Man Charged after Cutting Off Gender Bender’s Testicles

JAMES PENNINGTON. EXPERT WITH A BUTCHER KNIFE.

People who are feeling an urge to become the opposite sex ought to carefully consider the following idea: Men who “become women” are always going to be second rate women. It’s better to be a first rate man.

Surgery is always fraught with danger. Just look at Joan Rivers’ cosmetic surgery, which killed her. Be happy the way you were born and understand that the urge to be the opposite sex is driven by the same kind of mental issues that cause some people to wash their hands hundreds of times a day.

Cutting off an organ is not the same as cutting your hair or cutting your fingernails. It’s serious business. You’re the victim of a psy op that intends to physically neuter many, while mentally neutering everyone. Keep your balls, and not on display on a shelf above the fireplace.

ABC7 Chicago

DENVER — A man is facing felony assault charges after police say he used an Army surgical kit to remove the testicles of a transgender woman in her Denver apartment.

KUSA-TV reports 57-year-old James Pennington, who is not a licensed medical professional in Colorado, is being held without bail after he told investigators Wednesday that he performed the procedure.

According to court documents, the woman’s wife was with her during the 90-minute surgery, and Pennington told the couple to call 911 if complications developed. The wife told police that after changing the dressing, a large amount of blood poured out of the sutured wound.

Doctors were unable to reattach the testicles.

Booking documents do not indicate if Pennington has hired an attorney.

Animals are smarter than humans about some things.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About Happiness

Wikiquote

William A. Feather (25 August 1889 – 7 January 1981) was an American publisher and author, based in Cleveland, Ohio, where he published The William Feather Magazine.

Family Life: The Original Pleasantville – 1949 (Educational Film)

An American family goes from unhappy to happy thanks to mom.

I’m guessing that this film would have been shown in high schools and colleges in the late 40s and early 50s. Notice how intelligent and organized the white family is.

Published on Apr 27, 2014
The Miller family is in a rut. Mom decides to take the initiative and “work out a system for living together in harmony.” From now on, the family will be managed “like a business,” with weekly family council meetings where everyone’s responsibilities will be clearly outlined. This approach strikes the other family members as a terrific idea and everybody ends up happy. The film attempts to Illustrate that proper management of schedules, responsibilities, privileges and finances leads to a happier home.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: Ben Franklin on Advice

Inspirational Quote of the Day: A War Quote by Tolstoy

Wikipedia

Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (/ˈtoʊlstɔɪ, ˈtɒl-/;[1] Russian: Лев Никола́евич Толсто́й, Lev Nikolajevič Tolstoj, pronounced [lʲɛf nʲɪkɐˈlaɪvʲɪtɕ tɐlˈstoj] ( listen); 9 September [O.S. 28 August] 1828 – 20 November [O.S. 7 November] 1910), usually referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian writer who is regarded as one of the greatest authors of all time.

Born to an aristocratic Russian family in 1828, he is best known for the novels War and Peace (1869) and Anna Karenina (1877), often cited as pinnacles of realist fiction. He first achieved literary acclaim in his twenties with his semi-autobiographical trilogy, Childhood, Boyhood, and Youth (1852–1856), and Sevastopol Sketches (1855), based upon his experiences in the Crimean War. Tolstoy’s fiction includes dozens of short stories and several novellas such as The Death of Ivan Ilyich, Family Happiness, and Hadji Murad. He also wrote plays and numerous philosophical essays.

In the 1870s Tolstoy experienced a profound moral crisis, followed by what he regarded as an equally profound spiritual awakening, as outlined in his non-fiction work A Confession. His literal interpretation of the ethical teachings of Jesus, centering on the Sermon on the Mount, caused him to become a fervent Christian anarchist and pacifist. Tolstoy’s ideas on nonviolent resistance, expressed in such works as The Kingdom of God Is Within You, were to have a profound impact on such pivotal 20th-century figures as Mohandas Gandhi,[2] Martin Luther King, Jr.,[3] and James Bevel. Tolstoy also became a dedicated advocate of Georgism, the economic philosophy of Henry George, which he incorporated into his writing, particularly Resurrection.

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One About Self Mastery

Wikipedia

John Milton (9 December 1608 – 8 November 1674) was an English poet, polemicist, man of letters, and civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under Oliver Cromwell. He wrote at a time of religious flux and political upheaval, and is best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost (1667), written in blank verse.

Milton’s poetry and prose reflect deep personal convictions, a passion for freedom and self-determination, and the urgent issues and political turbulence of his day. Writing in English, Latin, Greek, and Italian, he achieved international renown within his lifetime, and his celebrated Areopagitica (1644)—written in condemnation of pre-publication censorship—is among history’s most influential and impassioned defences of free speech and freedom of the press.

William Hayley’s 1796 biography called him the “greatest English author”,[1] and he remains generally regarded “as one of the preeminent writers in the English language”,[2] though critical reception has oscillated in the centuries since his death (often on account of his republicanism). Samuel Johnson praised Paradise Lost as “a poem which…with respect to design may claim the first place, and with respect to performance, the second, among the productions of the human mind”, though he (a Tory and recipient of royal patronage) described Milton’s politics as those of an “acrimonious and surly republican”.[3]

Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by General Robert E. Lee about Doing Right

A good general knows when to change tactics.