Dove soap ad that shows a black woman turning herself white sparks Negroid backlash

That Dove soap ad above gave the perpetually aggrieved Negro a chance to complain. It also gave white (and Jewish) social justice warriors the chance to virtue signal. Otherwise, nobody would really care about the ad.

I don’t “get” the ad at all, but if it triggered SJWs, then great.

Excerpt from MSN

The Dove brand sheepishly admitted that it had “missed the mark” with a not-so-vaguely racist advertisement that has made it the latest target of consumer rage.

But many angry and befuddled Dove lovers spent the weekend wondering what mark Dove was trying to hit in the first place.

The ire-inducing advertisement — a static compilation of four photos — was released Saturday afternoon. The first frame shows a dark-skinned woman in what appears to be a bathroom, a bottle of Dove body wash in the lower right-hand corner of the picture.

In subsequent frames, the woman reaches down and lifts up her shirt (and apparently the rest of her skin/costume) to reveal a smiling white woman.

Offended Dove users erupted, and the company quickly apologized. But the two-sentence Twitter note, and a slightly longer message on Facebook left it unclear what exactly the ad was trying to convey.

Unilever, Dove’s parent company, did not respond to Washington Post requests for comment.

The vacuum of information was filled by people on social media who peppered the company with comments and rhetorical questions, none of them good.

Was Dove saying that inside every black woman is a smiling redheaded white woman? Was Dove invoking the centuries-old stereotype that black is dirty and white is pure? Or that black skin can or should be cleansed away?

And perhaps the biggest question of all: Did Dove really believe that the ad would make more people of color want to buy its products?

“What exactly were yall going for?,” one self-described Dove consumer said on the company’s Facebook page. “What was the mark . . . I mean anyone with eyes can see how offensive this is. Not one person on your staff objected to this? Wow. Will not be buying your products anymore.”

Others wondered whether the problem was a lack of diversity at Dove. They pointed to historical examples of racist ads about soap so good that it apparently washes the melanin right out of your skin.

What if the ad were reversed, with the ad starting with the white woman, while ending with a black woman? I suppose that message would be telling every white woman to find her inner Nigga and let it all out.

Like this one:
TRANSRACIAL LOON RACHEL DOLEZAL.

43 Anti-White Commercials (Video)

Get through the first one and the commercials advertise brands you’re more likely to be familiar with. The Seven-Up commericial at the 3 minute mark or so is especially disgusting.

All of the companies featured and their ad agencies deserve to be annihilated. By any means necessary.

Twenty one minutes.

From the youtube comments:

‘ll never buy shit from any of these motherfuckers. We need to find out who the ad agencies are and pay them a visit. I hope you continue to make more of these. As you know the ADL is now censoring Youtube.

“Jew Haters” Trending on Twitter as Facebook Exposed for Running Ads Aimed at People Who Hate Jews

Fools or trolls are actually calling Jew Mark Zuckerberg a Nazi for wanting to make a few sheckels by selling ads to people who have some distaste for our Jewish friends.

When I put this post together about 8 P.M Central time U.S. “Jew Haters” was trending on Twitter. And Mark Zuckerberg was getting hammered.

Huffington Post

Want to market Nazi memorabilia, or recruit marchers for a far-right rally? Facebook’s self-service ad-buying platform had the right audience for you.

Until this week, when we asked Facebook about it, the world’s largest social network enabled advertisers to direct their pitches to the news feeds of almost 2,300 people who expressed interest in the topics of “Jew hater,” “How to burn jews,” or, “History of ‘why jews ruin the world.’”

To test if these ad categories were real, we paid $30 to target those groups with three “promoted posts” — in which a ProPublica article or post was displayed in their news feeds. Facebook approved all three ads within 15 minutes.

After we contacted Facebook, it removed the anti-Semitic categories — which were created by an algorithm rather than by people — and said it would explore ways to fix the problem, such as limiting the number of categories available or scrutinizing them before they are displayed to buyers.

“There are times where content is surfaced on our platform that violates our standards,” said Rob Leathern, product management director at Facebook. “In this case, we’ve removed the associated targeting fields in question. We know we have more work to do, so we’re also building new guardrails in our product and review processes to prevent other issues like this from happening in the future.”

Facebook’s advertising has become a focus of national attention since it disclosed last week that it had discovered $100,000 worth of ads placed during the 2016 presidential election season by “inauthentic” accounts that appeared to be affiliated with Russia.

Like many tech companies, Facebook has long taken a hands off approach to its advertising business. Unlike traditional media companies that select the audiences they offer advertisers, Facebook generates its ad categories automatically based both on what users explicitly share with Facebook and what they implicitly convey through their online activity.

