Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About Jews

Excerpt from Wikipedia

Corneliu Zelea Codreanu[a] (Romanian pronunciation: [korˈneliu ˈzele̯a koˈdre̯anu] (About this sound listen); born Corneliu Zelinski; September 13, 1899 – November 30, 1938), commonly known as Corneliu Codreanu, was a Romanian politician who was the founder and charismatic leader of the Iron Guard (also known as the Legionnaire movement), an ultra-nationalistic and violently antisemitic organization active throughout most of the interwar period. Generally seen as the main variety of local fascism, and noted for its Romanian Orthodox-inspired revolutionary message, the Iron Guard grew into an important actor on the Romanian political stage, coming into conflict with the political establishment and democratic forces, and often resorted to terrorism. The Legionnaires traditionally referred to Codreanu as Căpitanul (“The Captain”), and he held absolute authority over the organization until his death.

Codreanu, who began his career in the wake of World War I as an anticommunist and antisemitic agitator associated with A. C. Cuza and Constantin Pancu, was a co-founder of the National-Christian Defense League and assassin of the Iaşi Police prefect Constantin Manciu. Codreanu left Cuza to found a succession of far-right movements, rallying around him a growing segment of the country’s intelligentsia and peasant population, and inciting pogroms in various parts of Greater Romania. Outlawed by successive Romanian cabinets on several occasions, his Legion assumed different names and survived in the underground, during which time Codreanu formally delegated leadership to Gheorghe Cantacuzino-Grănicerul. Following Codreanu’s instructions, the Legion carried out assassinations of politicians it viewed as corrupt, including Prime Minister Ion G. Duca and his former associate Mihai Stelescu. Simultaneously, Corneliu Zelea Codreanu advocated Romania’s adherence to a military and political alliance with Nazi Germany.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by A Woman Preacher

Barbara Brown Taylor is one of Time’s 100 Most Influential People in the World.

Watch a biograpical video of Barbara Brown Taylor at PBS.

Wikipedia

Barbara Brown Taylor (born September 21, 1951) is an American Episcopal priest, professor, author and theologian and is one of the United States’ best known preachers.[1][2] In 2014, the TIME magazine placed her in its annual TIME 100 list of most influential people in the world. [3]

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About Resisting Tyranny

Wikipedia

Ezra Taft Benson (August 4, 1899 – May 30, 1994) was an American farmer, government official, and religious leader who served as the 15th United States Secretary of Agriculture during both presidential terms of Dwight D. Eisenhower and as the thirteenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1985 until his death in 1994.

Benson’s interest in politics could be seen in the subjects he chose for his biannual addresses at General Conference. In 1967, for example, he asked David O. McKay for permission to speak on “how the Communists are using the Negros to … foment trouble in the United States”.

Benson was an outspoken opponent of communism and socialism, and a supporter, but not a member, of the John Birch Society, which he praised as “the most effective non-church organization in our fight against creeping socialism and Godless Communism.”[6] He published a 1966 pamphlet entitled “Civil Rights, Tool of Communist Deception”.[7] In a similar vein, during a 1972 general conference of the LDS Church, Benson recommended that all members of the church read Gary Allen’s New World Order tract “None Dare Call it A Conspiracy”

Inspirational Quote of the Day: A List of Buddhist Quotes

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Mandy Hale

Hey, single guys. Heeeere’s Mandy. She’s single, a Christian, and a successful author.

Follow Mandy Hale on Twitter.

The website for Mandy’s successful book is thesinglewoman.net

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Charles Lindbergh

To learn more about how Lindbergh went from national hero to antisemite national zero as he tried to keep America out of World War II, read this article in Deseret News.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About Revenge

While this one has a great shot of two Grizzly bears fighting, the quote seems to me to encourage cowardice.

Maybe this one is closer to the truth?

Actually, bears often run away.