Zimbabwe’s Mugabe to Face Impeachment

As of this writing Robert Mugabe has shown no inclination to leave office.

It looks like he will have to be pushed out.

Will Zimbabwe peacefully transition to a different leader. You’ll have to take it day by day to see.

Sky News

Zimbabwe’s ousted vice president has called on Robert Mugabe to quit immediately – paving the way for him to take over.

Emmerson Mnangagwa – known as “the crocodile” – said in a statement on Tuesday that he is not in Zimbabwe and will not return until he is “satisfied of my personal security”.

He added that Mr Mugabe must “heed the call of the people to resign” or face “humiliation”.

Impeachment proceedings to remove the 93-year-old from power are expected to begin later – with the ruling Zanu-PF party backing Mr Mnangagwa to replace him.

Zimbabwe’s leader stunned his country on Sunday when he failed to announce that he was stepping down.

An ultimatum from Zanu-PF to resign by midday on Monday or face impeachment also came and went with no word from Mr Mugabe.

The party will now press ahead with impeachment by tabling a motion, and it believes it can all be done and dusted in a couple of days – contrary to the view of some experts.

“We want to get rid of this animal called Mugabe. We have the numbers, the opposition is also going to support us,” said Zanu-PF MP Vongai Mupereri.

“We are going to impeach – the man has to go,” MP MacKenzie Ncube told the AFP news agency.

Zimbabwe’s military chief said on Monday evening that a road map to hand over power had been agreed with Mr Mugabe.

Constantino Chiwenga said Mr Mnangagwa, whose firing led to the unrest in the country, would return to Zimbabwe “shortly” to meet the President.

Rubbing the noses of his opponents and most of his citizens, Mr Mugabe is also set to host a cabinet meeting on Tuesday at his official residence – although Zanu-PF has told ministers not to attend.

The 93-year-old has ruled Zimbabwe with an iron fist since 1980 and the end of British colonialism, but events last week have brought him to the brink.

The vice president’s sacking put Mugabe’s unpopular wife, Grace, in prime position to succeed him.

The army promptly seized power and put the President under house arrest – but insisted it had not staged a coup.

Despite the impeachment machinery getting moving on Tuesday, lawyers have told Sky News it could take months to prise him from power.

Tarisai Mutangi, a constitutional lawyer, said: “He knows the law is on his side, that the constitution is on his side and that the kingpins of this process want to do it constitutionally, and that means it’s going to take quite some time.”

Under the Zimbabwean constitution, the president can be impeached for four things:

:: Serious misconduct
:: Failure to obey, uphold or defend this constitution
:: Willful violation of this Constitution
:: Inability to perform the functions of the office because of physical or mental incapacity

Here’s some grandfatherly advice from Papa Mugabe:

Zimbabwe: Mugabe to Negotiate Exit Deal?

Zimbabwe’s whites will be safer if there’s no orgy of bloodletting as has happened elsewhere in Africa.

President Mugabe had been calling for government theft of the land owned by white farmers, which undoubtedly would have ended up in the hands of his cronies. How a replacement government will deal with whites is something I don’t think anyone knows at this point.

If hard white genocide breaks out, we’re going to have to petition President Trump to take action to fly every single white person out of the country to safety in America.

The following comes from a Zimbabwean news source.

ewn.co.za

JOHANNESBURG – As South Africa’s special envoys to Zimbabwe begin talks on the crisis in the neighbouring country on Thursday morning, there are reports that President Robert Mugabe has been given an opportunity to negotiate an exit deal, which includes state protection for him and his family.

This has not been independently verified.

The SABC is reporting that Zimbabwe is likely to have a transitional government, which means sacked vice president Emmerson Mnangagwa could act as president for at least three months.

Defence Minister Nosiviwe Maphisa-Nqakula and her state security counterpart Bongani Bongo arrived in Harare on Wednesday night.

They were deployed after the army announced a purge of what it calls criminals around President Mugabe.

Mugabe is said to be safe at home, where the military is holding him and his family.

International relations spokesperson Clayson Monyela says that all involved, including Mugabe, will be invited to the discussions aimed at ending the crisis.

“I can confirm that the special envoys appointed by president Zuma have arrived in Zimbabwe, they were welcomed well. They have just been briefed at the VIP lounge.”

Meanwhile, in the city, traffic appears to be flowing as normal on the roads in Harare on Thursday morning.

Some private schools that had shut or only catered for a few pupils on Wednesday have now reopened.

The head of the public service commission, Mariyawanda Nzuwah told Thursday’s Herald newspaper that civil servants should report for work as usual.

The big question now is: will two envoys, sent by President Zuma to meet with Mugabe and the Zimbabwe Defence Forces, have access to the main players as this situation unfolds?

