Trump Administration Revises Travel Ban To Expand Beyond Muslim-Majority Countries

President Trump is learning.

His new travel ban extends not just for 90 days as the original did, but indefinitely. And since he knows he’s going to be sued, he’s added two non-Muslim countries to the new ban in order to avoid accusations of discrimination against Muslims.

The new non-Muslim countries added to the ban are North Korea and Venezuela.

Ha. I doubt the U.S. gets any visitors from North Korea. I’ve never met one, for sure.

Excerpt from NPR

The Trump administration is updating its travel ban, just hours before it was set to expire. In a proclamation signed by President Trump on Sunday, the travel restrictions now include eight countries, a couple of which are not majority-Muslim, as had been the case with all the nations in the original ban.

Five countries in the previous ban remain under restriction: Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen and Somalia. Chad, North Korea and Venezuela have been added. The latter two are the first nations included in a version of the travel ban that do not have majority-Muslim populations, which has been a key point in litigation challenging the ban as discriminatory based on religion.

Sudan has been dropped from the order. Restrictions for Somalia will be relaxed for non-immigrant visitors, and restrictions for Iran will be relaxed for students and other exchange visitors.

The new restrictions on Chad and North Korea are a broad ban on nationals from those countries entering the U.S. For Venezuela, restrictions apply to government officials and their immediate family.

These changes are set to take effect on Oct. 18, though the restrictions on Sudan will be lifted immediately, as a result of security baselines defined by the administration.

The White House said in a statement, “The President has also determined that while Iraq did not meet the baseline, entry restrictions are not warranted under the September 24 proclamation.”

“Following an extensive review by the Department of Homeland Security, we are taking action today to protect the safety and security of the American people by establishing a minimum security baseline for entry into the United States,” President Trump said in the statement. “We cannot afford to continue the failed policies of the past, which present an unacceptable danger to our country. My highest obligation is to ensure the safety and security of the American people, and in issuing this new travel order, I am fulfilling that sacred obligation.”

The White House also hailed the proclamation as “aimed at creating — for the first time in history — minimum requirements for international cooperation to support visa and immigration vetting and adjudications for individuals seeking entry to the United States.”

Trump Treason? Alleged Deal with Democrats Allows “Dreamers ” to Stay

UNPINNED 9/14/2017. PINNED TO THE TOP OF THE HOMEPAGE. SCROLL DOWN FOR NEWEST POSTS.

There’s significant disagreement about the breaking news that President Trump has struck a deal with Democrats to amnesty what would appear to be 800,000 so-called Dreamers. In reality, once they have amnesty, the door opens for millions more via a court ruling.

Here’s the story from the AP, followed by some views that claim that Trump has betrayed his base, with others dissenting.

All I can say is that if Trump has struck a deal with the swamp creatures that goes soft on DACA, I’d be shocked.

Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — The top House and Senate Democrats said Wednesday they had reached agreement with President Donald Trump to protect thousands of younger immigrants from deportation and fund some border security enhancements — not including Trump’s long-sought border wall.

The agreement, the latest instance of Trump ditching his own party to make common cause with the opposition, was announced by Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer and House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi following a White House dinner that Republican lawmakers weren’t invited to attend. It would enshrine protections for the nearly 800,000 immigrants brought illegally to this country as kids who had benefited from former President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program, which provided temporary work permits and shielded recipients from deportation.

Trump ended the program earlier this month and gave Congress six months to come up with a legislative fix before the statuses of the so-called “Dreamers” begin to expire.

“We agreed to enshrine the protections of DACA into law quickly, and to work out a package of border security, excluding the wall, that’s acceptable to both sides,” Pelosi and Schumer said in a joint statement.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders partially disputed their characterization, saying over Twitter that “excluding the wall was certainly not agreed to.”

Either way, it was the second time in two weeks that Trump cut out Republicans to reach a deal with Pelosi and Schumer. A person briefed on the meeting, who demanded anonymity to discuss it, said the deal specifies bipartisan legislation called the DREAM Act that provides eventual citizenship for the young immigrants.

House Republicans would normally rebel over such an approach, which many view as amnesty for law-breakers. It remains to be seen how conservatives’ loyalty to Trump will affect their response to a policy they would have opposed under other circumstances.

The House’s foremost immigration hardliner, GOP Rep. Steve King of Iowa, made clear that he, for one, was not happy.

Addressing Trump over Twitter, King wrote that if the reports were true, “Trump base is blown up, destroyed, irreparable, and disillusioned beyond repair. No promise is credible.”

Earlier Wednesday, during a White House meeting with moderate House members from both parties, Trump had urged lawmakers to come up with a bipartisan solution for the “Dreamers.”

“We don’t want to forget DACA,” Trump told the members at the meeting. “We want to see if we can do something in a bipartisan fashion so that we can solve the DACA problem and other immigration problems.”

