Orgasmgate: Vibrator Maker Secretly Tracked Use via Phone App

Liberals mocked Kellyanne Conway for using an example of a person’s microwave oven spying on him. Actually, whether what she said is true or not, any Internet connected product can spy on you–TV, refrigerator, etc.

Even a sexual device can be nosy, as this story alleges.

NPR

The makers of the We-Vibe, a line of vibrators that can be paired with an app for remote-controlled use, have reached a $3.75 million class action settlement with users following allegations that the company was collecting data on when and how the sex toy was used.

Standard Innovations, the Canadian manufacturer of the We-Vibe, does not admit any wrongdoing in the settlement finalized Monday.

The We-Vibe product line includes a number of Bluetooth-enabled vibrators that, when linked to the “We-Connect” app, can be controlled from a smartphone. It allows a user to vary rhythms, patterns and settings — or give a partner, in the room or anywhere in the world, control of the device.

Since the app was released in 2014, some observers have raised concerns that Internet-connected sex toys could be vulnerable to hacking. But the lawsuit doesn’t involve any outside meddling — instead, it centers on concerns that the company itself was tracking users’ sex lives.

The lawsuit was filed in federal court in Illinois in September. It alleges that — without customers’ knowledge — the app was designed to collect information about how often, and with what settings, the vibrator was used.

The lawyers for the anonymous plaintiffs contended that the app, “incredibly,” collected users’ email addresses, allowing the company “to link the usage information to specific customer accounts.”

Customers’ email addresses and usage data were transmitted to the company’s Canadian servers, the lawsuit alleges. When a We-Vibe was remotely linked to a partner, the connection was described as “secure,” but some information was also routed through We-Connect and collected, the lawsuit says.

The unhappy users allege in their lawsuit that they never agreed to the collection of this data. Standard Innovations maintains that users “consented to the conduct alleged” — but instead of taking the case to court, the company agreed to settle.

An estimated 300,000 people bought Bluetooth-enabled WeVibes, according to court documents, and about 100,000 of them used the app.

Under the terms of the settlement, anyone who bought an app-enabled vibrator can receive up to $199 dollars; anyone who actually connected it to the app can collect up to $10,000. The actual amount paid out will depend on how many people file claims; the company estimates people who bought the app will get around $40, and people who used the app around $500.

Here’s an X-rated demonstration of the thing.

3 thoughts on “Orgasmgate: Vibrator Maker Secretly Tracked Use via Phone App

  1. Pingback: Orgasmgate: Vibrator Maker Secretly Tracked Use via Phone App | Afro Futurism

  2. These incidents are not isolated. Pretty much every device and appliance we purchase today utilizes electronics that can be remotely controlled or “influenced”. Phone tapping, for instance goes back to the earliest existence of the telephone. Triangulating a radio broadcast existed in the 1920’s. For generations, AT&T had the capability of remotely turning a rotary dial phone into a listening device. They would do exactly that with proper authorization from the FBI or our intelligence services. With the advent of cordless telephones, anyone could go to RadioShack and buy a “scanner” that picked up cordless phone conversations. The same existed regards cell phones. In the late 90’s, a married couple, using a radio scanner, intercepted and recorded a cell phone call that Newt Gingrich was having with John Boehner and other Republican policiticans. I think that everyone here has heard of the “Internet of Things” which is the network of all of the above-mentioned devices, our cars, computers, and any electronic device that can be remotely programmed to collect data or act as a GPS to pin-point the devices location. I only knew in recent years that all late model cars have “black-boxes” (beyond the standard ECM) that collect our driving data, can be remotely accessed, and can be used by law-enforcement to track the vehicle. Vibrators though, that is a head-shaker.

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