Traditionally, tech companies have contended that it’s not their role to censor the Internet or to discourage legitimate political expression. In the wake of the violent protests in Charlottesville by right-wing groups that included self-described Nazis, Facebook and other tech companies vowed to strengthen their monitoring of hate speech.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote at the time that “there is no place for hate in our community,” and pledged to keep a closer eye on hateful posts and threats of violence on Facebook. “It’s a disgrace that we still need to say that neo-Nazis and white supremacists are wrong — as if this is somehow not obvious,” he wrote.

But Facebook apparently did not intensify its scrutiny of its ad buying platform. In all likelihood, the ad categories that we spotted were automatically generated because people had listed those anti-Semitic themes on their Facebook profiles as an interest, an employer or a “field of study.” Facebook’s algorithm automatically transforms people’s declared interests into advertising categories.

Artificial intelligence hasn’t been taught political correctness yet. It’s antisemitic. But it doesn’t know it’s antisemitic.

Twitter is overreacting to this minor incident which harmed no one.

Google Apologizes After Major Brands Yank YouTube Ads Over Racist Content

CHEERIOS CEREAL FAMILY FROM 2014 AD.

One man’s hate is another man’s truth.

As you will see in this news report, advertisers want nothing to do with “hate.” So why so many mixed race couples in ads? Why so much denigration of the white male, always portraying him as a goofus?

Advertisers feel like they can insult my race and my sex with impunity. Well, we’re awake now and we hate your hypocrisy and the insults you peddle.

Google may kowtow to you, but we’re learning to live without your products. Your boycott of the truth expressed on youtube isn’t going to win you any friends.

NBC News

Google’s EMEA president of business and operations has apologized for the misplacement of advertising next to extremist content on its video site YouTube.

“There have been stories over the past few days about brands appearing against content that they wouldn’t like to appear against and particularly on YouTube, and so for me it is a good opportunity for me to say, first and foremost, to say sorry this should not happen and we need to do better,” Matt Brittin said at a press briefing Monday at the start of industry conference Advertising Week Europe in London.

Brands including HSBC, U.K. retailer Marks and Spencer and L’Oreal have pulled advertising from YouTube over the past few days, while agency group Havas has paused ads from U.K. clients including Domino’s Pizza and Hyundai Kia pending discussions with Google.

Speeding up the Review Process
Brittin said Google, which has the world’s biggest digital advertising platform, has invested “millions” and has thousands of people working to make sure “advertising practices are good.”

“I’ve spoken personally to a number of advertisers. Those that I have spoken to, we have been talking about a handful of impressions, and pennies not pounds of spend, but however small or big the issue, it is an important issue that we address,” he said.

“We’ve got a comprehensive review under way — we have for some time — looking at how can we improve here and we are accelerating that review.”

Unilever Chief Marketing Officer Keith Weed, who was with Brittin at the briefing, declined to comment on whether it had pulled advertising for any of its brands — which range from deodorant Axe (Lynx in the U.K.) to detergent Surf — from YouTube.

“We won’t make any public statement. I’m a great believer in talking about where the industry needs to get to, and what are the things we need to [do] collectively, the first accountability does go to the media companies because at the end of the day we are spending our money on their platform,” he said.

“I think the best way to do negotiations with any supplier is one on one and in private, and so you won’t find us coming out and making big public statements about particular customers. And we are working hand in hand,” Weed added.

How to Monitor Content Without Censoring Content
About 400 hours of content is uploaded to YouTube every minute, Brittin said, claiming that 98 percent of “removals” happen within 24 hours and adding that it will be looking at its policies, controls and how those are enforced. But it has a job to do in making sure it doesn’t remove content that is controversial, but not illegal, for example.

“It is not as simple as it might seem, so you might say: Why don’t you just exclude content that relates to war or that relates to politics? Well actually if you were to do that you would exclude important news content or documentary content.”

“Firstly on policies, this is about what content within YouTube do we deem to be safe for advertisers, and we’re going to raise the bar on that,” Brittin said. “That would include things like looking at our definition of hate speech, or our definition of inflammatory content, so that we raise the bar on what is deemed acceptable for advertising.”

Google expects to make further announcements on how it is tackling the problem of ads appearing next to extreme content “in the coming days,” he added.

Pivotal Research Group on Monday downgraded Alphabet stock from buy to hold after media buying agency Havas pulled spending from YouTube and Google Display Network in the U.K.

Coming Home for Christmas | Heathrow Airport

Heathrow Airport has a Christmas ad this year, joining a long list of British companies offering us some holiday cheer. The ad has over a million views already and it’s still 38 days (?) until Christmas.

Published on Nov 14, 2016

Throughout their 70 years, Heathrow have specialised in reconnecting people with their loved ones, especially at this time of year, because coming home for Christmas is the best gift of all. Among the millions of seasonal passengers, there are some extra-special arrivals that have made it home in time for the big day…

Have A Laugh Video: My Shiney Hiney

It’s a real product.