Foreshadowing what was to take place later that evening, Trump said he would be open to separating the wall issue from the question of the younger immigrants, as long as the wall got dealt with eventually.

At Thursday night’s dinner, “the president was clear he would press for the wall but separate from this agreement,” said Pelosi spokesman Drew Hammill.

The apparent deal is the latest example of Trump’s sudden pivot to bipartisanship after months of railing against Democrats as “obstructionist.” He has also urged them to join him in overhauling the nation’s tax code, among other priorities.

Why America Needs Trump’s Wall

As one commenter noted on Twitter, the number of illegals in federal prison would be even greater if there were no so-called sanctuary cities. The numbers here do not include those in state prisons.

Politico: Trump has decided to end DACA, with 6-month delay

It looks like the end for dreamers. This is big if true.

By delaying the start of the termination of DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals), El Presidente Trump takes a bite out of the firestorm of anger that’s going to take place.

Since Paul Ryan will step in and try to persuade Congress to restore DACA, this gives us a huge opportunity to demonize him: “Mr. Ryan, why are for denying American children their dreams. You’re giving hundreds of thousands of jobs to non-citizens, sir. Why?”

If we get lucky, Mexicans will be joined by the Antifa and riots will break out. If you’re white and older or sickly, don’t wear your MAGA caps out in public for a while. There’s no sense in making yourself a target.

Politico

President Donald Trump has decided to end the Obama-era program that grants work permits to undocumented immigrants who arrived in the country as children, according to two sources familiar with his thinking. Senior White House aides huddled Sunday afternoon to discuss the rollout of a decision likely to ignite a political firestorm — and fulfill one of the president’s core campaign promises.

Trump has wrestled for months with whether to do away with the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. He has faced strong warnings from members of his own party not to scrap the program and struggled with his own misgivings about targeting minors for deportation.

Conversations with Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who argued that Congress — rather than the executive branch — is responsible for writing immigration law, helped persuade the president to terminate the program, the two sources said, though White House aides caution that — as with everything in the Trump White House — nothing is set in stone until an official announcement has been made.

In a nod to reservations held by many lawmakers, the White House plans to delay the enforcement of the president’s decision for six months, giving Congress a window to act, according to one White House official. But a senior White House aide said that chief of staff John Kelly, who has been running the West Wing policy process on the issue, “thinks Congress should’ve gotten its act together a lot longer ago.”

Trump is expected to announce his decision on Tuesday, and the White House informed House Speaker Paul Ryan of the president’s decision on Sunday morning, according to a source close to the administration. Ryan had said during a radio interview on Friday that he didn’t think the president should terminate DACA, and that Congress should act on the issue.

Neither the White House nor a spokesman for Ryan immediately responded to requests for comment.

The president’s expected announcement is likely to shore up his base, which rallied behind his broader campaign message about the importance of enforcing the country’s immigration laws and securing the border. At the same time, the president’s decision is likely to be one of the most contentious of his early administration, opposed by leaders of both parties and by the political establishment more broadly.

The White House and Congress have tried to pass the issue off on each other – with each arguing that the other is responsible for determining the fate of the approximately 800,000 undocumented immigrants who are benefiting from DACA. Though most Republicans believe that rolling back DACA is a solid legal decision, they are conscious of the difficult emotional terrain. Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch joined Ryan in cautioning Trump against rolling back the program.

The president is likely to couch his decision in legalese. Many on the right, even those who support protections for children brought into the country illegally through no fault of their own, argue that DACA is unconstitutional because former President Barack Obama carried it out unilaterally instead of working through Congress.

Some Republican lawmakers, including Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, have said that Congress needs to pass a law to protect the so-called Dreamers.

“My hope is that as part of this process we can work on a way to deal with this issue and solve it through legislation, which is the right way to do it and the constitutional way to do it,” Rubio told CNN in June.

Trump’s expected decision to scrap DACA represents another challenge for Ryan and fellow congressional Republicans, who are facing an end-of-September deadline to avert a government shutdown and government debt default, while also tackling a Hurricane Harvey relief package and a major tax reform push.

Haha. Score one for Jeff Sessions. Thanks Jeff for persuading Trump to MAGA.

It looks like Ivanka lost the argument this time.

Construction Set to Begin in Two Weeks on Prototypes for Trump’s Wall

MAGA, baby! At this point the wall is more a symbol of the will to resist the globalists than anything I can think of.

Washington Post via NOLA

By The Washington Post
WASHINGTON – The Trump administration on Thursday announced it has chosen four companies to build concrete prototypes of the president’s much-touted border wall.

Construction of the prototypes, to take place in San Diego, is the first step in fulfilling Trump’s campaign promise of building a “big, beautiful” wall stretching along the 2,000-mile Mexico border.

