Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Sci-Fi Writer and Anti-White Racist Ursula K. Le Guin

When I go seeking inspirational quotes, I’m sometimes led to interesting places. Not all them really inspirational. That quote above offers some practical advice about reality. Then I went about learning more about the author. A shock set in.

I believe Ursula K.Le Guin is a crypto-Jew. For a harsh critique of her hatred of the white race, click here to visit Heretical.

Her Wikipedia entry also confirms her anti-white bias. Here’s an excerpt that covers the basics:

Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (US /ˈɜːrsələ ˈkroʊbər ləˈɡwɪn/;[1] born October 21, 1929) is an American author of novels, children’s books, and short stories, mainly in the genres of fantasy and science fiction. She has also written poetry and essays. First published in the 1960s, her work has often depicted futuristic or imaginary alternative worlds in politics, the natural environment, gender, religion, sexuality and ethnography. In 2016, The New York Times described her as “America’s greatest living science fiction writer”,[2] although she herself has said she would prefer to be known as an “American novelist”.[3]

She influenced such Booker Prize winners and other writers as Salman Rushdie and David Mitchell – and notable science fiction and fantasy writers including Neil Gaiman and Iain Banks.[4] She has won the Hugo Award, Nebula Award, Locus Award, and World Fantasy Award, each more than once.[4][5] In 2014, she was awarded the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.[6] In 2003 she was made a Grandmaster of Science Fiction, one of only a handful of woman writers to take the top honour in a genre that has come to be dominated by male writers.[7] Le Guin has resided in Portland, Oregon, since 1959.[8]

Le Guin became interested in literature quite early. At age 11 she submitted her first story to the magazine Astounding Science Fiction. It was rejected.[17] She continued writing but did not attempt to publish for ten years.

From 1951 to 1961 she wrote five novels, which publishers rejected because they seemed inaccessible.[12] She also wrote poetry during this time, including Wild Angels (1975).[12]

Her earliest writings, some of which she adapted in Orsinian Tales and Malafrena, were non-fantastic stories of imaginary countries. Searching for a way to express her interests, she returned to her early interest in science fiction; in the early 1960s her work began to be published regularly.

If Le Guin is not Jewish, it would be interesting to have David Duke interview her on why her writing is so anti-white.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by British Historian Arnold J. Toynbee

Learn more about the most prominent historian of the 20th century at Wikipedia.

Meeting with Adolf Hitler[edit]
While on a visit in Berlin in 1936 to address the Nazi Law Society, Toynbee was invited to have a private interview with Adolf Hitler, at Hitler’s request.[20] Hitler emphasized his limited expansionist aim of building a greater German nation, and his desire for British understanding and cooperation. Toynbee believed that Hitler was sincere and endorsed Hitler’s message in a confidential memorandum for the British prime minister and foreign secretary.[21]

Russia[edit]
Toynbee was troubled by the Russian Revolution, for he saw Russia as a non-Western society and the revolution as a threat to Western society.[22] However, in 1952 he argued that the Soviet Union had been a victim of Western aggression. He portrayed the Cold War as a religious competition that pitted a Marxist materialist heresy against the West’s spiritual Christian heritage—a heritage that had already been foolishly rejected by a secularized West. A heated debate ensued; an editorial in the London Times promptly attacked Toynbee for treating communism as a “spiritual force.”[23]

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About Violence by Hollywood Legend Sam Peckinpah

Learn more about film director Sam Peckinpah at Wikipedia.

David Samuel “Sam” Peckinpah (/ˈpɛkɪnˌpɑː/;[1] February 21, 1925 – December 28, 1984) was an American film director and screenwriter who achieved prominence following the release of the Western epic The Wild Bunch (1969). He was known for the visually innovative and explicit depiction of action and violence as well as his revisionist approach to the Western genre.

Peckinpah’s films generally deal with the conflict between values and ideals, and the corruption of violence in human society. He was given the nickname “Bloody Sam” owing to the violence in his films. His characters are often loners or losers who desire to be honorable, but are forced to compromise in order to survive in a world of nihilism and brutality.

Peckinpah’s combative personality, marked by years of alcohol and drug abuse, affected his professional legacy. Many of his films were noted for behind-the-scenes battles with producers and crew members, damaging his reputation and career during his lifetime. Some of his films, including Straw Dogs (1971), Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973) and Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974), remain controversial.

Airline Electronics Ban Came After Militants Threatened To Hide Bombs In Laptops

buzzfeed

The United States’ ban on passengers taking laptops, tablet computers, and other electronic devices on flights from 10 airports in the Middle East and North Africa was spurred by increased chatter picked up in recent weeks from militants saying they want to hide explosives in computers, a US official told BuzzFeed News.

The ban was being pushed by the White House, the official said, and Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly subsequently signed on to it.

“It was driven by intelligence,” deputy White House spokesperson Michael Short told BuzzFeed News when asked whether the electronics ban originated in the White House as the official indicated.

