Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About the Difficulties of Life

Wikipedia

Morgan Scott Peck (May 22, 1936 – September 25, 2005) was an American psychiatrist and best-selling author who wrote the book, The Road Less Traveled, published in 1978.

The Road Less Traveled,[9] published in 1978, is Peck’s best-known work, and the one that made his reputation. It is, in short, a description of the attributes that make for a fulfilled human being, based largely on his experiences as a psychiatrist and a person.

The book consists of four parts. In the first part Peck examines the notion of discipline, which he considers essential for emotional, spiritual, and psychological health, and which he describes as “the means of spiritual evolution”. The elements of discipline that make for such health include the ability to delay gratification, accepting responsibility for oneself and one’s actions, a dedication to truth, and “balancing”. “Balancing” refers to the problem of reconciling multiple, complex, possibly conflicting factors that impact on an important decision—on one’s own behalf or on behalf of another.

In the second part, Peck addresses the nature of love, which he considers the driving force behind spiritual growth. He contrasts his own views on the nature of love against a number of common misconceptions about love, including:

that love is identified with romantic love (he considers it a very destructive myth when it is solely relying on “feeling in love”),
that love is related to dependency,
that true love is linked with the feeling of “falling in love”.

Peck argues that “true” love is rather an action that one undertakes consciously in order to extend one’s ego boundaries by including others or humanity, and is therefore the spiritual nurturing—which can be directed toward oneself, as well as toward one’s beloved.

In the third part Peck deals with religion, and the commonly accepted views and misconceptions concerning religion. He recounts experiences from several patient case histories, and the evolution of the patients’ notion of God, religion, atheism—especially of their own “religiosity” or atheism—as their therapy with Peck progressed.

The fourth and final part concerns “grace”, the powerful force originating outside human consciousness that nurtures spiritual growth in human beings. In order to focus on the topic, he describes the miracles of health, the unconscious, and serendipity—phenomena which Peck says:

nurture human life and spiritual growth,
are incompletely understood by scientific thinking,
are commonplace among humanity,
originate outside the conscious human will.

He concludes that “the miracles described indicate that our growth as human beings is being assisted by a force other than our conscious will” (Peck, 1978/1992,[9] p281).

Random House, where the then little-known psychiatrist first tried to publish his original manuscript, turned him down, saying the final section was “too Christ-y.” Thereafter, Simon & Schuster published the work for $7,500 and printed a modest hardback run of 5,000 copies. The book took off only after Peck hit the lecture circuit and personally sought reviews in key publications. Later reprinted in paperback in 1980, The Road first made best-seller lists in 1984 – six years after its initial publication.[8]

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About Success by a British Inventor

Wikipedia

Trevor Graham Baylis CBE (born 13 May 1937) is an English inventor. He is best known for inventing the wind-up radio. Rather than using batteries or external electrical source, the radio is powered by the user winding a crank for several seconds. This stores energy in a spring which then drives an electrical generator to operate the radio receiver. He invented it in response to the need to communicate information about AIDS to the people of Africa.[3] He runs Trevor Baylis Brands plc, a company dedicated to helping inventors to develop and protect their ideas and to find a route to market.[4]

Trial Set to Begin for Negro Monster in Gruesome Burning Murder of Mississippi Mudshark Jessica Chambers

QUINTON VERDELL TELLIS. THE BOYFRIEND.

JESSICA CHAMBERS. THE MISCEGENATOR.

There are at least seven prior posts on this case on this site. Nothing new can be said. So, let’s repeat the mantra: Avoid the groid. Around blacks, never relax.

It’s too bad Jessica Chamber’s father didn’t teach it to her.

Fox News

Jury selection began Monday in the trial of a man accused of dousing a 19-year-old former high school cheerleader with a flammable liquid, setting her ablaze and leaving her to die along a north Mississippi back road.

Quinton Tellis, 29, has been charged with the murder of Jessica Chambers on Dec. 6, 2014, and faces life in prison without parole if convicted. Tellis has pleaded not guilty.