“Today we mark a significant milestone,” said Ronald Vitiello, acting deputy commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. “This is the first tangible result of the action planning that has gone on. This is the use of the resources we had available for this year.” There appears to be a lack of political will to fund a continuous barrier. Congress has set aside $20 million in the current budget to build the prototypes but has not appropriated any other money for the wall. Each of the four contracts are worth between just under $400,000 and $500,000, Vitiello said.

The companies chosen are: Caddell Construction in Montgomery, Alabama, Fisher Sand & Gravel/DBA Fisher Industries in Tempe, Arizona, Texas Sterling Construction in Houston, Texas, and W.G. Yates & Sons Construction in Philadelphia, Mississippi.

Construction is expected to begin on the concrete prototypes in two weeks, Vitiello said, and should be complete this fall within 30 days after breaking ground. Each prototype will be 30-feet long and up to 30-feet high, and will be located within close proximity of each other, he said. They will act as a secondary barrier in a border enforcement zone that already has a fence.

Homeland Security officials will then spend 30 to 60 days using small hand tools to test the prototypes to see how resistant they are to tampering and penetration, Vitiello said. Officials will consider aesthetics as well as anti-climb features and how technology could be used to complement the physical barrier.

“We are not just asking for a physical structure,” Vitiello said. “We’re asking for all the tools that help secure the border.”

The administration was originally expected to announce its decision on prototypes in June, but the contracting process was delayed after protests from two companies that had not made the list of finalists.

The Government Accountability Office dismissed the protests last Friday, but unsuccessful bidders now have another opportunity to file new protests, which could further delay construction.

During his visit last week to Phoenix, Trump threatened to shut down the government if Congress does not agree to fund his wall in September.

“Believe me, if we have to close down our government, we’re building that wall,” Trump said during his Arizona rally. ” The American people voted for immigration control. That’s one of the reasons I’m here, and that is what the American people deserve, and they’re going to get it.”

Rand Paul: They’re Going to Keep Obamacare

Rand Paul is trying to save President Trump from a horrific mistake, which would be signing into law any of the current Republican healthcare bills that enrich the insurance companies, while leaving more uninsured people.

Excerpt from Breitbart

I miss the old days, when Republicans stood for repealing Obamacare. Republicans across the country and every member of my caucus campaigned on repeal – often declaring they would tear out Obamacare “root and branch!”

What happened?

Now too many Republicans are falling all over themselves to stuff hundreds of billions of taxpayers’ dollars into a bill that doesn’t repeal Obamacare and feeds Big Insurance a huge bailout.

Obamacare regulations? Still here. Taxes? Many still in place, totaling hundreds of billions of dollars.

Insurance company bailouts? Those, too. Remember when Republicans complained about Obamacare’s risk corridors? Remember when we called the corridors nothing more than insurance company bailouts? I remember when one prominent GOP candidate during a presidential debate explicitly called out the Obamacare risk corridors as a bailout to insurance companies. Does anyone else?

Now, the Senate GOP plan being put forward is chock full of insurance bailout money – to the tune of nearly $200 billion. Republicans, present company excluded, now support the idea of lowering your insurance premium by giving a subsidy to the insurance company.

Remarkable. If the GOP now supports an insurance stabilization fund to lower insurance prices, maybe they now support a New Car stabilization fund to lower the price of cars. Or maybe the GOP would support an iPhone stabilization fund to lower the price of phones.

The possibilities are limitless once you accept that the federal government should subsidize prices. I remember when Republicans favored the free choice of the marketplace.

The Senate Obamacare bill does not repeal Obamacare. I want to repeat that so everyone realizes why I’ll vote “no” as it stands now:

The Senate Obamacare bill does not repeal Obamacare. Not even close.

In fact, the Senate GOP bill codifies and likely expands many aspects of Obamacare.

The Senate Obamacare-lite bill codifies a federal entitlement to insurance. With the Senate GOP bill, Republicans, for the first time, will signal that they favor a key aspect of Obamacare – federal taxpayer funding of private insurance purchases.

The bill will transfer billions of dollars to people who will then transfer billions of dollars to insurance companies. What a great business model – encourage the federal government to use taxpayer money to buy a private company’s product. Great business model, that is, if you are Big Insurance. Remarkable.

The Senate Obamacare-lite bill does what the Democrats forgot to do – appropriate billions for Obamacare’s cost-sharing reductions, aka subsidies. Really? Republicans are going to fund Obamacare subsidies that the Democrats forgot to fund?

Karl Denninger has been writing the most intelligent material on healthcare for years now. He’s shown how if we stay the course, the healthcare and health insurance industries will bankrupt the country and drive most of us into complete poverty. His work with the numbers is scary stuff.

Karl has written a one sentence law that no one in Congress will look at because they’re all in the pockets of big pharma and the big insurance and healthcare companies.

