Youtube Undertaking New Censorship Program in Cooperation with ADL

Even if Google and Youtube are private companies, there’s a free speech issue in play with today’s announcement because they are unregulated public utilities, according to Trump policy adviser Steve Bannon.

Mike Cernovich, Mark Dice, and Paul Joseph Watson may be affected by this new policy. More hard core thinkers on the right, such as Jared Taylor, Richard Spencer, Tara McCarthy, and Varge Vikernes, are really likely to see damage done to their effort to communicate.

Since the ADL (Anti-Defamation League) considers realistic assessments of race and religion to be hate, the involvement of the ADL in this program bodes ill for our ability to find the information we need.

Breitbart

Content creators on YouTube who follow all of the site’s rules may still face censorship by the platform, under new plans announced by Google.

According to a post on YouTube’s official blog, videos will now be subject to the rule of the mob. If enough users flag a video as “hate speech” or “violent extremism,” YouTube may impose restrictions on the content even if it breaks none of the platform’s rules.

We’ll soon be applying tougher treatment to videos that aren’t illegal but have been flagged by users as potential violations of our policies on hate speech and violent extremism. If we find that these videos don’t violate our policies but contain controversial religious or supremacist content, they will be placed in a limited state. The videos will remain on YouTube behind an interstitial, won’t be recommended, won’t be monetized, and won’t have key features including comments, suggested videos, and likes.

YouTube has also rolled out a “trusted flagger” program, in which 15 “expert NGOs and institutions” to help them identify hate speech and extremism on their platform.

Among these organizations are the No Hate Speech Movement, a left-wing project pushed by the Council of Europe, as well as the Anti-Defamation League, an organization whose president has been accused of “manufacturing outrage” by the World Jewish Congress.

YouTube is also planning to artificially alter its search results so that searches for “sensitive” topics on YouTube no longer return the most popular videos, but a “playlist of curated YouTube videos that directly confront and debunk violent extremist messages.”

The platform also plans to artificially promote videos created via its “Creators for Change” program, which, in YouTube’s words, features creators who are “using their voices and creativity to speak out against hate speech, xenophobia and extremism.”

We’ve started rolling out features from Jigsaw’s Redirect Method to YouTube. When people search for sensitive keywords on YouTube, they will be redirected towards a playlist of curated YouTube videos that directly confront and debunk violent extremist messages. We also continue to amplify YouTube voices speaking out against hate and radicalization through our YouTube Creators for Change program. Just last week, the U.K. chapter of Creators for Change, Internet Citizens, hosted a two-day workshop for 13-18 year-olds to help them find a positive sense of belonging online and learn skills on how to participate safely and responsibly on the internet.

YouTube framed its blog post around fighting “terror content,” yet their announcement also strays into areas that have nothing to do with fighting terrorism, like the company’s diversity efforts. The blog post boasts about YouTube’s involvement with the “Creators for Change workshop” in which “creators teamed up with Indonesia’s Maarif Institute to teach young people about the importance of diversity, pluralism, and tolerance.”

ADL Jews Create Hate List That Includes McInnes, Cernovich, and Even Tara McCarthy (Plus One HUGE Surprise)

Some of the people on the ADL list of people they call haters are really rather meek and mild. David Duke is NOT on the list, but the alt-light’s Mike Cernovich, Gavin McIness, and sweet Tara McCarthy are all there.

WE LIKE TARA HERE.

Excerpt from the ADL

In just one year, the alt right has gone from relative obscurity to being one of the United States’ most visible extremist movements. This stratospheric rise is due in large part to the rhetoric employed during the 2016 presidential campaign, which granted implicit approval to the once-taboo hallmarks of the far right – overt racism, anti-Semitism, xenophobia, misogyny, and anti-Muslim bigotry.

The alt right capitalized on the moment by amplifying those messages while loudly rejecting mainstream conservatism and its followers (often referred to as “cucks”).

You can’t discuss the alt right without mentioning the “alt lite,” a loosely connected movement of right-wing activists who reject the overtly white supremacist ideology of the alt right, but whose hateful impact is more significant than their “lite” name suggests. The alt lite embraces misogyny and xenophobia, and abhors “political correctness” and the left.

While the alt right has been around for years, the current iteration is still figuring out what it is – and isn’t. And it’s early days for the alt lite, which means both movements’ ideologies are still somewhat fluid, as are the lines that separate them. Numerous examples in our list of “Who’s Who” demonstrate that “membership” in the alt lite does not preclude working with people on the alt right (and vice versa).

