16 Signs You Are A Slave To The Matrix: Engage In Your Liberation Vikings!

Since WordPress cut off before starting the list of 16, here’s the first one. Read the beginning of the article below and then click on the link to go to Viking Bitch’s Blog to read the other 15. Very informative post by Viking Bitch.

1. You pay taxes to people you’d like to see locked up in jail. This is perhaps the biggest indicator that we are slaves to the matrix. The traditional notion of slavery conjures up images of people in shackles forced to work on plantations to support rich plantation owners. The modern day version of this is forced taxation, where our incomes are automatically docked before we ever see the money, regardless of whether or not we approve of how the money is spent.

Inspiring and Amazing: French Youth Revolt and Declare War on Multiculturalism

Youths descended from the ancestral people of France are fed up with violence, unemployment, and the loss of their country to diversity and multiculturalism. In this video both young men and young women declare their intention to take their country back.

Supreme Court Hears Case That Could Open Up ‘Every American’s Life To The Police Department’

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More intrusion on our privacy?

Erin Fuchs

The Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a huge privacy case that will determine whether the cops can search the digital contents of your cellphone without a warrant.

The case involves a San Diego college student (and alleged gang member) named David Riley, who was pulled over in 2009 for having expired tags. Police seized Riley’s Samsung Instinct M800 and used a photo on it to charge him with participating in a drive-by shooting. He was ultimately convicted and sentenced to 15 years to life.

During arguments on Tuesday morning, Riley’s lawyer Jeffrey Fisher told the justices there are “very, very profound problems with searching a smartphone without a warrant.” He’s arguing for his client that such searches violate the Fourth Amendment, which protects against unreasonable searches and seizures.

Technically, the police can search your person at the scene of a crime, as Justice Samuel Alito pointed out while asking this question of Fisher:

Suppose your client were an old­school guy and he didn’t have ­­ he didn’t have a cell phone. He had a billfold and he had photos that were important to him in the billfold. He had that at the time of arrest. Do you dispute the proposition that the police could examine the photos in his billfold and use those as evidence against him?

Of course, Fisher didn’t dispute this proposition. However, he argued there’s a fundamental privacy difference between physical items and the huge amount of private, digital information stored on your cellphone.

Fisher implied that allowing cops to access this information without a warrant is tantamount to giving “the police officers authority to search through the private papers and the drawers and bureaus and cabinets of somebody’s house.”

If the Supreme Court rules against his client, Fisher warned, it could open up “every American’s entire life to the police department, not just at the scene but later at the station house and downloaded into their computer forever.”

The Supreme Court will hand down its decision in the Riley case later this term. Interestingly, the conservative Justice Antonin Scalia may end up siding with Riley, as he’s been a champion of the Fourth Amendment lately, as the Los Angeles Times has reported.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/supreme-court-hears-riley-v-california-2014-4#ixzz30MOjwBRB

Incredible Heat Map: Where Tornados Strike Most Often

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Click to enlarge the map. The map below provides an additional perspective on where tornadoes strike.

stateavgtornadoes

Source: Business Insider

Have A Laugh: Try Harder, Please!

humor woman making kiss selfie

This is why posting your photos on the Internet is not a good idea.

Sharks? NO WAY. Meet the World’s Deadliest Animals Courtesy of Bill Gates

Why are sharks so demonized? Was it the movie Jaws?

Source: Bill Gates Blog