Market Ticker

Here it is:

“Notwithstanding any other provision in state or federal law, a person who presents themselves while uninsured to any provider of a medical good or service shall not be charged a price greater than that which Medicare pays for the same drug, device, service or combination thereof.”

That’s it.

One sentence.

If you want to add a penalty clause with it I propose the following:

“Any bill rendered to a person in excess of said amounts shall (1) be deemed void, with all services and goods provided as a gift without charge or taxable consequence to said consumer but not deductible by said physician or facility from any income or occupational tax and (2) is immediately due to the customer in the exact amount presented as liquidated damages for the fraud so-attempted.”

It ends the “Chargemaster” ripoff game.

It ends the $150,000 snake bite or the $80,000 scorpion sting.

It ends the $500,000 cancer treatment.

It ends all of that, immediately and instantly.

I remind you that Medicare is required to set pay rates by law at a level that in fact are profitable — that is, above cost by a modest amount — for everything it covers. Further, those pay rates are audited regularly to prove that they in fact are above cost.

Does this solve every problem? No, and in fact that would leave alone the existing monopolistic pricing systems that many medical providers, whether they be drug makers, device makers, service providers or otherwise have in place. It would do exactly nothing to get rid of the 10 paper pushers hired for every doctor or nurse, none of whom ever provide one second of care to an actual person through their entire time of employment.

But it would instantly end walking into an emergency room and getting hammered with a $50,000 bill for something that Medicare will pay $5,000 for.

Denninger has many more articles on his site about health care, most notably revolving around the idea that the anti-trust laws (Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890) should be applied to the healthcare industry.

He’s well worth the read because his common sense exposes the hoax that the Republicans and Democrats, with the exception of Rand Paul, are pulling on us.

Trump Did Something That Benefits Mostly White Men and the Press Isn’t Saying **** About It

Although the alt-right is anti-war, it’s not anti-veteran.

For everyone on the alt-right who has blasted President Trump, make note that he’s trying to fulfill his campaign promises. The problem is that the coalition of RINOs and Democrats, along with the press, has held him back. Once in a while, like yesterday, the anti-Trump coalition finds something it can agree with him about.

The effort to reform the Veteran’s Administration (VA) is going to benefit mostly elderly white men, who make up the bulk of older vets. These guys were treated shamefully by NegObama. Black racism toward white men? Much!

Now the Obama anti-white racism can be rooted out, thanks to Trump.

Three cheers for Donald Trump!

Click on Detroit

Trump signs VA reform bill, making good on a campaign promise
Bill passed House 368-55, unanimously in Senate

President Donald Trump made good on a campaign promise Friday, signing into law legislation that gives leadership at the Department of Veterans Affairs more power to fire failed employees and protect those who uncover wrongdoing at the agency.

“For many years, the government failed to keep its promises to our veterans. We all remember the nightmare that veterans suffered during the VA scandals that were exposed a few years ago,” Trump said during remarks in the East Room of the White House.

“Veterans were put on secret wait lists, given the wrong medication, given the bad treatments, and ignored in moments of crisis for them,” he said. “Many veterans died waiting for a simple doctor’s appointment. What happened was a national disgrace, and yet some of the employees involved in these scandals remained on the payrolls. Outdated laws kept the government from holding those who failed our veterans accountable.”

“Today,” Trump said, “we are finally changing those laws.”

The law, which won bipartisan support in both the Senate and House, comes after years of stories about chaos inside the VA, including CNN investigations in 2013 and 2014 that found dozens of veterans died or were seriously injured because of long wait times at hospitals across the country.

“In just a short time we’ve already achieved transformative change at the VA, and believe me, we’re just getting started,” Trump said.

The measure passed the House by a 368-55 vote earlier this month. It passed the Senate by a unanimous voice vote.

Trump promised throughout his 2016 presidential campaign to reform the Department of Veterans Affairs, and tapped David Shulkin, a former VA official under President Barack Obama, to head the reform effort.

Trump called the department the “most corrupt” and “most incompetently run agency in the United States” during the campaign when he released a 10-point reform plan for the department.

And in a meeting earlier this year with veterans group, Trump vowed to make good on his promises.

“As commander in chief, I will not accept substandard service for our great veterans,” he said.

Trump will be joined by several lawmakers during the signing ceremony, including Sens. John Boozman of Arkansas, Tom Cotton of Arkansas and Dan Sullivan of Alaska.

The VA scandal during the Obama administration engulfed the department, leading to the resignation of Secretary Eric Shinseki after CNN uncovered the existence of a secret scheduling list at the VA in Phoenix.

The new law gives Shulkin and future VA secretaries the power to get rid of employees who break department rules and increases whistleblower protections.

Shulkin pushed for this kind of reform bill during his confirmation process and in the first months of his tenure, arguing that the department was “still in critical condition” and more accountability was needed to improve the treatment veterans receive.