QUINTON TELLIS AND WIFE.

Opening arguments and testimony are expected to begin Tuesday morning, with prosecutors expecting to call more than 40 witnesses in a trial that could last up to two weeks, the Commercial-Appeal reported.

Firefighters in Courtland, Miss., found Chambers beside her burning car on a remote road near a tree farm. Chambers was quickly taken to a Memphis hospital, about 60 miles to the north, with burns over 98 percent of her body. She died hours later.

District Attorney John Champion of Panola County said that he believed it was a “personal crime” as Tellis and Chambers knew each other, and not related to drug or gang activity, even though 17 suspected gang members were arrested as a result of the investigation. The prosecutor has not revealed to reporters what Chambers told firefighters when they found her.

Investigators were stymied early on because they received no information from “street sources,” leading them to theorize that the killing was committed by one person who told no one what happened, Champion had said.

Surveillance video showed Jessica Chambers at a gas station less than two hours before she was found. Wearing a sweater and pajama pants that looked like sweatpants, she put $14 worth of gas in her car, more than the $5 or so she usually purchased, Ali Fadhel, a clerk at the gas station, told The Associated Press in the days after Chambers’ death.

“I asked her, ‘Why are you putting so much gas?’ She said, ‘I’m going somewhere,'” Fadhel said.

On her way out, Chambers got a call on her cellphone, Fadhel said.

Authorities have said about 20,000 telephone numbers were analyzed as part of the investigation, more than 150 people were questioned and investigators traveled to Iowa and Chattanooga, Tenn.

Relatives have described Chambers as friendly and outgoing. She had been a cheerleader and softball player at South Panola High School.

Chambers’ mother, Lisa, has said her daughter liked to smile and playfully stick out her tongue at people. She was trusting of others, making her mother wonder if her outgoing personality had gotten her into trouble.

“She didn’t think anybody could harm her or would want to,” Lisa Chambers has said.

But as the trial approached, Lisa Chambers declined to discuss the case. She has told reporters she spoke with her daughter by phone about an hour before she was found.

When Tellis was indicted, Champion said, investigators worked to figure out where the victim was between 6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. the day she was burned and they had “absolutely filled that hour in.” The 19-year-old was found shortly after 8 p.m. that night.

Tellis has prior convictions for burglary and fleeing police. He was released from prison in October 2014 — two months before Chambers’ killing.

Tellis faces another murder indictment in Louisiana, where he’s accused in the torture death of Meing-Chen Hsiao, a 34-year-old Taiwanese graduate student at the University of Louisiana at Monroe. That indictment alleges that Tellis probably stabbed Hsiao more than 30 times in her face and body with a knife to get her to reveal her debit card’s PIN number before killing her on July 29, 2015. He was extradited to Mississippi from Louisiana in June after pleading guilty to fraudulent use of Hsiao’s card.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: Psalm 58

The perfect quote to be read at the funerals of John McCain, Hillary Clinton, and similar American rulers.

1Justice—do you rulers58:1 Or you gods. know the meaning of the word?
Do you judge the people fairly?

2No! You plot injustice in your hearts.
You spread violence throughout the land.

3These wicked people are born sinners;
even from birth they have lied and gone their own way.

4They spit venom like deadly snakes;
they are like cobras that refuse to listen,

5ignoring the tunes of the snake charmers,
no matter how skillfully they play.

6Break off their fangs, O God!
Smash the jaws of these lions, O Lord!

7May they disappear like water into thirsty ground.
Make their weapons useless in their hands.58:7 Or Let them be trodden down and wither like grass. The meaning of the Hebrew is uncertain.

8May they be like snails that dissolve into slime,
like a stillborn child who will never see the sun.

9God will sweep them away, both young and old,
faster than a pot heats over burning thorns.

10The godly will rejoice when they see injustice avenged.
They will wash their feet in the blood of the wicked.

