assured us that we would get confirmed seats on Sunday.

After our flight departed, we waited. And waited. And waited. But the airline was still struggling to figure out the rebooking and get us three confirmed seats the next day. We found out that standby passengers were being told that Delta flights to Florida were fully booked (in fact, overbooked) until Tuesday. We were drained, and suddenly our long-weekend trip was looking far less appealing.

So when we suggested to the gate agent that we might be open to volunteering our seats again by cancelling the trip altogether, the offer was met with smiles and another $1,000 per person in advance compensation. Delta sweetened the deal by refunding the cost of the three plane tickets. We accepted Delta’s offer and went home, sad to miss our trip, but not so sad about the lucrative results.