Meanwhile, the head of the Zanu-PF youth league has apologised to the head of the army for criticising him in a statement earlier this week.

Kudzai Chipanga was a close ally of First Lady Grace Mugabe and said earlier this week that he and other youths were willing to die for President Mugabe. This was a humiliation for Chipanga, who was arrested on Wednesday.

He appeared on state television on Wednesday night to read out a statement in which he apologised to the head of the defence forces, Constantine Chiwenga.

He said he had erred and was ill-advised and begged the commander to accept his apologies. He also claimed that he hadn’t been forced to make the apology.

Chipanga on Tuesday criticised the army for threatening to step in.

The state broadcaster has also changed its tune: it’s now giving positive coverage to war veteran leaders who have called for the removal of Mugabe as leader of Zanu-PF.

The comments at the source site suggest that Mugabe should be placed on trial for genociding some African tribe whose name was unfamiliar to me. There’s a lot that goes on in Zimbabwe that stays in Zimbabwe.

WHITE WOMEN IN ZIMBABWE. STAY SAFE, PEOPLE.

That photo of the women came from this very weird article pandering to blacks.

Confusion About Zimbabwe as Army Takes Control of Harare But Denies Coup

FILE PHOTO OF COURAGEOUS DOG GUARDING WHITE ZIMBABWE FAMILY.

Our concern is for the safety of our white brothers and sisters in Zimbabwe. Otherwise, let the African natives have at each other.

Let’s hope that so-called refugees are not created by the present situation. They have a way of ending up in Europe and America.

BBC

The military has taken control in Zimbabwe but said President Robert Mugabe, in power since 1980, was safe.
After seizing state TV, an army spokesman announced it was targeting people close to Mr Mugabe who had caused “social and economic suffering”.

The move came after Mr Mugabe sacked his deputy, Emmerson Mnangagwa, in favour of his wife, Grace.

Heavy gun and artillery fire could be heard in northern parts of the capital Harare early on Wednesday.

A statement read out by a general on air denied it was a coup. There was no immediate word from the president himself.

Messages appeared on a Twitter account purportedly run by the ruling Zanu-PF party saying he had been detained. But there has been no confirmation by the army.
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Mr Mugabe, 93, has dominated the impoverished country’s political scene since independence from the UK.

South African President Jacob Zuma said he hoped events in Zimbabwe would not lead to “unconstitutional changes of government”.

The UK Foreign Office advised Britons “currently in Harare to remain safely at home or in their accommodation until the situation becomes clearer”, while the US embassy in Harare advised US citizens in Zimbabwe to “shelter in place” until further notice.

China, Zimbabwe’s biggest trading partner, says it is closely watching the situation and hopes that the relevant parties can properly handle their internal affairs.

How did the military justify its move?

Troops in armoured vehicles have been out in the streets of the capital Harare since Tuesday.

After soldiers overran the headquarters of the ZBC broadcaster, Maj Gen Sibusiso Moyo went on air to say the military wished to “assure the nation that his Excellency the president… and his family are safe and sound and their security is guaranteed”.

“We are only targeting criminals around him who are committing crimes… that are causing social and economic suffering in the country,” he said.

“As soon as we have accomplished our mission, we expect that the situation will return to normalcy.”

Other key points of the statement include:

Citizens should remain calm and limit unnecessary movement

The military assures the Zimbabwean judiciary that its independence is guaranteed

Security services should “co-operate for the good of our country” and any provocation would “be met with an appropriate response”

All leave for the defence forces is cancelled and personnel should return to barracks immediately

It is not clear who is leading the military action.

Army chief Gen Constantino Chiwenga, who visited China last week, said on Monday the army was prepared to act to end purges within Zanu-PF.

The Guardian Live Updates Page

The Independent’s Live Updates Page

Young American Woman Facing 20 Years in African Prison for Calling Mugabe a “sick man”

MARTHA O’DONOVAN, LEFT, AND ZIMBABWE PRESIDENT ROBERT MUGABE.

She’s probably a liberal, but I still wouldn’t want to see Martha O’Donovan spend the next 20 years in an African jail for violating African mores.

If Martha thinks the Africa is capable of understanding and appreciating the idea of free speech, she’s going to have an unpleasant awakening.

Trump likes to make deals. Let’s see what he can do to #FreeMartha.

Fox News

An American woman charged with subversion in Zimbabwe for allegedly insulting the country’s president will remain in police custody this weekend after making her first court appearance Saturday.

Martha O’Donovan, 25, a graduate of New York University, has been accused of calling President Robert Mugabe, 93, a “sick man” in a Twitter post that included a photo illustration of Mugabe with a catheter. O’Donovan denied the allegations, calling them “baseless and malicious.”