What is the Alt Right?
The alt right (short for “alternative right”) is a segment of the white supremacist movement consisting of a loose network of racists and anti-Semites who reject mainstream conservatism in favor of politics that embrace implicit or explicit racist, anti-Semitic and white supremacist ideology. Many seek to re-inject such bigoted ideas into the conservative movement in the United States. The alt right skews younger than other far right groups, and is very active online, using racist memes and message forums on 4chan, 8chan and certain corners of Reddit.

What is the Alt Lite?
The term “alt lite” was created by the alt right to differentiate itself from right-wing activists who refused to publicly embrace white supremacist ideology.

Today, the alt lite, sometimes referred to as the New Right, is loosely-connected movement whose adherents generally shun white supremacist thinking, but who are in step with the alt right in their hatred of feminists and immigrants, among others. Many within the alt lite sphere are virulently anti-Muslim; the group abhors everyone on “the left” and traffics in conspiracy theories, including #Pizzagate, which claimed there was evidence of a child slavery ring operating inside a DC pizzeria. The series of increasingly outrageous lies led to death threats against the pizzeria’s owner and employees, and ultimately resulted in a gunman opening fire inside the restaurant in an attempt to “save” the imaginary children.

Some former alt right cheerleaders, including Mike Cernovich, migrated to the alt lite after refusing to openly espouse the alt right’s explicitly white supremacist beliefs. Like the alt right, the alt lite is largely populated by young people, and has a prolific online presence, using blogs and podcasts to broadcast dissatisfaction with the media and what they sweepingly refer to as “globalization.”

What’s the Difference?
Alt right writer and white supremacist Greg Johnson describes the difference between alt right and alt lite this way: “The alt light is defined by civic nationalism as opposed to racial nationalism,” which is a defining characteristic of the alt right.

But while the alt right and alt lite are theoretically distinct – and include a number of warring factions, as seen at dueling June 2017 rallies in Washington DC – there is crossover between them. There are a number of people and groups who walk the line between alt right and alt lite, to the extent that it’s not always easy – or even possible — to tell which side they’re on. The Proud Boys, an alt lite, right-wing activist group founded by Gavin McInnes and dedicated to “Reinstating a Spirit of Western chauvinism,” is a good example of a group toeing that line; some of their members support alt right figures and events, while others have made a point of steering clear of anything associated with white supremacist beliefs.

Click on the link above to read biographical sketches and see a photo of all the so-called haters.

But here’s the real shocker: Brittany Pettibone made the list. Those damn f*cking Jews. How dare they try to get her killed too???!!!

Brittany Pettibone writes science fiction and co-hosts the “Virtue of the West” podcast with Tara McCarthy. The podcast encourages listeners to “reconnect with the traditional values that once made Western Civilization great, including but not limited to the glorification of the nuclear family, motherhood, masculinity, femininity, etiquette, traditional gender roles and love of one’s own culture, race and country.” Pettibone, unlike McCarthy, does not explicitly identify as part of the alt right, but she walks the very thin line that separates that group from the alt lite. Whatever her personal beliefs, Pettibone uses her podcast to amplify the views of the alt right by interviewing members of the movement.

N.J. Welfare Fraud Arrests Spark So-Called Anti-Semitic Speech on Social Media

It’s been a new Holocaust for Jews in New Jersey this last week. A sheet that said, “Heebs will not divide us” was draped over Holocaust memorial. Fliers were set out. And social media was abuzz with negative comments about the wealthy Jews who allegedly stole $2 million by scamming the welfare system.

Poor Jews. Always the victim when they dindu nuffins.

MSN

ASBURY PARK, N.J. — The social media comments on Facebook and other sites were raw, hateful.

The outpouring of invectives was sparked by the arrest last week of 14 residents of Lakewood, N.J., including the rabbi of a congregation, on public assistance fraud charges. The early morning raids ignited a firestorm of anti-Semitism against a municipality of 100,000 that has a majority of Orthodox Jewish residents.

“The allegations and the charges levied against (the defendants) have nothing to do with their religion,” said Joshua Cohen, regional director of the Anti-Defamation League, New Jersey Region. “That’s why we’re deeply concerned when we see comments online, whether it’s on newspaper websites or social media, that are anti-Semitic.”

The hate speech moved off the Internet and into the streets. Hate fliers spread around the township over the weekend, said residents, who provided photos of the fliers. A white sheet hung over a Holocaust memorial at the Congregation Sons of Israel. Covering the stone memorial, the cloth banner used an anti-Semitic slur and promoted a website for a white supremacy group, authorities said.

Lakewood Police Detective Lt. Gregory Staffordsmith said the incidents were being investigated.

