Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Stephen King About Talent

Stephen King’s politics are far left. Check out his Wikipedia entry for other information about his life and work.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Star Trek’s Gene Roddenberry

Feeling inspired, goyim?

Excerpt from Wikipedia

As a freelance writer, Roddenberry wrote scripts for Highway Patrol, Have Gun–Will Travel, and other series, before creating and producing his own television series The Lieutenant. In 1964, Roddenberry created Star Trek, which premiered in 1966 and ran for three seasons before being canceled. He then worked on other projects, including a string of failed television pilots. The syndication of Star Trek led to its growing popularity; this, in turn, resulted in the Star Trek feature films, on which Roddenberry continued to produce and consult. In 1987, the sequel series Star Trek: The Next Generation began airing on television in first-run syndication; Roddenberry was heavily involved in the initial development of the series, but took a less active role after the first season due to ill health. He continued to consult on the series until his death in 1991.

Vulcan saves human:

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Sci-Fi Writer and Anti-White Racist Ursula K. Le Guin

When I go seeking inspirational quotes, I’m sometimes led to interesting places. Not all them really inspirational. That quote above offers some practical advice about reality. Then I went about learning more about the author. A shock set in.

I believe Ursula K.Le Guin is a crypto-Jew. For a harsh critique of her hatred of the white race, click here to visit Heretical.

Her Wikipedia entry also confirms her anti-white bias. Here’s an excerpt that covers the basics:

Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (US /ˈɜːrsələ ˈkroʊbər ləˈɡwɪn/;[1] born October 21, 1929) is an American author of novels, children’s books, and short stories, mainly in the genres of fantasy and science fiction. She has also written poetry and essays. First published in the 1960s, her work has often depicted futuristic or imaginary alternative worlds in politics, the natural environment, gender, religion, sexuality and ethnography. In 2016, The New York Times described her as “America’s greatest living science fiction writer”,[2] although she herself has said she would prefer to be known as an “American novelist”.[3]

She influenced such Booker Prize winners and other writers as Salman Rushdie and David Mitchell – and notable science fiction and fantasy writers including Neil Gaiman and Iain Banks.[4] She has won the Hugo Award, Nebula Award, Locus Award, and World Fantasy Award, each more than once.[4][5] In 2014, she was awarded the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.[6] In 2003 she was made a Grandmaster of Science Fiction, one of only a handful of woman writers to take the top honour in a genre that has come to be dominated by male writers.[7] Le Guin has resided in Portland, Oregon, since 1959.[8]

Le Guin became interested in literature quite early. At age 11 she submitted her first story to the magazine Astounding Science Fiction. It was rejected.[17] She continued writing but did not attempt to publish for ten years.

From 1951 to 1961 she wrote five novels, which publishers rejected because they seemed inaccessible.[12] She also wrote poetry during this time, including Wild Angels (1975).[12]

Her earliest writings, some of which she adapted in Orsinian Tales and Malafrena, were non-fantastic stories of imaginary countries. Searching for a way to express her interests, she returned to her early interest in science fiction; in the early 1960s her work began to be published regularly.

If Le Guin is not Jewish, it would be interesting to have David Duke interview her on why her writing is so anti-white.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Sci-Fi Writer Poul Anderson

Learn more about Poul Anderson at Wikipedia.

Poul William Anderson (November 25, 1926 – July 31, 2001)[2] was an American science fiction author who began his career during the Golden Age of the genre and continued to write and remain popular into the 21st century. Anderson also authored several works of fantasy, historical novels, and a prodigious number of short stories. He received numerous awards for his writing, including seven Hugo Awards and three Nebula Awards.

n many stories, Anderson commented on society and politics. Whatever other vicissitudes his views went through, he firmly retained his belief in the direct and inextricable connection between human liberty and expansion into space, for which reason he strongly cried out against any idea of space exploration being “a waste of money” or “unnecessary luxury”.

The connection between space flight and freedom is clearly (as is stated explicitly in some of the stories) an extension of the nineteenth-century American concept of the Frontier, where malcontents can advance further and claim some new land, and pioneers either bring life to barren asteroids (as in Tales of the Flying Mountains) or settle on Earth-like planets teeming with life, but not intelligent forms (such as New Europe in Star Fox).

Anderson set much of his work in the past, often with the addition of magic, or in alternate or future worlds that resemble past eras. A specialty was his ancestral Scandinavia, as in his novel versions of the legends of Hrólf Kraki (Hrolf Kraki’s Saga) and Haddingus (The War of the Gods). Frequently he presented such worlds as superior to the dull, over-civilized present.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About Democracy by Isaac Asimov

Learn more about Jewish atheist Isaac Asimov at Wikipedia.

Isaac Asimov (/ˈaɪzək ˈæzɪmɒv/;[2] born Isaak Ozimov; c. January 2, 1920[1] – April 6, 1992) was an American writer and professor of biochemistry at Boston University. He was known for his works of science fiction and popular science. Asimov was a prolific writer, and wrote or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards.[3] His books have been published in 9 of the 10 major categories of the Dewey Decimal Classification.[4]
Asimov wrote hard science fiction and, along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, he was considered one of the “Big Three” science fiction writers during his lifetime.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About A Police Dog

A quote dedicated to all of our K9 friends, past, present, and future.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by British Historian Arnold J. Toynbee

Learn more about the most prominent historian of the 20th century at Wikipedia.

Meeting with Adolf Hitler[edit]
While on a visit in Berlin in 1936 to address the Nazi Law Society, Toynbee was invited to have a private interview with Adolf Hitler, at Hitler’s request.[20] Hitler emphasized his limited expansionist aim of building a greater German nation, and his desire for British understanding and cooperation. Toynbee believed that Hitler was sincere and endorsed Hitler’s message in a confidential memorandum for the British prime minister and foreign secretary.[21]

Russia[edit]
Toynbee was troubled by the Russian Revolution, for he saw Russia as a non-Western society and the revolution as a threat to Western society.[22] However, in 1952 he argued that the Soviet Union had been a victim of Western aggression. He portrayed the Cold War as a religious competition that pitted a Marxist materialist heresy against the West’s spiritual Christian heritage—a heritage that had already been foolishly rejected by a secularized West. A heated debate ensued; an editorial in the London Times promptly attacked Toynbee for treating communism as a “spiritual force.”[23]