O’Donovan’s lawyer, Rose Hanzi, told the court that a subversion charge was illegal because police did not inform the woman of it when she was taken from her home in the capital, Harare, on Friday morning.

The court disagreed and ruled that O’Donovan will remain in custody over the weekend. Hanzi said on Monday they will approach the High Court for bail.

O’Donovan made no statement in court and showed no emotion as the request was dismissed. She waved to a small crowd of supporters as she was escorted into a prison truck.

The American had been working with a local social media outlet Magamba TV, which described itself as producing “satirical comedy sensations.” She called herself a manager for Magamba TV and a “media activist.”

Earlier this year, she presented a talk at a re:publica digital culture conference on “How Zimbabweans Rebel Online.”

O’Donovan’s arrest was the first since Mugabe appointed a cybersecurity minister last month. Zimbabwe was shaken last year by the biggest anti-government protests in a decade. Frustration is growing in the once prosperous southern African nation as the economy collapses and the president, in power for more than 35 years, is already running for next year’s elections.

MUGABE, AGE 93, WITH WIFE GRACE.

Mugabe’s wife Grace was rumored to take over the presidency after the president, who has been rumored to be in declining health, resigns or dies. The first lady was not well-liked among the country’s citizens due to her lavish spending and fear of being criticized, The Guardian reported.

The group representing O’Donovan, Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights says it has represented nearly 200 people charged for allegedly insulting Mugabe, the world’s oldest head of state, in recent years.

“This arrest marks the start of a sinister new chapter in the Zimbabwean government’s clampdown on freedom of speech, and the new battleground is social media,” said Amnesty International’s deputy regional director, Muleya Mwananyanda. The statement said Zimbabwe authorities tracked tweets to O’Donovan’s IP address.

Heavy offers more on Martha in its 5 Fast Facts format.

Heavy claims that Martha is also the manager of a local bar and that someone has been Tweeting from the account that she is accused of Tweeting from. If so, the authorities have the wrong person.

But maybe this is about blackmailing America. The only problem for the Africans is that Obama isn’t president anymore.

‘Alt-right’ leader Richard Spencer questions whether women should have right to vote

Newsweek’s headline on this story claims that Richard Spencer said that women should not be allowed to vote.

That’s not what he said.

What he did say should leave us with some concern that Spencer is attempting to damage the alt-right with his provocative language.

The title of this post is directly from Dallas News, which offers a more balanced article on women and the alt-right. In the modern world (forget about Hitler’s Germany), populist and nationalist movements need the support of the fairer sex.

Some of you may remember that Spencer was married to a Russian woman.This post included several pictures of her, along with the question: Is Spencer’s (estranged) wife mixed race.

NINA KOUPRIANOVA.

Dallas News

Almost a year ago, Dallas native Richard Spencer told a crowd at Texas A&M University that the United States “belongs to white people.”

He might have meant only to white men.

In an interview with Newsweek, Spencer — the self-appointed leader of the “alt-right,” a loose movement that embraces white supremacist views and Nazi symbols — said he’s not sure whether women should vote in U.S. elections.

“I don’t necessarily think that that’s a great thing,” Spencer told the magazine, which quoted him in an article published Saturday.

He uttered the line in the context of a conversation about his admiration for 18th-century rules that limited U.S. naturalization to white people of “good moral character.” The reporter pressed him on his views about women and democracy.

“I’m not terribly excited about voting in general,” Spencer told Newsweek, declining to explain how he thinks Americans should pick their leaders.

Though the focus on Spencer has been on his Hitler-style propaganda and his racist speeches, his comments to Newsweek mirror previous statements showing hostility toward women.

In September 2016, he criticized Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton — a former secretary of state — by making a sweeping and accusatory statement about how women behave.

“Women should never be allowed to make foreign policy,” he tweeted. “It’s not that they’re ‘weak.’ To the contrary, their vindictiveness knows no bounds.”

In May, when his gym membership near Washington, D.C. was terminated after a female college professor confronted him, Spencer posted a 20-minute video to defend himself. He tried to discredit the woman by attacking her appearance and mocking the way she talked.

“This truly ugly creature came up to me, this triangular-bodied creature,” he said, describing the sound of her voice as “autistic screeching.”

Though the “alt-right” movement can be inhospitable to female autonomy and intellect, some women find it attractive. The general position on the sexes is that they are not equal but have complementary roles — politics is the realm of men and family is that of women, writes a journalist who talked to female champions of the movement for an article in Harper’s Magazine.

A Utah woman named Ayla Stewart told the magazine that she had considered herself a feminist until she became a single parent, when she says she felt pressure to get a job and not worry about needing a man. She told the reporter she felt “shunned and ostracized” for her desire to raise her children in a two-parent home.

