Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Virgil

Virgil

Publius Vergilius Maro (Classical Latin: [ˈpuː.blɪ.ʊs wɛrˈɡɪ.lɪ.ʊs ˈma.roː]; traditional dates October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC[1]), usually called Virgil or Vergil /ˈvɜːrdʒᵻl/ in English, was an ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period. He wrote three of the most famous poems in Latin literature, the Eclogues (or Bucolics), the Georgics, and the epic Aeneid. A number of minor poems, collected in the Appendix Vergiliana, are sometimes attributed to him.[2][3]

Virgil is traditionally ranked as one of Rome’s greatest poets. His Aeneid has been considered the national epic of ancient Rome since the time of its composition. Modeled after Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, the Aeneid follows the Trojan refugee Aeneas as he struggles to fulfill his destiny and reach Italy; where his descendants Romulus and Remus were to found the city of Rome. Virgil’s work has had wide and deep influence on Western literature, most notably Dante’s Divine Comedy, in which Virgil appears as Dante’s guide through Hell and Purgatory.[4]

The legend of “Virgil in his basket” arose in the Middle Ages, and is often seen in art and mentioned in literature as part of the Power of Women literary topos, demonstrating the disruptive force of female attractiveness on men. In this story Virgil became enamoured of a beautiful woman, sometimes described as the emperor’s daughter or mistress and called Lucretia. She played him along and agreed to an assignation at her house, which he was to sneak into at night by climbing into a large basket let down from a window. When he did so he was only hoisted halfway up the wall and then left him trapped there into the next day, exposed to public ridicule. The story paralleled that of Phyllis riding Aristotle. Among other artists depicting the scene, Lucas van Leyden made a woodcut and later an engraving.[26]

VIRGIL IN HIS BASKET.

3 thoughts on “Inspirational Quote of the Day: One by Virgil

  1. “…the emperor’s daughter or mistress and called Lucretia.”

    Sounds like the name of some lady from the ‘hood.

    And that was cruel cruel, wooo weeee…

    “…he was to sneak into at night by climbing into a large basket let down from a window. When he did so he was only hoisted halfway up the wall and then left him trapped there into the next day, exposed to public ridicule.”

    He should have jumped! Better to break a leg than be publicly ridiculed by a Jezebel. Maybe he contemplated jumping from the basket from whence came his quote: “They can conquer who believe they can.” 😉

    • The art work shows the basket not really very high up, but in reality it could have been higher. I guess the lesson learned is that when a lady invites me into her boudoir, if she suggests I be hoisted up in a basket, then I know it’s a trick.

  2. Another famous “basket along the wall” story, when the Apostle Paul [original Hebrew name Saul] was trying to escape from the Jews out to kill him for preaching about Christ:

    From Acts chapter 9:

    “And straightway he [Paul] preached Christ in the synagogues, that he [Jesus] is the Son of God. … Saul increased the more in strength, and confounded the Jews which dwelt at Damascus, proving that this is very [the] Christ. And after that many days were fulfilled, the Jews took counsel to kill him: But their laying await was known of Saul. And they watched the gates day and night to kill him. Then the disciples took him by night, and let him down by the wall in a basket.”

    From 2nd Corinthians chapter 11, where Paul describes the tribulations he’s endured for the cause of Christ, including escaping in the basket:

    “Of the Jews five times received I forty stripes [whippings] save one. Thrice was I beaten with rods, once was I stoned, thrice I suffered shipwreck, a night and a day I have been in the deep [sea]; In journeyings often, in perils of waters, in perils of robbers, in perils by mine own countrymen, in perils by the heathen, in perils in the city, in perils in the wilderness, in perils in the sea, in perils among false brethren; In weariness and painfulness, in watchings often, in hunger and thirst, in fastings often, in cold and nakedness. Beside those things that are without, that which cometh upon me daily, the care of all the churches. … In Damascus the governor under Aretas the king kept the city of the Damascenes with a garrison, desirous to apprehend me: And through a window in a basket was I let down by the wall, and escaped his hands.”

    Jesus warned in advance:

    “But the Lord said unto him [Ananias], Go thy way: for he [Saul/Paul] is a chosen vessel unto me, to bear my name before the Gentiles, and kings, and the children of Israel: For I will shew him how great things he must suffer for my name’s sake.” (Acts 9:15-16).

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