Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Computer Genius Donald Knuth

When I go looking for quotes, I’m always hoping to find gold. Donald Knuth is gold. I’m not sure about the quote, but Knuth has done more for the computer world than Gates, Jobs, et. al. put together.

Wikipedia

Donald Ervin Knuth (/kəˈnuːθ/[4] kə-NOOTH; born January 10, 1938) is an American computer scientist, mathematician, and professor emeritus at Stanford University.

He is the author of the multi-volume work The Art of Computer Programming. He contributed to the development of the rigorous analysis of the computational complexity of algorithms and systematized formal mathematical techniques for it. In the process he also popularized the asymptotic notation. In addition to fundamental contributions in several branches of theoretical computer science, Knuth is the creator of the TeX computer typesetting system, the related METAFONT font definition language and rendering system, and the Computer Modern family of typefaces.

As a writer and scholar, Knuth created the WEB and CWEB computer programming systems designed to encourage and facilitate literate programming, and designed the MIX/MMIX instruction set architectures. Knuth strongly opposes granting software patents, having expressed his opinion to the United States Patent and Trademark Office and European Patent Organisation.

Knuth used to pay a finder’s fee of $2.56 for any typographical errors or mistakes discovered in his books, because “256 pennies is one hexadecimal dollar”, and $0.32 for “valuable suggestions”. According to an article in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Technology Review, these Knuth reward checks are “among computerdom’s most prized trophies”. Knuth had to stop sending real checks in 2008 due to bank fraud, and instead now gives each error finder a “certificate of deposit” from a publicly listed balance in his fictitious “Bank of San Serriffe”.[31]

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One from Steve Bannon

Snopes rates this quote as unproven but similar to some things that Bannon has said.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: Ron Paul on the Jews

PJ Media, cuckservative to liberal news site, labeled Ron Paul the fifth worst antisemite in America.

You might call that PJ Media piece damage control. We wouldn’t want the goyim to hear the truth, so we’ll just scream “Antisemitism!.”

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by an English Economist

I published a quote from his wife yesterday. Even though Kenneth Boulding was a genius, he admitted that he did not understand Keynes General Theory, the basis for Keynesian economics. I never understood it either.

Wikipedia

Kenneth Ewart Boulding (January 18, 1910 – March 18, 1993) was an English-born American economist, educator, peace activist, poet, religious mystic, devoted Quaker, systems scientist, and interdisciplinary philosopher.[4][5] He published over three dozen books and over one-hundred dozen articles. Current Contents found him to be one of those rare authors of a “Citation Classic.” Indeed, even more rare, he was the author of two Citation Classics: The Image: Knowledge in Life and Society (1956) and Conflict and Defense: A General Theory (1962). He was cofounder of General Systems Theory and founder of numerous ongoing intellectual projects in economics and social science. He was married to Elise M. Boulding.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by a Quaker Woman

I went looking for a quote by a Nobel winner and found this instead.

Wikipedia

Elise M. Boulding (July 6, 1920 – June 24, 2010) was a Quaker sociologist, and author credited as a major contributor to creating the academic discipline of Peace and Conflict Studies. Her holistic, multidimensional approach to peace research sets her apart as an important scholar and activist in multiple fields. Her written works span several decades and range from discussion of family as a foundation for peace, to Quaker spirituality to reinventing the international “global culture.” Particularly of note is her emphasis on women and family in the peace process.

Elise Biorn-Hansen was born in Oslo, Norway in 1920. Her family moved to the United States when she was three years old.[1] She and her family were greatly affected by the outbreak of World War II and the German invasion of Norway. Elise became strongly convinced by living through the WWII years that violence was not the answer to the world’s problems and that if even her peaceful homeland was at risk, violence was truly a systemic world concern. In her youth, she became active in anti-war activities and converted to a historic peace church, the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). It was at a Quaker meeting in May 1941 that she met her future husband, Kenneth Boulding (1910–1993), a respected English economist who would collaborate extensively with Elise on her peace work.

Interesting. Everyone in economics studies Kenneth Boulding. I’ll do a quote by him tomorrow.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by the 1934 Winner of the Nobel Peace Prize

In his Wikipedia page it’s stated that The Soviet Union’s Vladimir Lenin viewed Arthur Henderson as stupid. What Henderson could not see is that for the left, social justice is not a real thing to be accomplished, but is rather a talking point to promote endless agitation and conflict. The emphasis in culture on social justice does not promote peace, but rather social justice promotes aggrieved peoples who are ready to go to war with each other.

His Nobel Prize was as much a waste as Obama’s.

Wikipedia

Arthur Henderson PC (13 September 1863 – 20 October 1935) was a British iron moulder and Labour politician. He was the first Labour cabinet minister, won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1934 and, uniquely, served three separate terms as Leader of the Labour Party in three different decades. He was popular among his colleagues, who called him “Uncle Arthur” in acknowledgement of his integrity, his devotion to the cause and his imperturbability. He was a transitional figure whose policies were, at first, close to those of the Liberal Party, and the trades unions rejected his emphasis on arbitration and conciliation, and thwarted his goal of unifying the Labour Party and the trade unions.