Breaking! Sweden Drops Rape Investigation of Wikileaks’ Julian Assange

Time

(STOCKHOLM) — Sweden’s top prosecutor said Friday she is dropping an investigation into a rape claim against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange after almost seven years.

The Swedish Prosecution Authority said in a statement Friday that Marianne Ny “has decided to discontinue the investigation.”

Assange took refuge in Ecuador’s embassy in London in 2012 to escape extradition to Sweden to answer questions about sex-crime allegations from two women. He has been there ever since, fearing that if he is arrested he might ultimately be extradited to the United States. Last month, President Donald Trump said he would support any decision by the Justice Department to charge Assange.

WikiLeaks tweeted after the Swedish announcement: “UK refuses to confirm or deny whether it has already received a US extradition warrant for Julian Assange. Focus now moves to UK,”

Friday’s announcement means Assange is no longer under any investigation in Sweden. But the Metropolitan Police said Assange is still subject to arrest for the “much less serious offense” of jumping bail in 2012.

The 45-year-old Australian computer hacker was wanted in Sweden for questioning over a rape allegation stemming from a 2010 visit.

“This is a total victory for Julian Assange. He is now free to leave the embassy when he wants. We have won the Assange case. He is of course happy and relieved. He has been critical that it has lasted that long,” Per E Samuelsson, his lawyer in Sweden, told Swedish Radio. Samuelsson was not immediately available for comments.

Assange still can’t leave the Ecuadorian embassy without being arrested:

Related: Iceland believed the FBI wanted to frame Assange.

Assange supporters fear that he will be extradited to the U.S. and put on trial.

A massive cyberattack targeted major websites across the internet — and WikiLeaks may be involved

outage map 2016-10-21 at 2.13.44 pm

Here’s another thing that Democrats and the mainstream media will blame on Russian puppet Donald Trump and his bosses in the Kremlin.

Muh Russians, muh Russians, muh Russians, …

Excerpt from Business Insider

Internet users around the world, but mostly in the US, reported that some top websites were not loading on Friday morning.

The affected sites include Amazon, Twitter, Netflix, Etsy, Github, and Spotify.

It was mostly resolved at 9:20 a.m. ET, but at 12:07 p.m. ET, the issue started to crop up again, according to one of the companies at the center of the apparent cyber attack.

At 4:16 p.m. ET, Dyn said that it was facing a third wave of attacks, CNBC reported.

Around 6:20 p.m. ET, Dyn said that the incident had been resolved, according to a status update on its website.

The issue appears to have something to do with DNS hosts — in particular, Dyn, one of the biggest DNS companies.

Domain Name Servers are a core part of the internet’s backbone. They translate what you type into your browser —www.businessinsider.com, for example — into IP addresses that computers can understand.

Dyn said on Friday that it suffering a DDoS attack, or a distributed denial of service. That basically means hackers are overwhelming Dyn’s servers with useless data and repeated load requests, preventing useful data — the Twitter IP address, for example — from getting through.

“The purpose of this attack is to overload the service in any way possible and make it stop working or be unreachable. In this case it was not Twitter or Github that got overloaded, those services work totally fine, but a service allowing you to reach them got overloaded,” Adam Surak, site reliability engineer at Algolia.com told Business Insider.

Who is responsible?
No group has taken credit for the DDoS attack yet, and Dyn says no attacker has contacted it.

The Department of Homeland Security is monitoring the attack, Politico’s Eric Geller reports. The FBI is also investigating, according to Reuters.

The attack does not seem to be state-sponored or directed, a senior US intelligence official told NBC News.

Dyn says that the attacks are “well planned and executed, coming from tens of millions of IP addresses at the same time.” One of the sources of the attack is internet-connected products like printers, DVRs, and appliances, often called the “internet of things.”

Code to wage DDoS attacks by hacking the internet of things was released earlier this month.

WikiLeaks says the attack is being done in support of its founder Julian Assange. Brian Krebs, a writer who was the first person to be hit with a internet of things DDoS, believes that criminals are extorting internet infrastructure companies and threatening them with DDoS.

He says that a trusted source tells him that there was “chatter in the cybercrime underground” discussing a plan to attack Dyn.

“Mr. Assange is still alive and WikiLeaks is still publishing. We ask supporters to stop taking down the US internet. You proved your point,” Wikileaks tweeted.