“We do believe that this recent rash of anti-Semitic incidents is directly related to the recent arrests in our town. We have not had any other incidents before,” said Lakewood Police Chief Gregory Meyer. “We will not tolerate this kind of behavior and we are working with (the) state and the Ocean County (N.J.) Prosecutor’s Office in an attempt to make arrests. We will look to prosecute all incidents of bias crimes that take place against our citizens.”

Many of the online comments zeroed in on the religion of the accused and made sweeping, disparaging, even dehumanizing statements about all Jewish people.

Although the primary vehicle for these hateful comments has been social media platforms such as Facebook, some Lakewood residents have experienced it in person.

THE JEWS ARRESTED FOR WELFARE FRAUD.

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“(((Heebs))) Will Not Divide Us” Banner Hung at Holocaust Memorial

A mystery surrounds how the banner you see above came to be draped over a Holocaust Memorial in Lakewood, New Jersey, USA.

As far as I’m concerned, if the only thing that happened is the banner was displayed, then no crime was committed.

The vandalism done by city governments taking down Confederate statues is the real hate crime.

Good luck to the guys who made the banner. It’s an expression of free speech.

philly.com

LAKEWOOD, N.J. (AP) – Vandals posted a banner containing an anti-Jewish slur on a Holocaust memorial in front of a New Jersey shore town synagogue where several residents were recently accused of misrepresenting their incomes to improperly obtain public welfare benefits.

Photos posted online Sunday by the state chapter of the Anti-Defamation League show the covering on the memorial in Lakewood. A message on the covering included an ethnic slur for Jewish people and stated they “will not divide us,” along with the name of a group supposedly responsible for the covering.

State authorities announced Sunday they were offering a $10,000 reward for information leading to conviction of those responsible.

Seven married couples who live in Lakewood, including a rabbi and his wife, now face charges they misrepresented their incomes to get a combined $2 million in public welfare benefits they weren’t entitled to.

Three couples were arrested late Tuesday in Lakewood after four couples, including Rabbi Zalmen Sorotzkin, of Congregation Lutzk, and his wife, Tzipporah, were arrested Monday.

The couples eventually were released without bail after making initial court appearances. Prosecutors say they failed to disclose income from numerous sources on applications for Medicaid, housing, Social Security and food assistance benefits.

The state and federal investigation centers on Lakewood, which is home to a large and growing ultra-Orthodox Jewish community.

Lakewood is the state’s fastest growing town and has more than 100 private religious schools. The population increase has intensified concern over how public money is spent and sparked complaints from neighboring communities that say they face overly aggressive solicitation from real estate agents looking to find homes for the Jewish community.

In another incident, anti-Semitic fliers referencing the recent arrests were placed on the windshields of dozens of cars in Lakewood. It wasn’t clear if the same people are responsible for both acts.

New Jersey’s chapter of the Anti-Defamation League tweeted Sunday, saying that town officials, residents and community leaders “must offer full throated condemnation of this anti-Semitic attack.”

If this act is deemed a crime, then I’d like to see Andrew Anglin or Baked Alaska go to that memorial with a group of their followers, all chanting “Heebs will not divide us. The Holohoax never happened.”

KKK advertising itself as ‘Kool Kids Klub’ on flyers in Upstate NY neighborhood

Well, well, well. What have we here?

Is the Kool Kids Klub really distributing flyers to homes or are Jews perpetrating another hoax in order to keep the shekels flying into the coffers of the ADL and the SPLC by scaring low information, disengaged people who believe that the Klan is lynching thousands of po’ ol’ Nigras every year.

And why is it a serious police matter when flyers are thrown onto someone’s property. Do the police go after other groups who do the same?

Syracuse.com

Flyers advertising a Ku Klux Klan rally were found on driveways in an Upstate NY neighborhood, and local police are asking for the public’s help to determine who put them there.

The Fulton County Sheriff’s Office posted pictures of the flyers on Facebook. They were sealed inside plastic bags which had kitty litter in them to weigh them down.

“Please be aware that there are individuals going around representing themselves as members of the KKK,” the Sheriff’s Office warned residents. “Recent activity has them in Northville over night where they are leaving small bags containing informational pamphlets and kitty litter. This is NOT harmful and can be thrown out.”

The fliers advertise a Klan Rally in Charlottsville, Virginia, in July. They refer to “cultural genocide of white people” and say, “The Kool Kids Klub wants you.”

Police have asked for anyone with information, or a security camera that can show a license plate number of the people who distributed the fliers, to call the sheriff’s office at 518-736-2100.

Police could cite possible suspects for littering.

It’s not the first instance of Klan activity in Upstate NY this year. In February, residents in Fort Plain found Valentine’s Day-themed Klan recruitment flyers telling white people to “love your own race.”

