Study sees U.S. life expectancy falling further behind other countries

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Although I have no link to offer, I saw a headline a day or two ago that said that nonwhite, third world doctors make up 25 percent of the doctors in America. Surely, medical schools have dropped the intelligence levels required for study in order to accommodate third world minds. That can’t be good for life expectancy.

Then you have the obese black and Mexican populations straining the medical system with their obesity related illnesses.

Although feminists still screech loudly about the oppression by the patriarchy, women still live substantially longer than men in America. Maybe that’s because white men are working their asses off to pay for welfare benefits for blacks, browns, and single mothers.

Whatever, the USA is fuxated. It’s going to take more than the repeal and replacement of Obamacare to fix what ails a country that aspires to third world status, a country effectively under the control of an (((enemy))) population that seems Hell bent on destroying it.

CBS News

Life expectancy in the United States is already much lower than most other high-income countries and is expected to fall even further behind by 2030, new research published today predicts.

According to the most recent government figures, life expectancy at birth in the United States is 76.3 years for men and 81.2 years for women.

Using a number of forecasting models, researchers from the U.K. predict life expectancy in the U.S. will improve to 83.3 years for women and 79.5 years for men by the year 2030.

But despite these modest gains, the United States is still lagging behind other developed countries.

“The USA has the highest child and maternal mortality, homicide rate, and body-mass index of any high-income country, and was the first of high-income countries to experience a halt or possibly reversal of increase in height in adulthood, which is associated with higher longevity,” the authors write.

The United States also lacks universal health coverage available in other high-income countries and has the largest share of unmet health care needs due to financial costs.

The study, published in The Lancet, predicts and ranks life expectancy for 35 developed countries across Asia, North and Latin America, Australia, and Europe.

The findings predict life expectancy is likely to be highest for women in South Korea at 90.8 years, France at 88.6 years, and Japan at 88.4 years. For men, life expectancies will be highest in South Korea at 84.1 years, and Australia and Switzerland, both at 84 years.

The researchers say other nations, particularly the United States, could take lessons from these countries when it comes to improving life expectancies.

“For example, South Korea projected gains may be the result of continued improvements in economic status which has improved nutrition for children, access to health care and medical technology across the whole population,” study author James Bennett, PhD, of Imperial College London, told CBS News. “South Korea has lower disease risk factors — for example, they appear better at dealing with high blood pressure and have low rates of obesity. A very equitable society means that the whole population has benefitted from improvements.”

Unlike other studies, which typically rely on a single model to predict life expectancy, the researchers used a statistical technique used in weather forecasting to develop 21 models to predict life expectancy in the countries studied.

Studying life expectancy is important, the authors say, because increasing life expectancies will have major implications for health and social services and countries will need to adapt and create new policies to support healthy aging. This may include increase investment in health and social care and possibly changes to retirement age.

In addition to calculating life expectancy at birth, the study authors projected how long people aged 65 years in each country were likely to live in 2030. They found that in 11 of the 35 countries studied, 65-year-old women were likely to live an additional 24 years, while 65-year-old men were likely to live an additional 20 years in 22 of the countries. This suggests that older populations are likely to continue to grow across developed countries.

The authors note that the study cannot take into account certain changes within countries that could impact life expectancy, including the possibility of major political upheaval that can affect social and health care systems.

Link to pdf of Lancet article

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