While the official said the ban was being implemented because of rising threats, the US has yet to increase the threat level. The ban — which caught the airline industry off-guard — goes into effect at 8 am EST on Saturday and remains in place “indefinitely.”

The official’s statement — that the ban is in response to relatively recent chatter — seems to differ from a statement from the Department of Homeland Security released earlier Tuesday saying the “2015 airliner downing in Egypt, the 2016 attempted airliner downing in Somalia, and the 2016 armed attacks against airports in Brussels and Istanbul” were examples of why increased security was needed.

“Evaluated intelligence indicates that terrorist groups continue to target commercial aviation and are aggressively pursuing innovative methods to undertake their attacks, to include smuggling explosive devices in various consumer items. Based on this information,

Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly and Transportation Security Administrator Acting Administrator Huban Gowadia have determined it is necessary to enhance security procedures for passengers at certain last point of departure airports to the United States,” the statement said.

It does not appear intelligence gathered during the Jan. 29 raid on a suspected al-Qaeda compound in Yemen was part of the US assessment as officials began discussing the rising threat before the Inauguration.

There is also no evidence that the US picked up a specific threat amid the chatter it had intercepted, such as discussion of a future attack.

The department said airlines would have 96 hours to comply with the new rules and the ban would remain in place until “the threat changes.”

Here’s the list of every major air travel hub that is affected by the ban:
Hamad International Airport, Doha, Qatar
Dubai International Airport, UAE
Abu Dhabi International Airport, UAE
Ataturk International Airport, Istanbul, Turkey
Queen Alia International Airport, Amman, Jordan
Cairo International Airport, Egypt
King Abdul Aziz International Airport, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
King Khalid International Airport, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Mohammed V Airport, Casablanca, Morocco
Kuwait International Airport, Kuwait

Devices banned from the cabin — which will need to be packed in checked baggage — on any U.S.-bound flights from those airports include anything larger than a cellphone. Examples include laptops, tablets, e-readers, cameras, portable DVD players, electronic gaming units larger than a smartphone, and travel printers/scanners.

Also on Tuesday, the United Kingdom said it would implement a similar electronics ban, while authorities in Canada said they are considering one.

Contradicting Buzzfeed, The Daily Beast reports that the American raid in Yemen turned up the intelligence that led to the laptop ban.

Information from the raid shows al Qaeda’s successful development of compact, battery bombs that fit inside laptops or other devices believed to be strong enough to bring down an aircraft, the sources said. The battery bombs would need to be manually triggered, a source explained, which is why the electronics ban is only for the aircraft cabin not checked luggage.

CNN offers advice to travelers on how to safeguard data.

Inspirational POEM of the Day: The Bridge Builder

CLICK TO ENLARGE.

Learn more about Will Allen Dromgoole at Wikipedia

Will Allen Dromgoole (October 26, 1860 – September 1, 1934) was an author and poet born in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. She wrote over 7,500 poems; 5,000 essays; and published thirteen books. She was renowned beyond the South; her poem “The Bridge Builder” was often reprinted. It remains quite popular. An excerpt appears on a plaque at the Bellows Falls, Vermont Vilas Bridge, spanning the Connecticut River between southern Vermont and New Hampshire.

The Bridge Builder

BY WILL ALLEN DROMGOOLE

An old man going a lone highway,
Came, at the evening cold and gray,
To a chasm vast and deep and wide.
Through which was flowing a sullen tide
The old man crossed in the twilight dim,
The sullen stream had no fear for him;
But he turned when safe on the other side
And built a bridge to span the tide.

“Old man,” said a fellow pilgrim near,
“You are wasting your strength with building here;
Your journey will end with the ending day,
You never again will pass this way;
You’ve crossed the chasm, deep and wide,
Why build this bridge at evening tide?”

The builder lifted his old gray head;
“Good friend, in the path I have come,” he said,
“There followed after me to-day
A youth whose feet must pass this way.
This chasm that has been as naught to me
To that fair-haired youth may a pitfall be;
He, too, must cross in the twilight dim;
Good friend, I am building this bridge for him!”

Source: Father: An Anthology of Verse (EP Dutton & Company, 1931)

Inspirational Quote of the Day: PLUS a Rebuttal to Solzhenitsyn’s Universal Law

Microchip’s reply to Alexander Solzenhitsyn’s universal law takes into account that the white race is being softly genocided. Thus, our intolerance arises out of our intelligence, not our ignorance.

Haha. Micro’s Tweet won’t show up except for the text since his account has been suspended again for over the 100th time.

This is the Tweet he was responding to:

Another response to this Tweet is interesting too:

Our takeaway should be to think carefully about advice, even from someone as great a thinker as Solzenhitsyn.

Have A Laugh: Urination Instructions (China?)

Claimed to be Japanese.

Australian: “Don’t miss when ya piss.”