The comments at the source site are just more of the usual name calling. No one ever wants to tackle the issue of how loving your own people is equal to hating all other people. They won’t tackle it because they don’t have a case.

White New Orleans Principal Fired After Spotted Wearing “Nazi” Rings in Video

NICHOLAS DEAN. PRINCIPAL AT A BLACK SCHOOL.

Nicolas Dean, the principal of a black school, who has been making headlines in New Orleans the last week or two, has nothing bad to say about African-Americans. In fact, he makes it clear that he admires their racial solidarity.

Where he raised the hackles of social justice warriors is being smart enough to know that white genocide is real. He used to be a liberal, which makes him more aware than many.

Anyway, Dean’s efforts to raise awareness of white genocide has gotten him fired.

NOLA

Crescent Leadership Academy Principal Nicholas Dean has been removed from his job. The announcement was made shortly after a video surfaced showing him wearing rings associated with white nationalism and the Nazi movement.

He “will not return as the Principal or be associated with Crescent Leadership Academy,” the charter school’s parent group and board said in a statement Thursday (May 25).

Dean declined to comment.

Photographer Abdul Aziz posted the video to Facebook and YouTube three days after Crescent Leadership management removed Dean from the campus while investigating a photo that showed him at the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee next to a Confederate flag.

NICHOLAS DEAN HELPING BLACK STUDENTS AT HIS FORMER SCHOOL.

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ADL Fake News: Antisemitism Up, Trump’s Fault

Jewish propaganda. Even CBS exposes it as such. Take a look at the paragraph I bolded for example.

CBS News

NEW YORK — The Anti-Defamation League found an increase in cases of anti-Semitic intimidation and vandalism last year, evidence that anti-Jewish bias intensified during the election.

The Jewish civil rights group found 1,266 cases of anti-Semitic harassment last year, compared to 941 in 2015 and 912 in 2014. The increase continued into the first three months of this year, with reports of 541 incidents compared to 291 in the same period the year before, according to the ADL data released Monday.

The preliminary 2017 numbers include a wave of more than 150 bomb threats that started in January against Jewish community centers and day schools. Authorities arrested an Israeli Jewish hacker who they said was behind the harassment. The ADL insists those threats should still be considered anti-Semitic since Jews were the target. During the same period, a former journalist in St. Louis was also charged with threatening Jewish organizations as part of a bizarre campaign to intimidate his former girlfriend. But authorities believe the Israeli man is primarily responsible.

Even without those bomb threats, the number of anti-Jewish incidents this January, February and March in the report would be higher than the year before.

The FBI compiles annual hate-crime statistics, but the 2016 numbers aren’t expected to be released until the end of this year. The ADL tally includes a much broader array of incidents, such as distribution of hateful materials, threats, slurs, intimidation and vandalism, along with physical assaults. The organization says its researchers evaluate reports from individuals, community leaders and law enforcement.

This latest compilation includes only a few cases of online harassment – incidents that led to “on the ground” intimidation – so that the organization can continue making year-to-year comparisons of ADL data going back to the group’s first report in 1979, before the internet and social media were so broadly used, according to Oren Segal, director of the ADL Center on Extremism.

Anti-Semitic harassment in the U.S. has been at historic lows in recent years, according to the organization. In some prior years, the number of incidents surpassed 1,500 or 2,000, Segal said. But the recent uptick has fueled anxiety among American Jews during a period of emboldened expressions of white-supremacism and white-nationalism during the presidential election. Last week, a Jewish woman sued the founder of the neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer, accusing the publisher of orchestrating a barrage of anti-Semitic messages from anonymous internet trolls starting last December.

“I think the pace in which the incidents are happening, the speed at which the spike is occurring, I think the historic low is a thing of the past,” Segal said.

The report linked 34 cases last year to the presidential race, including graffiti found in Denver last May that said “Kill the Jews, Vote Trump.” ADL chief executive Jonathan Greenblatt was among the most vocal Jewish leaders pressing Donald Trump, as a candidate and president, to do more to combat anti-Semitism, including among his supporters. Critics, in the Jewish community and elsewhere, said partisanship was behind such pressure on Mr. Trump. In February, Mr. Trump opened his address to Congress with a strong condemnation of recent cases of vandalism at Jewish cemeteries.

On college campuses last year, the number of reports of anti-Semitic incidents remained about the same compared to the previous year, the ADL said. Many of the schools have been roiled in recent years by protests over Israeli policies toward Palestinians. However, the organization saw an increase in the number of reports of harassment against Jewish school children from elementary age through high school.

JEWS FOR TRUMP YARMULKE.