Some women are so committed to the movement that they’ve become its recruiters. One of the most prominent is Oregon native Lana Lokteff, founder of Red Ice, a media company that has partnered with Spencer to propel his cause.

Earlier this year, Lokteff advocated for female “alt-right” activism at the same Swedish conference hosting a male blogger who once wrote a piece called “The Case Against Female Self-esteem,” according to Harper’s Magazine.

“When women get involved, a movement becomes a serious threat,” Lokteff told the attendees.

I believe Ayla Stewart was the lovely Wife with a Purpose on Twitter until they banned her. I vaguely recall she objected to schools pushing transgenders on kids or something similar, which led to her ban. I think she may be back on Twitter as Pumpkin Spice. These Tweets give a perspective on women in the alt-right.

Moment of Unity in a Disintegrating World

America’s “moment of unity” caused by the Las Vegas Massacre lasted 20 minutes. Do I have that about right?

CNN, celebretards, libtards, politicians on the left, NFL players and God knows who else began blaming Trump, Deplorables, conservatives, the NRA, and white people in general for the massacre almost immediately. Likewise, most on the right began blaming leftards for the mass killing of conservative country music fans.

Pat Buchanan ponders the question of what will hold America together when the divisions, hatreds, and envy run so deep.

Secession is in America’s future. White people with a traditional frame of mind must begin to prepare to create a future white homeland. Constitutional conventions working out how to prevent the many disasters that the current Constitution has allowed must be formed and draft Constitutions be written. Then there’s the matter of planning a military strategy to fight, if it comes to that.

Pat Buchanan

By Patrick J. Buchanan

“An act of pure evil,” said President Trump of the atrocity in Las Vegas, invoking our ancient faith: “Scripture teaches us the Lord is close to the brokenhearted and saves those who are crushed in spirit.”

“Our unity cannot be shattered by evil. Our bonds cannot be broken by violence,” Trump went on in his most presidential moment, “and though we feel such great anger at the senseless murder of our fellow citizens, it is love that defines us today and always will. Forever.”

Uplifting words. But are they true?

Or will this massacre be like the Sandy Hook Elementary School slaughter of 20 children in Newtown, Connecticut, or Charleston massacre of black churchgoers by Dylan Roof — uniting us briefly in “sadness, shock and grief” only to divide us again and, more deeply, in our endless war over guns.

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Revealed: Obama’s Secret Farewell Letter to Trump

President Trump has called the Obama farewell letter written to him as “beautiful.”

That it is.

There is some hypocrisy to be found in the letter, in particular regarding the part about democracy. However, it’s nice to see a guy like Obama set aside politics in order to offer friendly advice to the new kid on the block.

Unfortunately, the contents of the private letter were leaked, ostensibly by someone at Trump’s end.

Bloomberg

Washington (AP) — Before he left office in January, President Barack Obama offered his successor accolades and advice in a private letter that underscored some of his concerns as he passed the baton.

In the letter, published Sunday by CNN, Obama praised President Donald Trump, saying: “Congratulations on a remarkable run. Millions have placed their hopes in you, and all of us, regardless of party, should hope for expanded prosperity and security during your tenure.”

Obama went on to urge Trump to “build more ladders of success for every child and family,” to “sustain the international order” and to protect “democratic institutions and traditions.”

Obama wrote: “We are just temporary occupants of this office. That makes us guardians of those democratic institutions and traditions — like rule of law, separation of powers, equal protection and civil liberties — that our forebears fought and bled for.”

It is customary for presidents to leave notes for their successors. But typically these missives do not come to light so quickly. The handoff letters from President George W. Bush in 2009 and President Bill Clinton in 2001 were revealed earlier this year. CNN reports it received the Obama letter from “someone Trump showed it to.”

After taking office, Trump praised the note from Obama, calling it a “beautiful letter” in an interview with ABC. Trump added that he called Obama to thank him for the note.

The White House declined to comment, as did a spokesman for Obama.

In the letter, Obama offered some advice: urging Trump to provide opportunities for those “willing to work hard,” arguing that American “leadership in this world really is indispensable” and asking him to leave “instruments of our democracy at least as strong as we found them.”

Obama also wrote that Trump should “take time, in the rush of events and responsibilities, for friends and family. They’ll get you through the inevitable rough patches.” He concluded by wishing the “very best as you embark on this great adventure.”

Former top Obama aide David Axelrod seized on the letter on Twitter, writing: “What wise and eloquent advice from one president to another. Sad how thoroughly @POTUS has disregarded it!”

Former Republican Sen. Rick Santorum criticized the letter’s opening words, calling it “politically correct” on CNN, though he went on to say the rest was “very gracious and well written.”

Click on the continue reading buttom to read the letter as published at CNN.

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