11Then at last everyone will say,
“There truly is a reward for those who live for God;
surely there is a God who judges justly here on earth.”

Bible.com

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About Worrying About What Other People Think

David Foster Wallace believed that television had a very negative effect on America. Although he never named the Jew as far as I know, it’s the Jewish influence on American life he condemned. Sadly, he was prescribed antidepressants for his depression. He hanged himself.

Excerpt from Wikipedia

David Foster Wallace (February 21, 1962 – September 12, 2008) was an American writer and university instructor of English and creative writing. His novel Infinite Jest (1996) was listed by Time magazine as one of the hundred best English-language novels published between 1923 and 2005.[1] His last novel, The Pale King (2011), was a final selection for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2012.

The Los Angeles Times book reviewer David Ulin called Wallace “one of the most influential and innovative writers of the last twenty years”.[2] Wallace’s works have influenced writers such as Dave Eggers,[3] Zadie Smith,[4] Jonathan Franzen,[5] Elizabeth Wurtzel,[6] George Saunders,[7] Rivka Galchen, Matthew Gallaway, David Gordon, Darin Strauss, Charles Yu, and Deb Olin Unferth.[8]

According to Wallace, “fiction’s about what it is to be a fucking human being”, and he said he wanted to write “morally passionate, passionately moral fiction” that could help the reader “become less alone inside”.[39] In his Kenyon College commencement address, Wallace described the human condition as daily crises and chronic disillusionment and warned against succumbing to solipsism,[40] invoking the existential values of compassion and mindfulness:

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Microchip on the Struggle to Survive

A little elaboration on the quote:

MICROCHIP’S AVATAR. NOT ACTUALLY HIM.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by the Most Beautiful Hollywood Star of Her Era

I’m with Ava.

Wikipedia

Ava Lavinia Gardner (December 24, 1922 – January 25, 1990) was an American actress and singer.

She was signed to a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1941 and appeared mainly in small roles until she drew attention with her performance in The Killers (1946). She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress for her work in Mogambo (1953), and also received BAFTA Award and Golden Globe Award nominations for other films.

Gardner appeared in several high-profile films from the 1940s to 1970s, including The Hucksters (1947), Show Boat (1951), Pandora and the Flying Dutchman (1951), The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1952), The Barefoot Contessa (1954), Bhowani Junction (1956), On the Beach (1959), 55 Days at Peking (1963), Seven Days in May (1964), The Night of the Iguana (1964), The Bible: In the Beginning… (1966), The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972), Earthquake (1974), and The Cassandra Crossing (1976). Gardner continued to act regularly until 1986, four years before her death in London in 1990 at the age of 67.
She is listed 25th among the American Film Institute’s 25 Greatest Female Stars of Classic Hollywood Cinema.[1]

Religion and Political Views[edit]
Although Gardner was exposed to Christianity throughout her early years, she identified herself as an atheist later in life.[17] Religion never played a positive role in her life, according to biographers and Gardner herself, in her autobiography Ava: My Story. Her friend Zoe Sallis, who met her on the set of “The Bible: In The Beginning…” when Gardner was living with John Huston in Puerto Vallarta, said Gardner always seemed unconcerned about religion.[17] When Sallis asked her about religion once, Gardner replied, “It doesn’t exist.”[17] Another factor that attributed to this was the death of Gardner’s father in her younger days, stating, ““[N]obody wanted to know Daddy when he was dying. He was so alone. He was scared. I could see the fear in his eyes when he was smiling. I went to see the preacher, the guy who’d baptized me. I begged him to come and visit Daddy, just to talk to him, you know? Give him a blessing or something. But he never did. He never came. God, I hated him. Cold-ass bastards like that ought to . . . I don’t know . . . they should be in some other racket, I know that. I had no time for religion after that. I never prayed. I never said another prayer.”[17] Concerning politics, Gardner was a lifelong Democrat.[18][19]